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National Academy of Inventors Announces 2019 Fellows

The National Academy of Inventors has elected 168 academic inventors to the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 3, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 prolific academic innovators from across the world to NAI Fellow status.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

“Congratulations to the 2019 class of NAI Fellows,” said Laura A. Peter, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “It is a privilege to welcome these exceptionally-qualified individuals to this prestigious organization. I am certain their accomplishments will inspire the next generation of invention pioneers.”

Peter will be the keynote speaker at the 2020 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, April 10, 2020, in Phoenix, Arizona, a commemorative event at the Ninth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors. At the ceremony, Fellows will be formally inducted by Peter and NAI President Paul R. Sanberg in recognition of their outstanding achievements. “I am so impressed by the caliber of this year’s class of NAI Fellows, all of whom are highly-regarded in their respective fields,” said Sanberg. “The breadth and scope of their discovery is truly staggering. I’m excited not only see their work continue, but also to see their knowledge influence a new era of science, technology, and innovation worldwide.”

The complete list of all NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website


The 2019 Class of NAI Fellows:

  • Ernesto V. Abel-Santos, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • David A. Ahlquist, Mayo Clinic
  • Susan D. Allen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
  • Andrea Alù , Advanced Science Research Center, City University of New York
  • Guillermo A. Ameer, Northwestern University
  • Subramaniam Ananthan, Southern Research Institute
  • Gattadahalli M. Anantharamaiah, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Rodolphe Barrango, North Carolina State University
  • Rena Bizios, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Michael Blaber, Florida State University
  • Anne J. Blaschke-Bonkowsky, The University of Utah
  • Stephen A. Boppart, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Robert Bowser, Barrow Neurological Institute
  • Michael S. Brown, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • Ardeshir (Adi) Ratan Bulsara, Naval Information Warfare Center
  • Jason Burdick, University of Pennsylvania
  • Lewis C. Cantley, Cornell University
  • Michael L. Chabinyc, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bryce Chackerian, The University of New Mexico
  • Paul Citron, University of California, San Diego
  • John P. Cooke, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Jerome Cox, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Seamus Curran, University of Houston
  • Pamela B. Davis, Case Western Reserve University
  • Cristina E. Davis, University of California, Davis
  • Peter B. Dervan, California Institute of Technology
  • Tejal A. Desai, University of California, San Francisco
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jon P. Dobson, University of Florida
  • Francis Joseph Doyle, III, Harvard University
  • Dongsheng Duan, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Dean B. Edwards, University of Idaho
  • Ayman Sabry El-Baz, University of Louisville
  • John F. Engelhardt, University of Iowa
  • Laura Ensign, Johns Hopkins University
  • William J. Federspiel, University of Pittsburgh
  • Terri Fiez, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Francis Stuart Foster, University of Toronto
  • Kaizhong Gao, Argonne National Laboratory
  • Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, Mount Sinai Health System
  • Glenn R. Gaudette, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Robert J. Genco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Georgios B. Giannakis, University of Minnesota
  • John Murray Gibson, Florida A&M University
  • Joseph L. Goldstein, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
  • Kenneth E. Goodson, Stanford University
  • Renukaradhya J. Gourapura, The Ohio State University
  • David Grewell, North Dakota State University
  • David Grier, New York University
  • Robert E. Guldberg, University of Oregon
  • Bernard Franklin Gupton, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Horst Hahn, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/University of California, Irvine
  • Yousef Haik, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
  • Robert P. Hammer, Louisiana State University
  • Luis Rafael Herrera-Estrella, Texas Tech University/Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados
  • Bertrand Hochwald, University of Notre Dame
  • Robert S. Hodges, University of Colorado Anschutz
  • Jeffrey O. Hollinger, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Victor J. Hruby, The University of Arizona
  • Hong Hua, The University of Arizona
  • Jessica E. Huber, Purdue University
  • John David Irwin, Auburn University
  • Bor Zeng B. Jang, National Cheng Kung University
  • Jules Janick, Purdue University
  • Wilfred A. Jefferies, The University of British Columbia
  • Jerome B. Johnson, University of Alaska Fairbanks
  • Wayne Jones, University of New Hampshire
  • Eric R. Kandel, Columbia University
  • Kristi Kiick, University of Delaware
  • Israel Kleinberg, Stony Brook University
  • Leonard Kleinrock, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Melissa Knothe Tate, University of New South Wales
  • Julia A. Kornfield, California Institute of Technology
  • David M. Kranz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Jack H. Ladenson, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Gianluca Lazzi, University of Southern California
  • Walter S. Leal, University of California, Davis
  • Fred J. Leonberger, University of South Florida
  • Danuta Leszczynsk, Jackson State University
  • Yiannis A. Levendis, Northeastern University
  • Jonathan S. Lewin, Emory University
  • Jun Li, Kansas State University
  • David A. Lightfoot, Southern Illinois University
  • Jingyu Lin, Texas Tech University
  • Yuehe Lin, Washington State University
  • Fu-Tong Liu, Academia Sinica
  • Liang Liu, Macau University of Science and Technology
  • Kunlei Liu, University of Kentucky
  • Ray Liu, University of Maryland
  • Karen Lozano, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
  • G.Q. Max Lu, University of Surrey
  • Anita Mahadevan-Jansen, Vanderbilt University
  • Radenka Maric, University of Connecticut
  • Olimpia Meucci, Drexel University
  • Sanjit K. Mitra, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • John P Mugler, III, University of Virginia
  • Priyabrata Mukherjee, University of Oklahoma
  • Satish Nagarajaiah, Rice University
  • Madhavan Nair, Florida International University
  • Balaji Narasimhan, Iowa State University
  • Kathryn Nightingale, Duke University
  • Valentine Asongu Nzengung, University of Georgia
  • Fiorenzo Omenetto, Tufts University
  • Boon S. Ooi, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Ebru Oral, Harvard Medical School
  • Mihrimah Ozkan, University of California, Riverside
  • Peter Palese, Mount Sinai Health System
  • Keith D Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • David S. Peabody, The University of New Mexico
  • Carlos Pignataro, North Carolina State University
  • Albert P. Pisano, University of California, San Diego
  • Leslie S. Prichep, New York University
  • Yihong Qi, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roderic Quirk, The University of Akron
  • John Michael Ramsey, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aragula Gururaj Rao, Iowa State University
  • Mehdi Razavi, Texas Heart Institute
  • Floyd E. Romesberg, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Mendel Rosenblum, Stanford University
  • Rob A. Rutenbar, University of Pittsburgh
  • Daniela Salvemini, Saint Louis University
  • Kamal Sarabandi, University of Michigan
  • Roger R. Schmidt, Syracuse University
  • Holger Schmidt, University of California, Santa Cruz
  • Christopher A. Schuh, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Steve Schwendeman, University of Michigan
  • Thomas A. Sellers, H. Lee Mott Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Timothy John Senden, Australian National University
  • Surendra P. Shah, The University of Texas at Arlington/ Northwestern University
  • Mubarak Shah, University of Central Florida
  • Neil G. Siegel, University of Southern California
  • John C. H. Spence, Arizona State University
  • Peter J. Stang, The University of Utah
  • James Fraser Stoddart, Northwestern University
  • Howard A. Stone, Princeton University
  • James C. Sturm, Princeton University
  • Kenneth Ray Swartzel, North Carolina State University
  • Francis C. Szoka, University of California, San Francisco
  • Lakshman Tamil, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Gabor Temes, Oregon State University
  • H. Thomas Temple, Nova Southeastern University
  • Gregory J. Thompson, West Virginia University
  • Natalia A. Trayanova, Johns Hopkins University
  • Hai H. Trieu, The University of Memphis
  • Li-Huei Tsai, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Aykut Üren, Georgetown University
  • Carl-Wilhelm Vogel, University of Hawai’i Cancer Center
  • Lawrence Wald, Massachusetts General Hospital Research Institute
  • Ge Wang, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Hongjun Wang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Chao-Yang Wang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eric Dean Wetzel, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Margaret Wheatley, Drexel University
  • Ryan Wicker, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Samuel A. Wickline, University of South Florida
  • Robert Williams, III, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Blake S. Wilson, Duke University
  • Stanislaus S. Wong, Stony Brook University
  • Chee Wei Wong, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Karen L. Wooley, Texas A&M University
  • Min Wu, University of Maryland
  • Jenny Jie Yang, Georgia State University
  • Cathy Yao, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Samuel Yen-Liang Yin, National Taiwan University
  • Gleb Yushin, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Xin Zhang, Boston University
  • Chuan-Jian Zhong, Binghamton University, The State University of New York

 

 

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology and Innovation’s latest issue explores innovative technologies and methodologies, including the intersection of dance and assistive technology, blockchain platform payments, and customer-centric practices applied to academia.

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 20, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation® (21:1) features a selection of papers highlighting innovations in fields as varied as medicine, finance, and pedagogy. Taking the broad view of mindsets and skillsets powering progress for the future, authors delve into the rich rewards to be found in using the intersection of dance and assistive technology to ignite creative advancements in both areas, recommendations for moving the needle on women’s participation in patent-rich disciplines and jobs, and the application of customer-centric practices from management disciplines to academia, among others

Of particular interest is Dr. Nasser Arshadi’s “Blockchain Platform for Real-Time Payments: A Less Costly and More Secure Alternative to ACH.” Given the increasing focus on blockchain, this paper offers a timely survey of the history and a cogent evaluation of the promise of this platform. After a discussion of the development of banking and automated clearing house (ACH) legacy systems, Arshadi examines the blockchain platform for real-time payments as an alternative. When compared to our current use of ACH in the U.S., Arshadi calculates that the use of real-time blockchain protocol equals billions of dollars of saving for businesses and customers.

“This publication represents an opportunity to share best practices across a number of critical platforms,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, leader of the knowledge enterprise development at Arizona State University and vice president for strategic initiatives membership for the National Academy of Inventors. “It also provides insight into niche areas of emerging technology that are important in our various capacities as researchers, scientists, inventors, and educators.”

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic Innovation

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.
 

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Lee, University of California, Irvine
  • Anna M. Leese de Escobar, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Warren J. Leonard, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
  • Johannes A. Lercher, Technical University of Munich
  • Teik C. Lim, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Craig W. Lindsley, Vanderbilt University/Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery
  • Elizabeth G. Loboa, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Ted L. Maddess, Australian National University
  • Elizabeth M. McNally, Northwestern University
  • Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ellis Meng, University of Southern California
  • Joachim Messing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Lalit K. Mestha, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Lyle R. Middendorf, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Shaker A. Mousa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
  • William P. Murphy, Jr., Florida International University
  • William L. Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Prakash Nagarkatti, University of South Carolina
  • Nathan Newman, Arizona State University
  • Bert W. O’Malley, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Aydogan Ozcan, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia University
  • Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University
  • Roderic I. Pettigrew, Texas A&M University
  • Apparao M. Rao, Clemson Nanomaterials Institute/Clemson University
  • Theodore S. Rappaport, New York University
  • Rafael Reif, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joshua Rokach, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Yoram Rudy, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wheeler Ruml, University of New Hampshire
  • Thomas P. Russell, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jagannathan Sarangapani, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Vinod Sarin, Boston University
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College
  • Steven J. Sasson, University of South Florida
  • Christine E. Schmidt, University of Florida
  • Zheng John Shen, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Thomas E. Shenk, Princeton University
  • Mark B. Shiflett, University of Kansas
  • Michael L. Simpson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory/The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Koji Sode, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Costas M. Soukoulis, Iowa State University/Ames Laboratory
  • John W. Spirk, Cleveland Clinic
  • Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • William Studier, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University
  • Koduvayur P. Subbalakshmi, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Bruce A. Sullenger, Duke University
  • Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University
  • Jing Sun, University of Michigan
  • Yu Sun, University of Toronto
  • Wanchun Tang, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego
  • Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • David A. Tirrell, California Institute of Technology
  • Don M. Tucker, University of Oregon
  • Jeffrey S. Vitter, The University of Mississippi
  • Israel E. Wachs, Lehigh University
  • Albert Wang, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael S. Waterman, University of Southern California
  • Alan W. Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Louis M. Weiner, Georgetown University
  • Robert G. Wilhelm, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Yushan Yan, University of Delaware
  • Jian Yang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eui-Hyeok Yang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Mark H. Yim, The University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael J. Yost, Medical University of South Carolina
  • James M. Zavislan, University of Rochester
  • Ruiwen Zhang, University of Houston
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine

Beyond Accessibility

Technology & Innovation’s latest issue, “Technologies for Disabilities,” focuses on new solutions and new paradigms for assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2018) Technology & Innovation (T&I), journal of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), has released a new special topic issue titled “Technologies for Disabilities.” The issue delves into revolutionary devices, cutting-edge materials and processes, and new theories on designing for users with disabilities.

In every sector of modern society, technological advancements have transformed the way the world works, travels, communicates, and learns. However, not all have been equal beneficiaries of these innovations.

One billion people – the 15 percent of the world’s population who have some form of disability – have largely been left behind by technologies designed for and targeted towards people without disabilities. The new issue of T&I, (20:1-2) (full text) focuses on researchers who are attempting to correct this disparity by creating revolutionary new devices and radically changing how we design assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

“Enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities has been the goal of much of my research, and it is the goal of this special issue as well,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, vice president of the NAI and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “By designing technology where accessibility is the goal rather than an afterthought, we are setting the stage for better and more inclusive technological solutions.”

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

Two Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors Win Nobel Prizes

James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2018) – James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Allison was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, sharing the honor with Dr. Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Allison and Honjo received the prize “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.”

“I was trying to understand how T cells worked,” Allison told Adam Smith, an interviewer for TheNobelPrize.org. “I figured out this one thing about this negative regulator, and I had this idea that if we just took that off, maybe it would do a better job of killing cancer cells. Turns out it works.”

Allison was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2017. He also received the Wolf Prize in Medicine in 2017, and he received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in 2015.

Arnold received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the directed evolution of enzymes.” She conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes in 1993.

“I was able to look at the problem with a totally fresh set of eyes – a problem that had challenged people since the techniques were available,” Arnold said in a phone interview, moments after receiving the award. “I realized that the way that most people were going about protein engineering was doomed to failure.”

Arnold has since refined the methods that are now routinely used to develop new catalysts. She was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2014. She was also inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014, and she received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2011.

“We are thrilled to congratulate Allison and Arnold on these momentous achievements,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

National Academy of Inventors Releases 2018 Activities Report

The National Academy of Inventors has released its annual Activities Report, which catalogs each of the organization’s programs, membership categories, publications and yearly events.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 2, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) published its annual Activities Report today, which highlights the organization’s major events, programs and members.

The 2018 Activities Report features two new programs: the Senior Member program and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). The Senior Member program welcomes inventors early in their careers who aspire to make an impact on the academic community. GAIN is a mentoring platform exclusively available to NAI members.

“The annual Activities Report is our chance to feature our members and the incredible work they do,” said Spencer Montgomery, NAI Director. “The report spotlights inventors at each of our Sustaining Member Institutions, reviews the 2018 Annual Meeting and explains our newest programs.”

The 2018 Activities Report includes statistics on the impact NAI Fellows make on their communities, including how many companies they have formed, how many jobs they have created and more. The report highlights the NAI’s 2018 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, D.C. last April, which brought together over 450 members of the organization.

The publication provides updates and details on each of the NAI’s programs, including the Fellows program, Senior Member program, GAIN platform, NAI Chapter program and the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It concludes with a list of each member of the 2017 class of Fellows, who were inducted at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

The 2018 Activities Report is available online. Physical copies are available upon request.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches New Membership

The National Academy of Inventors’ Senior Member program honors early-stage inventors and innovators who aspire to make a real impact on society through the patenting and commercialization processes.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 1, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has launched a new membership category, the Senior Member program. The program will recognize and honor early-stage academic inventors who aspire to make a real impact on society through invention and innovation. 

The NAI Senior Member program seeks active researchers and professionals who demonstrate success in patenting, licensing and commercialization activities, and foster a spirit of innovation through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

“The Senior Member program is an exciting addition to our existing membership,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “Inventors who seek to influence and support the academic invention ecosystem have the opportunity to join the NAI’s global network of innovators striving toward a common goal.”

Elected NAI Senior Members will have access to the NAI’s premier mentorship platform, the Global Academic Inventor Network, exclusively available to NAI members. They will also have opportunities for networking and education through NAI-led panels, meetings, and committees, including the opportunity to publish in NAI’s Technology & Innovation journal.

“This program has been carefully constructed to welcome and honor a new cadre of academic inventors into our community,” said Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. “We look forward to recognizing young innovators and academically-minded individuals in the early stages of their innovation careers who aspire to reach new heights within the invention community.”

Nominations for the NAI Senior Member program opened today, and the organization will continue to accept nomination submissions on a rolling basis. Notices of election will be announced quarterly, with the inaugural class election slated for February 2019.

Eligible individuals should hold at minimum one issued U.S. patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office which has been licensed or commercialized. As an alternative, candidates may demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding five or more U.S. patents. All nominees must be affiliated with a Member Institution of the NAI.

For more information, visit the NAI website or contact Jacquie Burckley, Senior Member Coordinator, at [email protected].

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

United States Senate Resolution Recognizes the National Academy of Inventors

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 27, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has been officially recognized by the United States Senate through Senate Resolution 620, introduced as a bipartisan measure by Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri and affirmed unanimously by the full Senate on Aug. 28, 2018. 

The resolution recognizes the NAI and honors the organization’s milestone of achieving 200 member institutions.

In addition to acknowledging the NAI’s “rapid expansion,” the resolution affirms that the Senate “supports the mission of the National Academy of Inventors [and]…acknowledges the National Academy of Inventors for its role in elevating the contributions of academic inventors across all disciplines.”

“It is an honor to be recognized by the U.S. Senate for the NAI’s success in encouraging academic innovation in the United States and internationally,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “We greatly appreciate and thank Senators Nelson and Blunt for sponsoring this resolution and ensuring its swift passage.”

The NAI was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI partners closely with the USPTO in the pursuit of this mission.

“Through the doors of the USPTO walk inventors and entrepreneurs with innovations that will spur investment, create new jobs, grow our economy, and help us achieve our highest ideals,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. “Many of these will come from the National Academy of Inventors.”

The NAI now boasts more than 4,000 individual members and fellows spanning over 250 universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes.

“We are proud of the measurable impact that the NAI and our member institutions and individual inventor members and fellows are making throughout the world,” said Sanberg.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation.www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Three NAI Fellows Inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 11, 2018) – Dr. Emery Brown, Dr. Richard Houghten and Dr. Sudipta Seal, all Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame on September 7, 2018. Seven innovators were inducted during the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

Brown, Houghten and Seal join a number of NAI Fellows who have previously received this recognition, including NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg.

“It is a momentous feeling to see that nearly half of this year’s inductees to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame are NAI Fellows,” Sanberg said. “Dr. Brown, Dr. Houghten and Dr. Seal have made an incredible impact on the innovation landscape in Florida, and we are proud to support them as they receive this well-deserved honor.”

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates those inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the United States.

“It has been wonderful to see Florida embrace and elevate its own proud history of invention through the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. “Through this organization, Florida has rightly claimed its mantel as a leader in national innovation.”

Brown is Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of anesthesiology. He holds three issued U.S. patents.

Houghten founded the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and currently serves as CEO. His research has had significant impact on the pharmaceutical industry, and his innovative approach has revolutionized drug discovery across the nation. He holds 81 issued U.S. patents.

Seal is Trustee Chair, Pegasus and University Distinguished Professor at the University of Central Florida. His expertise in materials science and engineering led to groundbreaking discoveries and therapeutic applications of nano cerium oxide in regenerative nano-medicine. He holds 48 issued U.S. patents and his technology is licensed to multiple companies.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches Global Academic Inventor Network

The National Academy of Inventors aims to connect seasoned and world-renowned academic inventors with students and other junior professionals to aid them in advancing their innovative careers. 

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 5, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) today announced the launch of the Global Academic Inventors Network (GAIN). GAIN is an international mentoring platform exclusively available to academic inventors.

NAI President Paul R. Sanberg first announced the concept of a global network at the NAI’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April 2018.

“It is our hope that this network helps ease the process for emerging inventors as they take an initial idea through the entire discovery process and, then, licensing and commercializing that technology for the benefit of society,” Sanberg said.

GAIN is one of a number of initiatives that the NAI has announced in 2018. The platform is engineered to make it easy for inventive students and faculty to connect, while giving them the tools, automation and security to bring the global invention community together and drive innovation.

“The Global Academic Inventors Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration,” said Dr. Karen J.L. Burg, member of the NAI Board of Directors. “By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasoned inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

For a limited time, NAI Sustaining Member Institutions, Chapters and Fellows will receive exclusive priority access to join GAIN. Following the initial launch stage, the NAI will open the platform to the entire NAI community.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

The Invention Gender Gap

Special topic issue explores the gender gap between men and women in inventorship, analyzing its causes, evaluating current efforts to address it, and suggesting new ideas to eliminate this disparity 

Tampa, Fla. (Jul. 16, 2018) – Statistics show that women are named as inventors on less than one in five U.S. patents. Why does this gender disparity exist, and what is being done to address it? The new issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19:4) (full text) tackles these key questions, and the papers collected here serve as a primer on the state of the invention gender gap, why it persists, and what can be done to change it.

“There is perhaps no area more crucial to explore than the gender gap in invention,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and co-editor-in-chief of T&I. “The persistence of this problem cuts us off from leveraging the full innovative potential of half of our population, thus reducing our innovative output and making us less competitive as a nation. In addition to the many articles on the gender gap, we are also taking this opportunity to honor our women NAI Fellows, as are the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Science and Technology Medals Foundation with their respective women Inductees and Laureates.”

The full issue highlights can be found at the following link: https://academyofinventors.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue-Highlights-Aesthetic-Final.pdf

 

ARTICLES INCLUDED:

  • Feminist Challenge to Gene Patents
  • Gender Data Gap: Baseline of U.S. Academic Institutions
  • Engaging Women Innovators: Analytical Support For Women Innovator Programming in University Technology Transfer
  • Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Invention and Technology Commercialization
  • On the Commercialization Path: Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Outputs among Women in STEM
  • Closing Diversity Gaps in Innovation: Gender, Race, and Income Disparities in Patenting and Commercialization of Inventions
  • Addressing the Gender Gap among Patent Holders through Invention Education Policies
  • Breaking Barriers: Female Inventors Blazing a Path Forward
  • From the USPTO: Mind the Gap—The USPTO’s Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Patenting and Innovation
  • The NAI Fellow Profile: An Interview with Dr. Michelle Khine
  • Investing in Academic Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Moving Beyond Research Funding through the NSF I-CORPS® Program
  • On the Software Patenting Controversy
  • NAI Chapter Spotlight: University of Southern California
  • Innovation in Action: Arizona State University

 

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 Announced

Top University Patent Holders Revealed in Report Authored by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla. (June 5, 2018) – The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is used to compile the report, which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

Published annually since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, the report ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO during the 2017 calendar year. The full report can be found at: https://www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/top-100-universities-2017.pdf

“The institutions on this list are doing incredible work promoting academic innovation and incubating groundbreaking technologies which exemplify the importance of technology transfer to institutional success,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are proud to collaborate with the IPO for the sixth consecutive year and it is a privilege to showcase the vital contributions to society made by universities.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2017 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Texas System, Stanford University, Tsinghua University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Johns Hopkins University, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Harvard University and California Institute of Technology.

“University patents help to ignite a culture of growth and innovation which in turn stimulates local, regional, and global economies and generates funding for future research initiatives,” said Mark W. Lauroesch, IPO Executive Director. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents is a report which demonstrates the critical role universities play in patents, licensing and commercialization.”

IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2017 will be released for the 35th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2017 calendar year. For patents with one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected].

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions, and growing rapidly. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO
The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

 

RENOWNED RESEARCHERS, POLICYMAKERS, AND ACADEMIC LEADERS TO CONVERGE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. FOR 2018 NAI CONFERENCE

The Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 4-6

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Over 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Washington, D.C. on April 4-6 for the Seventh Annual Conference of the NAI. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Ronald M. Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies; David J. Skorton, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the City College of New York and president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will also include the NAI’s second annual Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s seventh annual conference is “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Intersection of Innovation and the Future, Intersection of Ideas and Entrepreneurship, and Intersection of Academia, Government, and Industry. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

“Our nation’s capital provides a fitting backdrop as we explore the intersections of academia, industry, and government in the innovation space,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The conference program engages with these wide-ranging facets of academic invention through timely panels and presentations, the induction of the newest class of NAI Fellows, and the Student Innovation Showcase. I look forward to three days of networking and learning with our attendees, while honoring the amazing accomplishments of our members.”

The NAI will induct the newest class of Fellows on April 5 at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“I am honored to join the NAI as the annual conference returns to Washington for another year of insightful programming,” Hirshfeld said. “The NAI has initiated an exciting dialogue on academic innovation that continues to gain momentum. I look forward to recognizing the next class of NAI Fellows and their substantial contributions in academic discovery and innovation which improve our quality of life and influence the next generation of thought leaders.”

Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs. In addition, over $137 billion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries. Among all NAI Fellows there are over 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, more than 440 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 37 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, and 29 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

The meeting will conclude with NAI’s Student Innovation Showcase. The showcase, in its second year, offers a unique platform for students to demonstrate world-changing inventions to the highest caliber of innovators. Six interdisciplinary student teams from prestigious research universities, including The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, University of South Florida, University of Southern California, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Worcester Polytechnic University have been invited to exhibit their inventions to a panel of prolific inventors.

“As both an inventor and administrator, I cannot overemphasize the importance of fostering young inventors throughout their academic trajectories,” said Helena Wisniewski, vice provost for research & graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NAI Fellow, and Student Innovation Showcase judge. “I am delighted to see the NAI continue to engage its network of prominent academic inventors to support the next generation of innovators, and I look forward to serving as a judge for the Student Innovation Showcase.”

A detailed agenda is available at https://www.academyofinventors.org/conference/docs/2018-nai-conference-preliminary-agenda.pdf. Invited papers from the conference will be published in the NAI journal Technology and Innovation. To learn more about Technology and Innovation, visit https://www.academyofinventors.org/ti/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. Learn more at www.academyofinventors.org.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2017 FELLOWS

155 academic inventors honored with esteemed distinction

TAMPA, Fla., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 155 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“Congratulations to the exceptional academic inventors who comprise the 2017 class of NAI Fellows,” said Shirley Malcom, Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It was my privilege to support the important mission of the NAI as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee. The NAI Fellows Program plays a vital role in bringing to the forefront the essential scientific and economic contributions of our nation’s inventors.”

On 5 Apr. 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference in Washington, DC. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Commissioner for Patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“Once again, I am in awe of the inventors elected as NAI Fellows. It was my honor to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and participate in this unique recognition of impactful patented contributions to science and technology,” Hirshfeld said, “I look forward to celebrating this remarkable group at the 2018 NAI Conference at the Smithsonian American Art Museum which was once known as the Temple of Invention during its years as the first dedicated home of the U.S. Patent Office. This historic national landmark serves as an extremely fitting location to once again showcase inventors and their technologies.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention—their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

The 2017 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full-page announcement in the 19 Jan. 2018 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Science and Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors.

2017 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Samuel I. Achilefu, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dereje Agonafer, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Mark G. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Hiroshi Amano, Nagoya University
  • Richard R. Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Leif Andersson, Texas A&M University and Uppsala University
  • J. Roger P. Angel, The University of Arizona
  • Diran Apelian, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Plamen B. Atanassov, The University of New Mexico
  • Craig H. Benson, University of Virginia
  • Cory J. Berkland, The University of Kansas
  • Vijayakumar Bhagavatula, Carnegie Mellon University
  • David J. Bishop, Boston University
  • Donald L. Bitzer, North Carolina State University
  • Randy D. Blakely, Florida Atlantic University
  • Helen M. Blau, Stanford University
  • Timothy M. Block, Baruch S. Blumberg Institute
  • Daniel J. Blumenthal, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Susmita Bose, Washington State University
  • Steven T. Boyce, University of Cincinnati
  • Edward S. Boyden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Anthony B. Brennan, University of Florida
  • Carrie L. Byington, Texas A&M University
  • Marvin H. Caruthers, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Dennis S. Charney, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky
  • Yet Ming Chiang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joanne Chory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mooi Choo Chuah, Lehigh University
  • David E. Clemmer, Indiana University
  • Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University
  • Stanley N. Cohen, Stanford University
  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Pieter Cullis, The University of British Columbia
  • Mari Dezawa, Tohoku University
  • William L. Ditto, North Carolina State University
  • Prabir K. Dutta, The Ohio State University
  • Jack A. Elias, Brown University
  • Zhigang Z. Fang, The University of Utah
  • Tim A. Fischell, Michigan State University and Western Michigan University
  • Paul B. Fisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Edward P. Furlani, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Guangping Gao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University
  • Bruce E. Gnade, Southern Methodist University
  • Lawrence Gold, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sheila A. Grant, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Mark A. Griswold, Case Western Reserve University
  • Horng-Jyh Harn, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital
  • Robert W. Heath, Jr., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Walter Brown Herbst, Northwestern University
  • Mark C. Hersam, Northwestern University
  • David M. Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ming Hsieh, University of Southern California
  • Ian W. Hunter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Mikko Hupa, Åbo Akademi University
  • Oliver C. Ibe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  • Eric D. Isaacs, The University of Chicago
  • Subramanian S. Iyer, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Joseph A. Izatt, Duke University
  • William R. Jacobs, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University
  • Stephen Albert Johnston, Arizona State University
  • Ranu Jung, Florida International University
  • Brian L. Justus, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
  • Alexander V. Kabanov, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aravinda Kar, University of Central Florida
  • Kazunori Kataoka, The University of Tokyo
  • Howard E. Katz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Arie E. Kaufman, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Donald B. Keck, University of South Florida
  • Jeffery W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute
  • David V. Kerns, Jr., Olin College of Engineering
  • Robert S. Keynton, University of Louisville
  • Dennis K. Killinger, University of South Florida
  • Kwang J. Kim, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Wayne H. Knox, University of Rochester
  • Philip T. Kortum, Rice University
  • Philip T. Krein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • John J. La Scala, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Jonathan J. Langberg, Emory University
  • Sang Yup Lee, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Fred C. Lee, Virginia Tech
  • Eric C. Leuthardt, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology
  • Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California, Berkeley
  • Chih-Yuan Lu, National Taiwan University
  • Zhenqiang Ma, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michele Marcolongo, Drexel University
  • Laura Marcu, University of California, Davis
  • R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University
  • Gary S. Margules, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mary Helen McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Kishor C. Mehta, Texas Tech University
  • Deirdre R. Meldrum, Arizona State University
  • Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
  • Gregory Moller, University of Idaho
  • Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., University of Maryland
  • Shouleh Nikzad, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • John R. Nottingham, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic
  • Mariappan P. Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Christopher R. Parish, The Australian National University
  • Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dennis W. Prather, University of Delaware
  • Paul R. Prucnal, Princeton University
  • Nirmala Ramanujam, Duke University
  • Jennifer L. Rexford, Princeton University
  • Kenner C. Rice, National Institutes of Health
  • Camillo Ricordi, University of Miami
  • Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Bruce R. Rosen, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Barbara O. Rothbaum, Emory University
  • Jonathan M. Rothberg, Yale University
  • Max F. Rothschild, Iowa State University
  • Clinton T. Rubin, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Henry Samueli, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine
  • Ulrich S. Schubert, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
  • Paul A. Seib, Kansas State University
  • Terrence J. Sejnowski, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mohammad Shahidehpour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Yun-Qing Shi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Subhash L. Shinde, University of Notre Dame
  • Richard W. Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Krishna P. Singh, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hyongsok T. Soh, Stanford University
  • Steven L. Stice, University of Georgia
  • Steven L. Suib, University of Connecticut
  • Russell H. Taylor, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jeffrey A. Toretsky, Georgetown University
  • Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh and The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Robert Vince, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew J. Viterbi, University of Southern California
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, Duke University
  • Scott A. Waldman, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Thomas A. Waldmann, National Cancer Institute
  • Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Fei Wang, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Scott C. Weaver, The University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Thomas J. Webster, Northeastern University
  • Chin-Long Wey, National Chiao Tung University
  • Lorne Whitehead, The University of British Columbia
  • Cheryl L. Willman, The University of New Mexico
  • Alan N. Willson, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Teresa K. Woodruff, Northwestern University
  • Amy E. Wright, Florida Atlantic University
  • Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley
  • Paul Yager, University of Washington
  • Jackie Y. Ying, Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Bin Yu, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
  • Mona E. Zaghloul, The George Washington University
  • Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University
  • Lynn Zechiedrich, Baylor College of Medicine

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. UTILITY PATENTS FOR 2016 ANNOUNCED

Top University Patent Holders Unveiled in Report by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 has been announced by The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data is obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to compile the report which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report, which has been published each year since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, collects the rankings by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report can be found at: www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes, products and treatments which provide significant societal benefit as well as generate job creation that sustains and helps grow our local, regional and global economy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “It is an honor to recognize the top patent holders through this report in collaboration with IPO for the fifth consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2016 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, California Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, The University of Texas System, University of Michigan, and Columbia University.

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NAI CONFERENCE TO BRING WORLD RENOWNED ACADEMIC INVENTORS AND ASPIRING INNOVATORS TO BOSTON

The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 5-7

BOSTON, April 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Nearly 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Boston April 5-7 for the Sixth Annual Conference. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, IBM’s most prolific female inventor, and H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The meeting also will include the NAI’s inaugural Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s sixth annual conference is “Recognizing Pillars of Academic Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Changing the Academic Innovation Landscape, Issues Relating to Public Policy and Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Drive the Future of Innovation. Presenters include academic luminaries among the NAI’s members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

The NAI will induct the newly elected Fellows on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“It is an honor to once again participate in the NAI’s Annual Conference and the induction of some of our nation’s most esteemed academic inventors,” Hirshfeld said. “It is extremely gratifying to watch the NAI grow into one of the leading organizations that promotes invention by emphasizing the role of patents. I look forward to honoring the newest class of NAI Fellows and their vital contributions to society.”

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NAI FELLOWS AMONG FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Four NAI Fellows Recognized for Innovative Contributions to State of Florida

TAMPA, Fla. – Four National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows are among the eight inventors elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the nation.

NAI Fellows elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame include:

Issa Batarseh, director of the Energy System Integration Division at the Florida Power Electronics Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Central Florida, was elected for innovative research which led to the creation of the first compact single solar photovoltaic (PV) panel.

Kenneth M. Ford, co-founder and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, was elected for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence and human-centered computing.

Richard D. Gitlin, State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida, was elected for his inventive research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems.

T. Dwayne McCay, president and CEO of the Florida Institute of Technology, is being inducted along with his wife, Mary Helen McCay, for their novel approaches to laser induced surface improvements.

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame was recognized by the Florida Senate in 2014 with a resolution sponsored by Senator Jeff Brandes that commended the Hall of Fame “for its commitment to honoring inventors and celebrating innovation, discovery, and excellence.” The Hall of Fame is located at the University of South Florida in Tampa and supported, in part, by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The newly elected Hall of Fame innovators be inducted at the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame 4th Annual Induction Ceremony & Gala on Sep. 8, 2017, at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

A complete list of Florida Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, including biographical information, is available here: www.FloridaInvents.org.

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BILL INTRODUCED TO GRANT FEDERAL CHARTER TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS

Congressman Dennis Ross Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Recognize the NAI’s Role in Advancing Academic Innovation

TAMPA, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – U.S. Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-FL-15) has introduced H.R. 976, a bill to grant federal charter to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). This bipartisan legislation would recognize the importance of the NAI’s mission of advancing a culture where academic invention and innovation is celebrated for its role in fueling our nation’s economy.

The NAI is a non-profit member organization comprised of more than 240 U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with more than 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows.

H.R. 976 would provide an honorific designation symbolizing the significance of the NAI’s mission, goals and objectives in benefiting the public. The charter would also allow NAI members to be called upon as advisors by any department of the government. NAI members are contributors to fields including medicine, cybersecurity, veteran’s research, and engineering among many others.

The NAI Fellows Program has 757 Fellows worldwide representing more than 229 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in July 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with more than $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“NAI members among our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies and translating them into innovative products, processes, cures, and treatments, for the betterment of society,” Ross said, “I am proud to introduce this important bill to help further the mission of the NAI and allow their members to serve our government as subject matter experts on innovation, intellectual property, translational research and commercialization.”

The NAI is seeking additional support for this bill which currently has two original co-sponsors including: Daniel Lipinski [IL-3] and Rep. Kathy Castor [FL-14].

“We are very grateful to Congressman Ross and the supporting co-sponsors for introducing this important charter bill which recognizes the vital role academic innovation plays in moving our nation forward,” said Paul R. Sanberg, the NAI’s founder and president and the Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation & Economic Development at the University of South Florida.

“For generations, America’s academic inventors have been at the forefront of modernizing every aspect of our lives and keeping our nation economically strong and competitive. A federal charter for the National Academy of Inventors serves the public good in supporting intellectual property, translational research and commercialization. We are honored to be considered for this recognition and to continue the NAI’s work in supporting and advancing the cause of innovation and invention.”

For more information on how to encourage your congressional delegation to support this initiative, please contact Keara Leach at 813-974-5862, [email protected].

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2016 FELLOWS

Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 94 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 376 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 28 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 45 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 28 Nobel Laureates, 216 AAAS Fellows, 126 IEEE Fellows, and 116 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in Jul. 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with over $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

On 6 Apr. 2017, the 2016 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Andrew H. Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“I look forward to welcoming and honoring the 2016 class of Fellows to Boston in April,” said Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering at Northeastern University and NAI Fellow. “The NAI has once again unveiled a prolific group of academic inventors who produce vitally important discoveries for the betterment of society.”

“With each year I continue to be amazed by the caliber of individuals named as NAI Fellows and the 2016 class is no exception,” said U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld. “Congratulations to this very deserving group of distinguished academic innovators. I was honored to once again serve as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee and look forward to recognizing this new group of innovative leaders at the induction ceremony this spring.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to innovation in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 Jan. 2017 issue, and in upcoming issues of Inventors Digest and NAI journal Technology and Innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows were evaluated by the 2016 Selection Committee included 19 members, comprising NAI Fellows, recipients of U.S. National Medals, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“It is exciting to see the NAI Fellows Program continue to grow and honor the world’s most impactful academic inventors each year,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The 2016 Fellows exude innovative excellence and we feel truly privileged to welcome them to the Academy and recognize their remarkable contributions to discovery and invention.”

2016 Elected NAI Fellows

  • David Akopian, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kamal S. Ali, Jackson State University
  • A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carl R. Alving, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Hamid Arastoopour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Arsenault, Tufts University
  • B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University
  • Zhenan Bao, Stanford University
  • Richard G. Baraniuk, Rice University
  • Francis Barany, Cornell University
  • Jean-Marie Basset, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Paula J. Bates, University of Louisville
  • Craig C. Beeson, Medical University of South Carolina
  • K. Darrell Berlin, Oklahoma State University
  • Sarit B. Bhaduri, The University of Toledo
  • Pallab K. Bhattacharya, University of Michigan
  • Dieter H. Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • Christopher N. Bowman, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Barbara D. Boyan, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Mindy M. Brashears, Texas Tech University
  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ruben G. Carbonell, North Carolina State University
  • John F. Carpenter, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Raghunath V. Chaudhari, The University of Kansas
  • Liang-Gee Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Simon R. Cherry, University of California, Davis
  • Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Adrienne E. Clarke, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Rita R. Colwell, University of Maryland
  • Diane J. Cook, Washington State University
  • Peter A. Crooks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Riccardo Dalla-Favera, Columbia University
  • Suman Datta, University of Notre Dame
  • Delbert E. Day, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roger A. de la Torre, University of Missouri
  • Stephen W. Director, Northeastern University
  • Jeffrey L. Duerk, Case Western Reserve University
  • James L. Dye, Michigan State University
  • Richard L. Ehman, Mayo Clinic
  • Gary A. Eiceman, New Mexico State University
  • Ali Emadi, McMaster University, Canada
  • Ronald M. Evans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Stanley Falkow, Stanford University
  • Hany Farid, Dartmouth College
  • Shane M. Farritor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Philippe M. Fauchet, Vanderbilt University
  • Denise L. Faustman, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • David R. Fischell, Cornell University
  • Vincent A. Fischetti, The Rockefeller University
  • David P. Fries, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Kenneth G. Furton, Florida International University
  • Kanad Ghose, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Juan E. Gilbert, University of Florida
  • Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco
  • Herbert Gleiter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Dan M. Goebel, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Forouzan Golshani, California State University, Long Beach
  • Lorne M. Golub, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • John B. Goodenough, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael Graetzel, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Robert J. Greenberg, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research
  • Richard M. Greenwald, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick G. Halbur, Iowa State University
  • Henry R. Halperin, Johns Hopkins University
  • Amy E. Herr, University of California, Berkeley
  • D. Craig Hooper, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Edward A. Hoover, Colorado State University
  • Oliver Yoa-Pu Hu, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan
  • David Huang, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Mark S. Humayun, University of Southern California
  • Joseph P. Iannotti, Cleveland Clinic
  • Enrique Iglesia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sungho Jin, University of California, San Diego
  • Barry W. Johnson, University of Virginia
  • William L. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • John L. Junkins, Texas A&M University
  • Michelle Khine, University of California, Irvine
  • John Klier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Thomas J. Kodadek, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Harold L. Kohn, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Steven M. Kuznicki, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Enrique J. Lavernia, University of California, Irvine
  • Nicholas J. Lawrence, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Leslie A. Leinwand, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Frances S. Ligler, North Carolina State University
  • Yilu Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jennifer K. Lodge, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Mandi J. Lopez, Louisiana State University
  • Gabriel P. López, The University of New Mexico
  • Surya K. Mallapragada, Iowa State University
  • Seth R. Marder, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University
  • Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation-India
  • Kouki Matsuse, Meiji University, Japan
  • Martin M. Matzuk, Baylor University
  • T. Dwayne McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • James W. McGinity, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Thomas J. Meade, Northwestern University
  • Katrina L. Mealey, Washington State University
  • Edward W. Merrill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Paul L. Modrich, Duke University
  • David J. Mooney, Harvard University
  • H. Keith Moo-Young, Washington State University Tri-Cities
  • Israel J. Morejon, University of South Florida
  • Harold L. Moses, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph R. Moskal, Northwestern University
  • Nazim Z. Muradov, University of Central Florida
  • Nicholas Muzyczka, University of Florida
  • Lakshmi S. Nair, University of Connecticut
  • Shrikanth S. Narayanan, University of Southern California
  • Ellen Ochoa, NASA Johnson Space Center
  • Erin K. O’Shea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Francis A. Papay, Cleveland Clinic
  • Kevin J. Parker, University of Rochester
  • Yvonne J. Paterson, University of Pennsylvania
  • George N. Pavlakis, National Institutes of Health
  • Kenneth H. Perlin, New York University
  • Nasser Peyghambarian, The University of Arizona
  • Gary A. Piazza, University of South Alabama
  • Christophe Pierre, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Michael C. Pirrung, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael V. Pishko, University of Wyoming
  • Garth Powis, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Paras N. Prasad, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ronald T. Raines, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Michael P. Rastatter, East Carolina University
  • Jacob Richter, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Richard E. Riman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Andrew G. Rinzler, University of Florida
  • Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University
  • Nabeel A. Riza, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Kenneth J. Rothschild, Boston University
  • Stuart H. Rubin, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center
  • Linda J. Saif, The Ohio State University
  • Sudeep Sarkar, University of South Florida
  • John T. Schiller, National Institutes of Health
  • Diane G. Schmidt, University of Cincinnati
  • Wayne S. Seames, University of North Dakota
  • Michael S. Shur, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University
  • Mrityunjay Singh, Ohio Aerospace Institute
  • Kamalesh K. Sirkar, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • David R. Smith, Duke University
  • James E. Smith, West Virginia University
  • Terrance P. Snutch, The University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University
  • Gerald Sonnenfeld, The University of Rhode Island
  • James S. Speck, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Bruce W. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman University
  • Kenneth S. Suslick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark J. Suto, Southern Research Institute
  • Yu-Chong Tai, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Tansu, Lehigh University
  • Fleur T. Tehrani, California State University, Fullerton
  • Marc T. Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford University
  • Madhukar (Mathew) L. Thakur, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Mehmet Toner, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan T. Vilcek, New York University
  • Anil V. Virkar, The University of Utah
  • John F. Wager, Oregon State University
  • William R. Wagner, University of Pittsburgh
  • Isiah M. Warner, Louisiana State University
  • John D. Weete, Auburn University
  • Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University
  • Ralph Weissleder, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas M. Weller, University of South Florida
  • Jennifer L. West, Duke University
  • Amnon Yariv, California Institute of Technology
  • Yun Yen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Warren M. Zapol, Massachusetts General Hospital

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS FOR 2015 ANNOUNCED

NAI and IPO Release Report on Top University Patent Holders for Fourth Time

TAMPA, Fla. (Jul. 12, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2015. The report utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent.

“The rate at which our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies is growing faster than ever and it is an honor to recognize these institutions for their amazing work,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We thank the IPO for collaborating with the NAI for the fourth year in a row on this ranking which confirms the importance of supporting research and innovation within academia.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, The University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan.

“IPO is proud to once again release this important report with the NAI to highlight the tremendous work in patents being done at universities,” said IPO Executive Director, Mark W. Lauroesch. “Inventive ecosystems continue to grow around universities, sparking a culture in which academics and innovation go hand-in-hand producing technologies which stimulate not only local and regional economies but the global economy.”

IPO’s 33rd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2015 was also recently released. The top 10 universities on the 2015 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2015 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS SIGN MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH US PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

NAI and USPTO officials signed agreement during NAI’s Fifth Annual Conference

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (April 26, 2016) – Russell Slifer, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and deputy director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), signed a Memorandum of Agreement during the NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, the closing event for the NAI’s fifth annual conference on April 15, 2016.

The agreement outlines the opportunity for the USPTO and the NAI to work closely on mutually beneficial projects to enrich education outreach, honors and awards, and programs relating to intellectual property. The agreement includes a commitment from the NAI to host its annual meeting every other year at USPTO headquarters.

“It has been our pleasure at the USPTO, for the last five years to have a relationship with the Academy and it is my pleasure also to sign our Memorandum of Agreement,” said Slifer. “We will continue to cooperate to host events and awards. The NAI annual meeting will continue to be held here every other year, which will allow for our employees to meet with NAI members and Fellows to discuss how the work they are doing comes together to help the nation and innovators around the world.”

David Kappos, former Under Secretary of Commerce and previous director of the USPTO, embraced the NAI soon after it was founded in 2010 and suggested the need for a higher level program for leading academic inventors to be honored and recognized for their contributions to society.

In his speech at the 2012 NAI annual meeting in Tampa, Kappos said, “The NAI is a breakthrough for our country. It couldn’t be more timely to have an organization like this to be championing innovation.”

“We are very grateful that the USPTO has provided vital support to the NAI since our inception,” said Sanberg. “We are pleased to announce the signing of this Memorandum of Agreement which solidifies our important friendship and we look forward to a bright future of collaborations.”

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FELLOWS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS INDUCTED AT UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

2015 keynote speech provided by U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) – U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld provided the keynote address for the induction ceremony of the 2015 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors at the NAI’s fifth annual conference, held this year in Washington D.C. on Apr. 14-15.

Over 325 inventors and academic leaders attended the conference, which featured presentations and panels by more than 30 distinguished scientists and innovators including keynote addresses by Victor J. Dzau, President of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow; Cristin A. Dorgelo, Chief of Staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; and Emery N. Brown, MIT Professor and NAI Fellow.

“It was an honor to participate in the NAI’s fifth annual meeting as a featured speaker,” said Brown. “The NAI fills a vital need by bringing together innovators from across disciplines to be recognized for their groundbreaking contributions in research, patents and commercialization. I am honored to be a Fellow of this important national organization.”

At the ceremony held on Apr. 15 at the USPTO, Hirshfeld and Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI and Charter Fellow, presented the 2015 class of Fellows with a trophy, medal and rosette pin honoring their contributions as academic inventors. Of the 168 innovators elected to the 2015 class, more than 130 were in attendance.

“I am personally inspired and grateful to be amongst this distinguished group and join in recognizing you today,” said Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, during his keynote address. “You have truly enhanced the quality of life for our nation and we thank you for your innovative contributions. As inventive researchers who are leaders in all fields of academia, we are eager to learn from your expertise and collaborate on future educational initiatives.”

The NAI Fellows Program has 582 Fellows worldwide representing more than 190 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 20,000 issued U.S. patents.

The collective NAI Fellows now include more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the three branches of the National Academy of Sciences, 27 Nobel Laureates, 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 36 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 14 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows among other awards and distinctions.

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors,” said Illinois Institute of Technology President Alan W. Cramb. “Being named in the same category as other globally distinguished innovators and inventors in the NAI is a privilege.”

Nominations for 2016 Fellows will open Jul. 1 and can be submitted online through Oct. 1 at AcademyofInventors.org. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted and honored at the 2017 NAI Annual Conference, to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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U.S. COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE PRESIDENT SPEAK AT NAI CONFERENCE

The 5th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 14-15 in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 11, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors will celebrate its fifth annual conference by returning to Washington, D.C., Apr. 14-15, 2016. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents and Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow.

The theme of the NAI’s fifth conference is “Building on Foundations of Innovation” to explore the interaction between the United States’ history of change and the modern culture and leadership of innovation.

Keynote speeches by Cristin Dorgelo, chief of staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Emery Brown, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NAI Fellow, along with presentations and panels on innovation by more than 35 prolific scientists and academic leaders, round out the conference program.

Highlights also include a signature gala at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the induction of the 2015 Fellows of the NAI—the conference’s closing event—at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, with a keynote address by Hirshfeld.

“It is a pleasure to commemorate the Academy’s milestone fifth annual meeting by welcoming the NAI back to Washington,” said Hirshfeld. “I look forward to recognizing the new distinguished class of NAI Fellows. These true champions of academic invention have made tremendous contributions to society through their amazing innovations.”

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2015 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators honored with prestigious distinction

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 leaders of invention and innovation to Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing over 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2015 Fellows account for 5,368 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, NAM), 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 32 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 27 Nobel Laureates, 14 Lemelson-MIT Prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on 15 Apr. 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

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2015 Elected NAI Fellows

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dean P. Alderucci, The University of Chicago
  • Jayakrishna Ambati, University of Kentucky
  • Iver E. Anderson, Iowa State University
  • Kristi S. Anseth, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Allen W. Apblett, Oklahoma State University
  • Charles J. Arntzen, Arizona State University
  • Harry A. Atwater, Jr., California Inst. of Technology
  • Lorne A. Babiuk, University of Alberta
  • John M. Ballato, Clemson University
  • John S. Baras, University of Maryland
  • Issa Batarseh, University of Central Florida
  • Ray H. Baughman, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Angela M. Belcher, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Stephen J. Benkovic, The Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Shekhar Bhansali, Florida International University
  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • John D. Birdwell, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Kenneth J. Blank, Rowan University
  • Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University
  • John E. Bowers, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gary L. Bowlin, University of Memphis
  • C. Jeffrey Brinker, The University of New Mexico
  • Richard B. Brown, The University of Utah
  • Emery N. Brown, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Milton L. Brown, Georgetown University
  • Steven R.J. Brueck, The University of New Mexico
  • Joe C. Campbell, University of Virginia
  • Selim A. Chacour, University of South Florida
  • Mau-Chung Frank Chang, Nat. Chiao Tung Univ.
  • Shu Chien, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Diana S. Chow, University of Houston
  • Chung K. (David) Chu, University of Georgia
  • Yoginder P. Chugh, Southern Illinois University
  • William J. Clancey, IHMC
  • Katrina Cornish, The Ohio State University
  • Delos M. (Toby) Cosgrove III, Cleveland Clinic
  • Alan W. Cramb, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Benjamin F. Cravatt III, The Scripps Research Inst.
  • Roy Curtiss III, University of Florida
  • Paul D. Dapkus, University of Southern California
  • John G. Daugman, University of Cambridge
  • Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology
  • Robert C. Dean, Jr., Dartmouth College
  • Atam P. Dhawan, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Duane B. Dimos, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • David M. Eddy, University of South Florida
  • Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania
  • Antonio Facchetti, Northwestern University
  • Rudolf Faust, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland
  • Christodoulos A. Floudas, Texas A&M University
  • Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri
  • Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
  • Jean M.J. Fréchet, KAUST
  • Richard H. Frenkiel, Rutgers University
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Stanford University
  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, University of Missouri
  • Sir Andre K. Geim, The University of Manchester
  • George Georgiou, The University of Texas at Austin
  • John C. Gore, Vanderbilt University
  • Venu Govindaraju, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ali Hajimiri, California Inst. of Technology
  • Naomi J. Halas, Rice University
  • Andrew D. Hamilton, University of Oxford
  • Wayne W. Hanna, University of Georgia
  • Florence P. Haseltine, National Institutes of Health
  • Charlotte A.E. Hauser, KAUST
  • Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • M. Frederick Hawthorne, University of Missouri
  • Barton F. Haynes, Duke University
  • Richard F. Heck, University of Delaware
  • Andrew B. Holmes, The University of Melbourne
  • Rush D. Holt, AAAS
  • H. Robert Horvitz, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Chenming C. Hu, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Leon D. Iasemidis, Louisiana Tech University
  • Mir Imran, University of Pittsburgh
  • Donald E. Ingber, Harvard University
  • Chennupati Jagadish, The Australian National Univ.
  • Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University
  • Kristina M. Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Joseph S. Kalinowski, East Carolina University
  • Aaron V. Kaplan, Dartmouth College
  • Usha N. Kasid, Georgetown University
  • Kenneth W. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University
  • Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University
  • Steven J. Kubisen, The George Washington Univ.
  • Donald W. Landry, Columbia University
  • Se-Jin Lee, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sunggyu Lee, Ohio University
  • Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke University
  • G. Douglas Letson, Moffitt Cancer & Research Inst.
  • Jennifer A. Lewis, Harvard University
  • Guifang Li, University of Central Florida
  • James C. Liao, Univ. of California, Los Angeles
  • John S. (Pete) Lollar III, Emory University
  • Anthony M. Lowman, Rowan University
  • Rodney S. Markin, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University
  • Dean F. Martin, University of South Florida
  • Helen S. Mayberg, Emory University
  • Patrick L. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Edith G. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center
  • Thomas E. Milner, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Umesh K. Mishra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Somenath Mitra, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Andreas F. Molisch, University of Southern California
  • Ramani Narayan, Michigan State University
  • Alan C. Nelson, Arizona State University
  • Kyriacos C. Nicolaou, Rice University
  • David R. Nygren, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • Richard M. Osgood, Jr., Columbia University
  • Alyssa Panitch, Purdue University
  • Heloise A. Pereira, OUHSC
  • William M. Pierce, Jr., University of Louisville
  • John M. Poate, Colorado School of Mines
  • H. Vincent, Poor, Princeton University
  • Ann Progulske-Fox, University of Florida
  • Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington
  • Kaushik Rajashekara, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas
  • Jahangir S. Rastegar, Stony Brook University
  • A. Hari Reddi, Univ. of California, Davis
  • E. Albert Reece, University of Maryland
  • Kenneth L. Reifsnider, The Univ. of TX at Arlington
  • Jasper D. Rine, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Ajeet Rohatgi, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Stephen D. Russell, SPAWAR
  • Michael J. Sailor, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Bahgat G. Sammakia, Binghamton University
  • Andrew V. Schally, University of Miami
  • Paul R. Schimmel, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Peter G. Schultz, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University
  • Jonathan L. Sessler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Mohsen Shahinpour, University of Maine
  • Benjamin A. Shneiderman, University of Maryland
  • Marvin J. Slepian, The University of Arizona
  • Kwok-Fai So, The University of Hong Kong
  • Richard A. Soref, Univ. of Massachusetts Boston
  • Pramod K. Srivastava, University of Connecticut
  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati
  • Valentino J. Stella, The University of Kansas
  • Galen D. Stucky, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bala Subramaniam, The University of Kansas
  • R. Michael Tanner, APLU
  • Guillermo J. Tearney, Harvard University
  • Stephen Tomlinson, Medical Univ. of South Carolina
  • James M. Tour, Rice University
  • Kalliat T. Valsaraj, Louisiana State University
  • Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Purdue University
  • Norman J. Wagner III, University of Delaware
  • Yong Wang, Washington State University
  • James A. Wells, Univ. of California, San Francisco
  • Jay F. Whitacre, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caroline C. Whitacre, The Ohio State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, Univ. of Alaska Anchorage
  • Edward D. Wolf, Cornell University
  • Paul K. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • James C. Wyant, The University of Arizona
  • Pan-Chyr Yang, National Taiwan University
  • Yu-Dong Yao, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Martin L. Yarmush, Rutgers University
  • Jim P. Zheng, Florida State University

NAI AND IPO RELEASE TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (June 16, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

“The NAI is delighted to be releasing this list of the leading innovative universities in the world in conjunction with the IPO for the third year in a row,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “The data once again proves that innovation based on university technology continues to be a key factor in economic development and a fundamental element to the success of a university.”

In conjunction, the IPO will soon be releasing their 32nd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations worldwide that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2014. The top 13 universities on the 2014 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2014 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

“Patents make enormous contributions to U.S innovation, leading to more jobs in U.S. industry and new strength in the economy,” said IPO Executive Director Herbert C. Wamsley. “These innovations help solidify the transfer of cutting-edge research to the marketplace, producing revenue and potentially increasing research funding by providing corporations and businesses the incentive to invest in university projects.”

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2014 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research, or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected]

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2014 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators elected to high honor

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 16, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 170 distinguished innovators to NAI Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 414, representing more than 150 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions.

Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leadership of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 208 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, IOM), 21 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 16 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, 10 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Science, 21 Nobel Laureates, 11 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 112 AAAS Fellows, and 62 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Collectively, the 414 NAI Fellows hold nearly 14,000 U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on Mar. 20, 2015, as part of the 4th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Deputy Commissioner for Patent Operations Andrew Faile will be providing the keynote address for the induction ceremony. Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, newly designed medal, and rosette pin in honor of their outstanding accomplishments.

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NAI MEMBER INSTITUTIONS DOMINATE NSF I-CORPS TEAM AWARDS

Eight of the top 12 universities nationally are NAI members

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 25, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors today recognized NAI Member Institutions with teams selected in 2014 for the Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Team program by the National Science Foundation. The 82 teams from NAI member universities comprise 54 percent of all teams nationwide receiving I-Corps Team awards this year.

Among the top 12 universities receiving the awards, eight are from NAI member universities, including, at #1, University of Michigan with 13 teams; #3, University of South Florida with five teams; #4, Carnegie-Mellon University with four teams; and tied for #5 with three teams each, Arizona State University, Florida State University, Lehigh University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nationally, 153 teams from 91 universities were selected for I-Corps Team awards in 2014. Each team receives a $50,000 grant and participates in an I-Corps Teams curriculum designed to provide hands-on, immersive learning for researchers on what it takes to successfully transition research out of the laboratory into commercially feasible products that benefit society.

“We are proud our Member Institutions are leading the way in this groundbreaking program.” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors and a AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador. “Their work contributes to economic prosperity in their communities, states and our nation.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) established the I-Corps Teams program to identify NSF-funded researchers, and provide them mentoring and funding in order to accelerate the translation of knowledge derived from fundamental research into emerging products and services.

“This is a powerful economic development initiative by the NSF,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development at Arizona State University, one of the top 12 universities receiving awards this year. “The I-Corps Team program is designed to create a national innovation ecology and will have a high impact.”

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NAI member institutions receiving NSI I-Corps Team Awards in 2014

Arizona State University

Auburn University

Boise State University

Carnegie-Mellon University

Colorado State University

Columbia University

Cornell University

Drexel University

Florida International University

Florida State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana Tech University

Missouri University of Science and Technology

New Mexico State University

New York University

Ohio State University

Oklahoma State University

Purdue University

Rutgers University New Brunswick

Stevens Institute of Technology

SUNY at Buffalo

SUNY at Stony Brook

Temple University

Texas Tech University

University of Akron

University of Arizona

University of California-Berkeley

University of California-Davis

University of Cincinnati Main Campus

University of Florida

University of Georgia Research Foundation Inc

University of Houston

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky Research Foundation

University of Maryland College Park

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Michigan Ann Arbor

University of North Texas

University of South Carolina at Columbia

University of South Florida

University of Toledo

University of Wisconsin-Madison

WHY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BRINGS UNIVERSITIES
‘MORE THAN MONEY’

Many benefits of tech transfer to universities beyond revenues from licenses & royalties

TAMPA, Fla. (June 26, 2014) – Academic technology transfer – the process of moving research from the lab to the market – provides intrinsic benefits to universities that go far beyond any potential revenues from licenses and royalties.

So say the authors, from five universities across the country and the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), in a new article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) that appears in the current issue of Technology and Innovation and is available Open Access.

“More than Money: The Exponential Impact of Academic Technology Transfer” is the work of lead author Valerie Landrio McDevitt, former associate vice president at the University of South Florida (USF) and current executive director of AUTM, and co-authors, Joelle Mendez-Hinds of USF, David Winwood of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Vinit Nijhawan of Boston University (BU), Todd Sherer of Emory University, John F. Ritter of Princeton University, and Paul R. Sanberg of USF and the NAI. USF, UAB, BU and Emory are all Charter Member Institutions of the NAI.

According to the authors, the positive benefits of technology transfer for universities can be significant, including: a vibrant culture of entrepreneurship that promotes recruitment and retention of faculty, increased student success through participation in real world research, public benefits from applied research that seeks to address global challenges, economic development, increased opportunities for funding through inter-institutional and interdisciplinary grants, new start-ups and international research relationships, and increased prestige and fundraising from a stronger university brand.

“In the academic setting, technology transfer is a critical component for facilitating and sparking innovation within universities and helping to connect universities with commercial partners in the community,” says co-author Paul R. Sanberg, who is founder and president of the NAI. “Technology transfer can be truly transformational to a university and to the community.”

The authors:

Valerie Landrio McDevitt, a registered patent attorney, is executive director of the Association of University Technology Manager (AUTM). She received her J.D. at Emory University School of Law. Prior to joining AUTM, she served as the associate vice president for technology transfer and business incubation at the University of South Florida. She previously worked as a science advisor with a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., and participated in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellowship program.

Joelle Mendez-Hinds is a patent marketing intern in the Technology Transfer Office/Division of Patents & Licensing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

David Winwood is chief executive officer of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Foundation and senior associate vice president for Economic Development and Innovation Alliances. Prior to joining UAB, Winwood served North Carolina State University and The Ohio State University. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness Regional Innovation Initiative Expert Committee and serves on boards of directors for the Council on Governmental Relations, Biotechnology Association of Alabama, Birmingham Venture Club, Innovation Depot, and TechBirmingham.

Vinit Nijhawan, is managing director of the Office of Technology Development and director of Enterprise Programs at the Institute of Technology at Boston University, Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at BU. He received his B.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. He has more than twenty-five years of experience building five startups and was CEO of three of them. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of TiE Global, a non-profit that fosters entrepreneurship globally; special assistant to the vice president of research; and director of the Kindle Mentoring Program at BU.

Todd Sherer, is associate vice president for research administration and executive director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in toxicology at Washington State University. Prior to joining Emory, he was director of the Office of Technology and Research Collaborations at Oregon Health & Science University. He served as president of AUTM and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

John F. Ritter, is director of the Office of Technology Licensing at Princeton University. Prior to joining Princeton, he served as a senior licensing professional at Rutgers University. He is secretary of the Review Panel on Conflict of Interest in Research. He received his J.D. from Rutgers School of Law and his M.B.A from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Paul R. Sanberg, is senior vice president for research and innovation and Distinguished University Professor at the University of South Florida, and founder and president of the National Academy of Inventors. He is an inventor on over 30 licensed health-related U.S. patents and a highly cited author with more than 600 publications. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, NAI, Royal Societies (Medicine, Chemistry and Public Health), AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador, and serves on the evaluation committee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

 

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic InnovationSeventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Lee, University of California, Irvine
  • Anna M. Leese de Escobar, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Warren J. Leonard, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
  • Johannes A. Lercher, Technical University of Munich
  • Teik C. Lim, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Craig W. Lindsley, Vanderbilt University/Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery
  • Elizabeth G. Loboa, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Ted L. Maddess, Australian National University
  • Elizabeth M. McNally, Northwestern University
  • Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ellis Meng, University of Southern California
  • Joachim Messing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Lalit K. Mestha, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Lyle R. Middendorf, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Shaker A. Mousa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
  • William P. Murphy, Jr., Florida International University
  • William L. Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Prakash Nagarkatti, University of South Carolina
  • Nathan Newman, Arizona State University
  • Bert W. O’Malley, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Aydogan Ozcan, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia University
  • Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University
  • Roderic I. Pettigrew, Texas A&M University
  • Apparao M. Rao, Clemson Nanomaterials Institute/Clemson University
  • Theodore S. Rappaport, New York University
  • Rafael Reif, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joshua Rokach, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Yoram Rudy, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wheeler Ruml, University of New Hampshire
  • Thomas P. Russell, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jagannathan Sarangapani, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Vinod Sarin, Boston University
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College
  • Steven J. Sasson, University of South Florida
  • Christine E. Schmidt, University of Florida
  • Zheng John Shen, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Thomas E. Shenk, Princeton University
  • Mark B. Shiflett, University of Kansas
  • Michael L. Simpson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory/The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Koji Sode, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Costas M. Soukoulis, Iowa State University/Ames Laboratory
  • John W. Spirk, Cleveland Clinic
  • Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • William Studier, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University
  • Koduvayur P. Subbalakshmi, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Bruce A. Sullenger, Duke University
  • Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University
  • Jing Sun, University of Michigan
  • Yu Sun, University of Toronto
  • Wanchun Tang, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego
  • Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • David A. Tirrell, California Institute of Technology
  • Don M. Tucker, University of Oregon
  • Jeffrey S. Vitter, The University of Mississippi
  • Israel E. Wachs, Lehigh University
  • Albert Wang, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael S. Waterman, University of Southern California
  • Alan W. Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Louis M. Weiner, Georgetown University
  • Robert G. Wilhelm, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Yushan Yan, University of Delaware
  • Jian Yang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eui-Hyeok Yang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Mark H. Yim, The University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael J. Yost, Medical University of South Carolina
  • James M. Zavislan, University of Rochester
  • Ruiwen Zhang, University of Houston
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine

Beyond Accessibility

Technology & Innovation’s latest issue, “Technologies for Disabilities,” focuses on new solutions and new paradigms for assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2018) Technology & Innovation (T&I), journal of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), has released a new special topic issue titled “Technologies for Disabilities.” The issue delves into revolutionary devices, cutting-edge materials and processes, and new theories on designing for users with disabilities.

In every sector of modern society, technological advancements have transformed the way the world works, travels, communicates, and learns. However, not all have been equal beneficiaries of these innovations.

One billion people – the 15 percent of the world’s population who have some form of disability – have largely been left behind by technologies designed for and targeted towards people without disabilities. The new issue of T&I, (20:1-2) (full text) focuses on researchers who are attempting to correct this disparity by creating revolutionary new devices and radically changing how we design assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

“Enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities has been the goal of much of my research, and it is the goal of this special issue as well,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, vice president of the NAI and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “By designing technology where accessibility is the goal rather than an afterthought, we are setting the stage for better and more inclusive technological solutions.”

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

Two Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors Win Nobel Prizes

James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2018) – James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Allison was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, sharing the honor with Dr. Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Allison and Honjo received the prize “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.”

“I was trying to understand how T cells worked,” Allison told Adam Smith, an interviewer for TheNobelPrize.org. “I figured out this one thing about this negative regulator, and I had this idea that if we just took that off, maybe it would do a better job of killing cancer cells. Turns out it works.”

Allison was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2017. He also received the Wolf Prize in Medicine in 2017, and he received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in 2015.

Arnold received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the directed evolution of enzymes.” She conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes in 1993.

“I was able to look at the problem with a totally fresh set of eyes – a problem that had challenged people since the techniques were available,” Arnold said in a phone interview, moments after receiving the award. “I realized that the way that most people were going about protein engineering was doomed to failure.”

Arnold has since refined the methods that are now routinely used to develop new catalysts. She was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2014. She was also inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014, and she received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2011.

“We are thrilled to congratulate Allison and Arnold on these momentous achievements,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

National Academy of Inventors Releases 2018 Activities Report

The National Academy of Inventors has released its annual Activities Report, which catalogs each of the organization’s programs, membership categories, publications and yearly events.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 2, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) published its annual Activities Report today, which highlights the organization’s major events, programs and members.

The 2018 Activities Report features two new programs: the Senior Member program and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). The Senior Member program welcomes inventors early in their careers who aspire to make an impact on the academic community. GAIN is a mentoring platform exclusively available to NAI members.

“The annual Activities Report is our chance to feature our members and the incredible work they do,” said Spencer Montgomery, NAI Director. “The report spotlights inventors at each of our Sustaining Member Institutions, reviews the 2018 Annual Meeting and explains our newest programs.”

The 2018 Activities Report includes statistics on the impact NAI Fellows make on their communities, including how many companies they have formed, how many jobs they have created and more. The report highlights the NAI’s 2018 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, D.C. last April, which brought together over 450 members of the organization.

The publication provides updates and details on each of the NAI’s programs, including the Fellows program, Senior Member program, GAIN platform, NAI Chapter program and the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It concludes with a list of each member of the 2017 class of Fellows, who were inducted at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

The 2018 Activities Report is available online. Physical copies are available upon request.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches New Membership

The National Academy of Inventors’ Senior Member program honors early-stage inventors and innovators who aspire to make a real impact on society through the patenting and commercialization processes.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 1, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has launched a new membership category, the Senior Member program. The program will recognize and honor early-stage academic inventors who aspire to make a real impact on society through invention and innovation. 

The NAI Senior Member program seeks active researchers and professionals who demonstrate success in patenting, licensing and commercialization activities, and foster a spirit of innovation through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

“The Senior Member program is an exciting addition to our existing membership,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “Inventors who seek to influence and support the academic invention ecosystem have the opportunity to join the NAI’s global network of innovators striving toward a common goal.”

Elected NAI Senior Members will have access to the NAI’s premier mentorship platform, the Global Academic Inventor Network, exclusively available to NAI members. They will also have opportunities for networking and education through NAI-led panels, meetings, and committees, including the opportunity to publish in NAI’s Technology & Innovation journal.

“This program has been carefully constructed to welcome and honor a new cadre of academic inventors into our community,” said Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. “We look forward to recognizing young innovators and academically-minded individuals in the early stages of their innovation careers who aspire to reach new heights within the invention community.”

Nominations for the NAI Senior Member program opened today, and the organization will continue to accept nomination submissions on a rolling basis. Notices of election will be announced quarterly, with the inaugural class election slated for February 2019.

Eligible individuals should hold at minimum one issued U.S. patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office which has been licensed or commercialized. As an alternative, candidates may demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding five or more U.S. patents. All nominees must be affiliated with a Member Institution of the NAI.

For more information, visit the NAI website or contact Jacquie Burckley, Senior Member Coordinator, at [email protected].

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

United States Senate Resolution Recognizes the National Academy of Inventors

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 27, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has been officially recognized by the United States Senate through Senate Resolution 620, introduced as a bipartisan measure by Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri and affirmed unanimously by the full Senate on Aug. 28, 2018. 

The resolution recognizes the NAI and honors the organization’s milestone of achieving 200 member institutions.

In addition to acknowledging the NAI’s “rapid expansion,” the resolution affirms that the Senate “supports the mission of the National Academy of Inventors [and]…acknowledges the National Academy of Inventors for its role in elevating the contributions of academic inventors across all disciplines.”

“It is an honor to be recognized by the U.S. Senate for the NAI’s success in encouraging academic innovation in the United States and internationally,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “We greatly appreciate and thank Senators Nelson and Blunt for sponsoring this resolution and ensuring its swift passage.”

The NAI was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI partners closely with the USPTO in the pursuit of this mission.

“Through the doors of the USPTO walk inventors and entrepreneurs with innovations that will spur investment, create new jobs, grow our economy, and help us achieve our highest ideals,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. “Many of these will come from the National Academy of Inventors.”

The NAI now boasts more than 4,000 individual members and fellows spanning over 250 universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes.

“We are proud of the measurable impact that the NAI and our member institutions and individual inventor members and fellows are making throughout the world,” said Sanberg.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation.www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Three NAI Fellows Inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 11, 2018) – Dr. Emery Brown, Dr. Richard Houghten and Dr. Sudipta Seal, all Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame on September 7, 2018. Seven innovators were inducted during the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

Brown, Houghten and Seal join a number of NAI Fellows who have previously received this recognition, including NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg.

“It is a momentous feeling to see that nearly half of this year’s inductees to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame are NAI Fellows,” Sanberg said. “Dr. Brown, Dr. Houghten and Dr. Seal have made an incredible impact on the innovation landscape in Florida, and we are proud to support them as they receive this well-deserved honor.”

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates those inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the United States.

“It has been wonderful to see Florida embrace and elevate its own proud history of invention through the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. “Through this organization, Florida has rightly claimed its mantel as a leader in national innovation.”

Brown is Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of anesthesiology. He holds three issued U.S. patents.

Houghten founded the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and currently serves as CEO. His research has had significant impact on the pharmaceutical industry, and his innovative approach has revolutionized drug discovery across the nation. He holds 81 issued U.S. patents.

Seal is Trustee Chair, Pegasus and University Distinguished Professor at the University of Central Florida. His expertise in materials science and engineering led to groundbreaking discoveries and therapeutic applications of nano cerium oxide in regenerative nano-medicine. He holds 48 issued U.S. patents and his technology is licensed to multiple companies.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches Global Academic Inventor Network

The National Academy of Inventors aims to connect seasoned and world-renowned academic inventors with students and other junior professionals to aid them in advancing their innovative careers. 

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 5, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) today announced the launch of the Global Academic Inventors Network (GAIN). GAIN is an international mentoring platform exclusively available to academic inventors.

NAI President Paul R. Sanberg first announced the concept of a global network at the NAI’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April 2018.

“It is our hope that this network helps ease the process for emerging inventors as they take an initial idea through the entire discovery process and, then, licensing and commercializing that technology for the benefit of society,” Sanberg said.

GAIN is one of a number of initiatives that the NAI has announced in 2018. The platform is engineered to make it easy for inventive students and faculty to connect, while giving them the tools, automation and security to bring the global invention community together and drive innovation.

“The Global Academic Inventors Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration,” said Dr. Karen J.L. Burg, member of the NAI Board of Directors. “By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasoned inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

For a limited time, NAI Sustaining Member Institutions, Chapters and Fellows will receive exclusive priority access to join GAIN. Following the initial launch stage, the NAI will open the platform to the entire NAI community.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

The Invention Gender Gap

Special topic issue explores the gender gap between men and women in inventorship, analyzing its causes, evaluating current efforts to address it, and suggesting new ideas to eliminate this disparity 

Tampa, Fla. (Jul. 16, 2018) – Statistics show that women are named as inventors on less than one in five U.S. patents. Why does this gender disparity exist, and what is being done to address it? The new issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19:4) (full text) tackles these key questions, and the papers collected here serve as a primer on the state of the invention gender gap, why it persists, and what can be done to change it.

“There is perhaps no area more crucial to explore than the gender gap in invention,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and co-editor-in-chief of T&I. “The persistence of this problem cuts us off from leveraging the full innovative potential of half of our population, thus reducing our innovative output and making us less competitive as a nation. In addition to the many articles on the gender gap, we are also taking this opportunity to honor our women NAI Fellows, as are the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Science and Technology Medals Foundation with their respective women Inductees and Laureates.”

The full issue highlights can be found at the following link: https://academyofinventors.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue-Highlights-Aesthetic-Final.pdf

 

ARTICLES INCLUDED:

  • Feminist Challenge to Gene Patents
  • Gender Data Gap: Baseline of U.S. Academic Institutions
  • Engaging Women Innovators: Analytical Support For Women Innovator Programming in University Technology Transfer
  • Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Invention and Technology Commercialization
  • On the Commercialization Path: Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Outputs among Women in STEM
  • Closing Diversity Gaps in Innovation: Gender, Race, and Income Disparities in Patenting and Commercialization of Inventions
  • Addressing the Gender Gap among Patent Holders through Invention Education Policies
  • Breaking Barriers: Female Inventors Blazing a Path Forward
  • From the USPTO: Mind the Gap—The USPTO’s Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Patenting and Innovation
  • The NAI Fellow Profile: An Interview with Dr. Michelle Khine
  • Investing in Academic Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Moving Beyond Research Funding through the NSF I-CORPS® Program
  • On the Software Patenting Controversy
  • NAI Chapter Spotlight: University of Southern California
  • Innovation in Action: Arizona State University

 

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 Announced

Top University Patent Holders Revealed in Report Authored by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla. (June 5, 2018) – The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is used to compile the report, which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

Published annually since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, the report ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO during the 2017 calendar year. The full report can be found at: https://www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/top-100-universities-2017.pdf

“The institutions on this list are doing incredible work promoting academic innovation and incubating groundbreaking technologies which exemplify the importance of technology transfer to institutional success,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are proud to collaborate with the IPO for the sixth consecutive year and it is a privilege to showcase the vital contributions to society made by universities.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2017 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Texas System, Stanford University, Tsinghua University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Johns Hopkins University, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Harvard University and California Institute of Technology.

“University patents help to ignite a culture of growth and innovation which in turn stimulates local, regional, and global economies and generates funding for future research initiatives,” said Mark W. Lauroesch, IPO Executive Director. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents is a report which demonstrates the critical role universities play in patents, licensing and commercialization.”

IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2017 will be released for the 35th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2017 calendar year. For patents with one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected].

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions, and growing rapidly. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO
The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

 

RENOWNED RESEARCHERS, POLICYMAKERS, AND ACADEMIC LEADERS TO CONVERGE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. FOR 2018 NAI CONFERENCE

The Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 4-6

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Over 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Washington, D.C. on April 4-6 for the Seventh Annual Conference of the NAI. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Ronald M. Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies; David J. Skorton, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the City College of New York and president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will also include the NAI’s second annual Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s seventh annual conference is “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Intersection of Innovation and the Future, Intersection of Ideas and Entrepreneurship, and Intersection of Academia, Government, and Industry. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

“Our nation’s capital provides a fitting backdrop as we explore the intersections of academia, industry, and government in the innovation space,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The conference program engages with these wide-ranging facets of academic invention through timely panels and presentations, the induction of the newest class of NAI Fellows, and the Student Innovation Showcase. I look forward to three days of networking and learning with our attendees, while honoring the amazing accomplishments of our members.”

The NAI will induct the newest class of Fellows on April 5 at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“I am honored to join the NAI as the annual conference returns to Washington for another year of insightful programming,” Hirshfeld said. “The NAI has initiated an exciting dialogue on academic innovation that continues to gain momentum. I look forward to recognizing the next class of NAI Fellows and their substantial contributions in academic discovery and innovation which improve our quality of life and influence the next generation of thought leaders.”

Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs. In addition, over $137 billion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries. Among all NAI Fellows there are over 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, more than 440 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 37 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, and 29 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

The meeting will conclude with NAI’s Student Innovation Showcase. The showcase, in its second year, offers a unique platform for students to demonstrate world-changing inventions to the highest caliber of innovators. Six interdisciplinary student teams from prestigious research universities, including The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, University of South Florida, University of Southern California, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Worcester Polytechnic University have been invited to exhibit their inventions to a panel of prolific inventors.

“As both an inventor and administrator, I cannot overemphasize the importance of fostering young inventors throughout their academic trajectories,” said Helena Wisniewski, vice provost for research & graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NAI Fellow, and Student Innovation Showcase judge. “I am delighted to see the NAI continue to engage its network of prominent academic inventors to support the next generation of innovators, and I look forward to serving as a judge for the Student Innovation Showcase.”

A detailed agenda is available at https://www.academyofinventors.org/conference/docs/2018-nai-conference-preliminary-agenda.pdf. Invited papers from the conference will be published in the NAI journal Technology and Innovation. To learn more about Technology and Innovation, visit https://www.academyofinventors.org/ti/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. Learn more at www.academyofinventors.org.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2017 FELLOWS

155 academic inventors honored with esteemed distinction

TAMPA, Fla., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 155 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“Congratulations to the exceptional academic inventors who comprise the 2017 class of NAI Fellows,” said Shirley Malcom, Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It was my privilege to support the important mission of the NAI as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee. The NAI Fellows Program plays a vital role in bringing to the forefront the essential scientific and economic contributions of our nation’s inventors.”

On 5 Apr. 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference in Washington, DC. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Commissioner for Patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“Once again, I am in awe of the inventors elected as NAI Fellows. It was my honor to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and participate in this unique recognition of impactful patented contributions to science and technology,” Hirshfeld said, “I look forward to celebrating this remarkable group at the 2018 NAI Conference at the Smithsonian American Art Museum which was once known as the Temple of Invention during its years as the first dedicated home of the U.S. Patent Office. This historic national landmark serves as an extremely fitting location to once again showcase inventors and their technologies.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention—their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

The 2017 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full-page announcement in the 19 Jan. 2018 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Science and Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors.

2017 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Samuel I. Achilefu, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dereje Agonafer, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Mark G. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Hiroshi Amano, Nagoya University
  • Richard R. Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Leif Andersson, Texas A&M University and Uppsala University
  • J. Roger P. Angel, The University of Arizona
  • Diran Apelian, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Plamen B. Atanassov, The University of New Mexico
  • Craig H. Benson, University of Virginia
  • Cory J. Berkland, The University of Kansas
  • Vijayakumar Bhagavatula, Carnegie Mellon University
  • David J. Bishop, Boston University
  • Donald L. Bitzer, North Carolina State University
  • Randy D. Blakely, Florida Atlantic University
  • Helen M. Blau, Stanford University
  • Timothy M. Block, Baruch S. Blumberg Institute
  • Daniel J. Blumenthal, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Susmita Bose, Washington State University
  • Steven T. Boyce, University of Cincinnati
  • Edward S. Boyden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Anthony B. Brennan, University of Florida
  • Carrie L. Byington, Texas A&M University
  • Marvin H. Caruthers, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Dennis S. Charney, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky
  • Yet Ming Chiang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joanne Chory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mooi Choo Chuah, Lehigh University
  • David E. Clemmer, Indiana University
  • Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University
  • Stanley N. Cohen, Stanford University
  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Pieter Cullis, The University of British Columbia
  • Mari Dezawa, Tohoku University
  • William L. Ditto, North Carolina State University
  • Prabir K. Dutta, The Ohio State University
  • Jack A. Elias, Brown University
  • Zhigang Z. Fang, The University of Utah
  • Tim A. Fischell, Michigan State University and Western Michigan University
  • Paul B. Fisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Edward P. Furlani, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Guangping Gao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University
  • Bruce E. Gnade, Southern Methodist University
  • Lawrence Gold, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sheila A. Grant, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Mark A. Griswold, Case Western Reserve University
  • Horng-Jyh Harn, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital
  • Robert W. Heath, Jr., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Walter Brown Herbst, Northwestern University
  • Mark C. Hersam, Northwestern University
  • David M. Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ming Hsieh, University of Southern California
  • Ian W. Hunter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Mikko Hupa, Åbo Akademi University
  • Oliver C. Ibe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  • Eric D. Isaacs, The University of Chicago
  • Subramanian S. Iyer, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Joseph A. Izatt, Duke University
  • William R. Jacobs, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University
  • Stephen Albert Johnston, Arizona State University
  • Ranu Jung, Florida International University
  • Brian L. Justus, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
  • Alexander V. Kabanov, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aravinda Kar, University of Central Florida
  • Kazunori Kataoka, The University of Tokyo
  • Howard E. Katz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Arie E. Kaufman, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Donald B. Keck, University of South Florida
  • Jeffery W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute
  • David V. Kerns, Jr., Olin College of Engineering
  • Robert S. Keynton, University of Louisville
  • Dennis K. Killinger, University of South Florida
  • Kwang J. Kim, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Wayne H. Knox, University of Rochester
  • Philip T. Kortum, Rice University
  • Philip T. Krein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • John J. La Scala, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Jonathan J. Langberg, Emory University
  • Sang Yup Lee, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Fred C. Lee, Virginia Tech
  • Eric C. Leuthardt, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology
  • Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California, Berkeley
  • Chih-Yuan Lu, National Taiwan University
  • Zhenqiang Ma, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michele Marcolongo, Drexel University
  • Laura Marcu, University of California, Davis
  • R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University
  • Gary S. Margules, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mary Helen McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Kishor C. Mehta, Texas Tech University
  • Deirdre R. Meldrum, Arizona State University
  • Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
  • Gregory Moller, University of Idaho
  • Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., University of Maryland
  • Shouleh Nikzad, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • John R. Nottingham, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic
  • Mariappan P. Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Christopher R. Parish, The Australian National University
  • Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dennis W. Prather, University of Delaware
  • Paul R. Prucnal, Princeton University
  • Nirmala Ramanujam, Duke University
  • Jennifer L. Rexford, Princeton University
  • Kenner C. Rice, National Institutes of Health
  • Camillo Ricordi, University of Miami
  • Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Bruce R. Rosen, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Barbara O. Rothbaum, Emory University
  • Jonathan M. Rothberg, Yale University
  • Max F. Rothschild, Iowa State University
  • Clinton T. Rubin, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Henry Samueli, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine
  • Ulrich S. Schubert, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
  • Paul A. Seib, Kansas State University
  • Terrence J. Sejnowski, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mohammad Shahidehpour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Yun-Qing Shi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Subhash L. Shinde, University of Notre Dame
  • Richard W. Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Krishna P. Singh, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hyongsok T. Soh, Stanford University
  • Steven L. Stice, University of Georgia
  • Steven L. Suib, University of Connecticut
  • Russell H. Taylor, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jeffrey A. Toretsky, Georgetown University
  • Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh and The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Robert Vince, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew J. Viterbi, University of Southern California
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, Duke University
  • Scott A. Waldman, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Thomas A. Waldmann, National Cancer Institute
  • Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Fei Wang, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Scott C. Weaver, The University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Thomas J. Webster, Northeastern University
  • Chin-Long Wey, National Chiao Tung University
  • Lorne Whitehead, The University of British Columbia
  • Cheryl L. Willman, The University of New Mexico
  • Alan N. Willson, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Teresa K. Woodruff, Northwestern University
  • Amy E. Wright, Florida Atlantic University
  • Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley
  • Paul Yager, University of Washington
  • Jackie Y. Ying, Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Bin Yu, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
  • Mona E. Zaghloul, The George Washington University
  • Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University
  • Lynn Zechiedrich, Baylor College of Medicine

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. UTILITY PATENTS FOR 2016 ANNOUNCED

Top University Patent Holders Unveiled in Report by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 has been announced by The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data is obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to compile the report which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report, which has been published each year since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, collects the rankings by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report can be found at: www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes, products and treatments which provide significant societal benefit as well as generate job creation that sustains and helps grow our local, regional and global economy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “It is an honor to recognize the top patent holders through this report in collaboration with IPO for the fifth consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2016 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, California Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, The University of Texas System, University of Michigan, and Columbia University.

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NAI CONFERENCE TO BRING WORLD RENOWNED ACADEMIC INVENTORS AND ASPIRING INNOVATORS TO BOSTON

The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 5-7

BOSTON, April 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Nearly 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Boston April 5-7 for the Sixth Annual Conference. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, IBM’s most prolific female inventor, and H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The meeting also will include the NAI’s inaugural Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s sixth annual conference is “Recognizing Pillars of Academic Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Changing the Academic Innovation Landscape, Issues Relating to Public Policy and Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Drive the Future of Innovation. Presenters include academic luminaries among the NAI’s members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

The NAI will induct the newly elected Fellows on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“It is an honor to once again participate in the NAI’s Annual Conference and the induction of some of our nation’s most esteemed academic inventors,” Hirshfeld said. “It is extremely gratifying to watch the NAI grow into one of the leading organizations that promotes invention by emphasizing the role of patents. I look forward to honoring the newest class of NAI Fellows and their vital contributions to society.”

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NAI FELLOWS AMONG FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Four NAI Fellows Recognized for Innovative Contributions to State of Florida

TAMPA, Fla. – Four National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows are among the eight inventors elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the nation.

NAI Fellows elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame include:

Issa Batarseh, director of the Energy System Integration Division at the Florida Power Electronics Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Central Florida, was elected for innovative research which led to the creation of the first compact single solar photovoltaic (PV) panel.

Kenneth M. Ford, co-founder and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, was elected for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence and human-centered computing.

Richard D. Gitlin, State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida, was elected for his inventive research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems.

T. Dwayne McCay, president and CEO of the Florida Institute of Technology, is being inducted along with his wife, Mary Helen McCay, for their novel approaches to laser induced surface improvements.

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame was recognized by the Florida Senate in 2014 with a resolution sponsored by Senator Jeff Brandes that commended the Hall of Fame “for its commitment to honoring inventors and celebrating innovation, discovery, and excellence.” The Hall of Fame is located at the University of South Florida in Tampa and supported, in part, by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The newly elected Hall of Fame innovators be inducted at the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame 4th Annual Induction Ceremony & Gala on Sep. 8, 2017, at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

A complete list of Florida Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, including biographical information, is available here: www.FloridaInvents.org.

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BILL INTRODUCED TO GRANT FEDERAL CHARTER TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS

Congressman Dennis Ross Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Recognize the NAI’s Role in Advancing Academic Innovation

TAMPA, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – U.S. Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-FL-15) has introduced H.R. 976, a bill to grant federal charter to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). This bipartisan legislation would recognize the importance of the NAI’s mission of advancing a culture where academic invention and innovation is celebrated for its role in fueling our nation’s economy.

The NAI is a non-profit member organization comprised of more than 240 U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with more than 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows.

H.R. 976 would provide an honorific designation symbolizing the significance of the NAI’s mission, goals and objectives in benefiting the public. The charter would also allow NAI members to be called upon as advisors by any department of the government. NAI members are contributors to fields including medicine, cybersecurity, veteran’s research, and engineering among many others.

The NAI Fellows Program has 757 Fellows worldwide representing more than 229 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in July 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with more than $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“NAI members among our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies and translating them into innovative products, processes, cures, and treatments, for the betterment of society,” Ross said, “I am proud to introduce this important bill to help further the mission of the NAI and allow their members to serve our government as subject matter experts on innovation, intellectual property, translational research and commercialization.”

The NAI is seeking additional support for this bill which currently has two original co-sponsors including: Daniel Lipinski [IL-3] and Rep. Kathy Castor [FL-14].

“We are very grateful to Congressman Ross and the supporting co-sponsors for introducing this important charter bill which recognizes the vital role academic innovation plays in moving our nation forward,” said Paul R. Sanberg, the NAI’s founder and president and the Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation & Economic Development at the University of South Florida.

“For generations, America’s academic inventors have been at the forefront of modernizing every aspect of our lives and keeping our nation economically strong and competitive. A federal charter for the National Academy of Inventors serves the public good in supporting intellectual property, translational research and commercialization. We are honored to be considered for this recognition and to continue the NAI’s work in supporting and advancing the cause of innovation and invention.”

For more information on how to encourage your congressional delegation to support this initiative, please contact Keara Leach at 813-974-5862, [email protected].

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2016 FELLOWS

Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 94 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 376 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 28 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 45 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 28 Nobel Laureates, 216 AAAS Fellows, 126 IEEE Fellows, and 116 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in Jul. 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with over $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

On 6 Apr. 2017, the 2016 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Andrew H. Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“I look forward to welcoming and honoring the 2016 class of Fellows to Boston in April,” said Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering at Northeastern University and NAI Fellow. “The NAI has once again unveiled a prolific group of academic inventors who produce vitally important discoveries for the betterment of society.”

“With each year I continue to be amazed by the caliber of individuals named as NAI Fellows and the 2016 class is no exception,” said U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld. “Congratulations to this very deserving group of distinguished academic innovators. I was honored to once again serve as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee and look forward to recognizing this new group of innovative leaders at the induction ceremony this spring.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to innovation in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 Jan. 2017 issue, and in upcoming issues of Inventors Digest and NAI journal Technology and Innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows were evaluated by the 2016 Selection Committee included 19 members, comprising NAI Fellows, recipients of U.S. National Medals, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“It is exciting to see the NAI Fellows Program continue to grow and honor the world’s most impactful academic inventors each year,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The 2016 Fellows exude innovative excellence and we feel truly privileged to welcome them to the Academy and recognize their remarkable contributions to discovery and invention.”

2016 Elected NAI Fellows

  • David Akopian, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kamal S. Ali, Jackson State University
  • A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carl R. Alving, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Hamid Arastoopour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Arsenault, Tufts University
  • B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University
  • Zhenan Bao, Stanford University
  • Richard G. Baraniuk, Rice University
  • Francis Barany, Cornell University
  • Jean-Marie Basset, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Paula J. Bates, University of Louisville
  • Craig C. Beeson, Medical University of South Carolina
  • K. Darrell Berlin, Oklahoma State University
  • Sarit B. Bhaduri, The University of Toledo
  • Pallab K. Bhattacharya, University of Michigan
  • Dieter H. Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • Christopher N. Bowman, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Barbara D. Boyan, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Mindy M. Brashears, Texas Tech University
  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ruben G. Carbonell, North Carolina State University
  • John F. Carpenter, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Raghunath V. Chaudhari, The University of Kansas
  • Liang-Gee Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Simon R. Cherry, University of California, Davis
  • Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Adrienne E. Clarke, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Rita R. Colwell, University of Maryland
  • Diane J. Cook, Washington State University
  • Peter A. Crooks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Riccardo Dalla-Favera, Columbia University
  • Suman Datta, University of Notre Dame
  • Delbert E. Day, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roger A. de la Torre, University of Missouri
  • Stephen W. Director, Northeastern University
  • Jeffrey L. Duerk, Case Western Reserve University
  • James L. Dye, Michigan State University
  • Richard L. Ehman, Mayo Clinic
  • Gary A. Eiceman, New Mexico State University
  • Ali Emadi, McMaster University, Canada
  • Ronald M. Evans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Stanley Falkow, Stanford University
  • Hany Farid, Dartmouth College
  • Shane M. Farritor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Philippe M. Fauchet, Vanderbilt University
  • Denise L. Faustman, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • David R. Fischell, Cornell University
  • Vincent A. Fischetti, The Rockefeller University
  • David P. Fries, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Kenneth G. Furton, Florida International University
  • Kanad Ghose, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Juan E. Gilbert, University of Florida
  • Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco
  • Herbert Gleiter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Dan M. Goebel, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Forouzan Golshani, California State University, Long Beach
  • Lorne M. Golub, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • John B. Goodenough, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael Graetzel, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Robert J. Greenberg, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research
  • Richard M. Greenwald, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick G. Halbur, Iowa State University
  • Henry R. Halperin, Johns Hopkins University
  • Amy E. Herr, University of California, Berkeley
  • D. Craig Hooper, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Edward A. Hoover, Colorado State University
  • Oliver Yoa-Pu Hu, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan
  • David Huang, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Mark S. Humayun, University of Southern California
  • Joseph P. Iannotti, Cleveland Clinic
  • Enrique Iglesia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sungho Jin, University of California, San Diego
  • Barry W. Johnson, University of Virginia
  • William L. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • John L. Junkins, Texas A&M University
  • Michelle Khine, University of California, Irvine
  • John Klier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Thomas J. Kodadek, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Harold L. Kohn, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Steven M. Kuznicki, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Enrique J. Lavernia, University of California, Irvine
  • Nicholas J. Lawrence, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Leslie A. Leinwand, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Frances S. Ligler, North Carolina State University
  • Yilu Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jennifer K. Lodge, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Mandi J. Lopez, Louisiana State University
  • Gabriel P. López, The University of New Mexico
  • Surya K. Mallapragada, Iowa State University
  • Seth R. Marder, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University
  • Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation-India
  • Kouki Matsuse, Meiji University, Japan
  • Martin M. Matzuk, Baylor University
  • T. Dwayne McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • James W. McGinity, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Thomas J. Meade, Northwestern University
  • Katrina L. Mealey, Washington State University
  • Edward W. Merrill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Paul L. Modrich, Duke University
  • David J. Mooney, Harvard University
  • H. Keith Moo-Young, Washington State University Tri-Cities
  • Israel J. Morejon, University of South Florida
  • Harold L. Moses, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph R. Moskal, Northwestern University
  • Nazim Z. Muradov, University of Central Florida
  • Nicholas Muzyczka, University of Florida
  • Lakshmi S. Nair, University of Connecticut
  • Shrikanth S. Narayanan, University of Southern California
  • Ellen Ochoa, NASA Johnson Space Center
  • Erin K. O’Shea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Francis A. Papay, Cleveland Clinic
  • Kevin J. Parker, University of Rochester
  • Yvonne J. Paterson, University of Pennsylvania
  • George N. Pavlakis, National Institutes of Health
  • Kenneth H. Perlin, New York University
  • Nasser Peyghambarian, The University of Arizona
  • Gary A. Piazza, University of South Alabama
  • Christophe Pierre, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Michael C. Pirrung, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael V. Pishko, University of Wyoming
  • Garth Powis, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Paras N. Prasad, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ronald T. Raines, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Michael P. Rastatter, East Carolina University
  • Jacob Richter, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Richard E. Riman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Andrew G. Rinzler, University of Florida
  • Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University
  • Nabeel A. Riza, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Kenneth J. Rothschild, Boston University
  • Stuart H. Rubin, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center
  • Linda J. Saif, The Ohio State University
  • Sudeep Sarkar, University of South Florida
  • John T. Schiller, National Institutes of Health
  • Diane G. Schmidt, University of Cincinnati
  • Wayne S. Seames, University of North Dakota
  • Michael S. Shur, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University
  • Mrityunjay Singh, Ohio Aerospace Institute
  • Kamalesh K. Sirkar, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • David R. Smith, Duke University
  • James E. Smith, West Virginia University
  • Terrance P. Snutch, The University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University
  • Gerald Sonnenfeld, The University of Rhode Island
  • James S. Speck, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Bruce W. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman University
  • Kenneth S. Suslick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark J. Suto, Southern Research Institute
  • Yu-Chong Tai, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Tansu, Lehigh University
  • Fleur T. Tehrani, California State University, Fullerton
  • Marc T. Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford University
  • Madhukar (Mathew) L. Thakur, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Mehmet Toner, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan T. Vilcek, New York University
  • Anil V. Virkar, The University of Utah
  • John F. Wager, Oregon State University
  • William R. Wagner, University of Pittsburgh
  • Isiah M. Warner, Louisiana State University
  • John D. Weete, Auburn University
  • Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University
  • Ralph Weissleder, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas M. Weller, University of South Florida
  • Jennifer L. West, Duke University
  • Amnon Yariv, California Institute of Technology
  • Yun Yen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Warren M. Zapol, Massachusetts General Hospital

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS FOR 2015 ANNOUNCED

NAI and IPO Release Report on Top University Patent Holders for Fourth Time

TAMPA, Fla. (Jul. 12, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2015. The report utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent.

“The rate at which our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies is growing faster than ever and it is an honor to recognize these institutions for their amazing work,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We thank the IPO for collaborating with the NAI for the fourth year in a row on this ranking which confirms the importance of supporting research and innovation within academia.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, The University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan.

“IPO is proud to once again release this important report with the NAI to highlight the tremendous work in patents being done at universities,” said IPO Executive Director, Mark W. Lauroesch. “Inventive ecosystems continue to grow around universities, sparking a culture in which academics and innovation go hand-in-hand producing technologies which stimulate not only local and regional economies but the global economy.”

IPO’s 33rd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2015 was also recently released. The top 10 universities on the 2015 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2015 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS SIGN MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH US PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

NAI and USPTO officials signed agreement during NAI’s Fifth Annual Conference

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (April 26, 2016) – Russell Slifer, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and deputy director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), signed a Memorandum of Agreement during the NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, the closing event for the NAI’s fifth annual conference on April 15, 2016.

The agreement outlines the opportunity for the USPTO and the NAI to work closely on mutually beneficial projects to enrich education outreach, honors and awards, and programs relating to intellectual property. The agreement includes a commitment from the NAI to host its annual meeting every other year at USPTO headquarters.

“It has been our pleasure at the USPTO, for the last five years to have a relationship with the Academy and it is my pleasure also to sign our Memorandum of Agreement,” said Slifer. “We will continue to cooperate to host events and awards. The NAI annual meeting will continue to be held here every other year, which will allow for our employees to meet with NAI members and Fellows to discuss how the work they are doing comes together to help the nation and innovators around the world.”

David Kappos, former Under Secretary of Commerce and previous director of the USPTO, embraced the NAI soon after it was founded in 2010 and suggested the need for a higher level program for leading academic inventors to be honored and recognized for their contributions to society.

In his speech at the 2012 NAI annual meeting in Tampa, Kappos said, “The NAI is a breakthrough for our country. It couldn’t be more timely to have an organization like this to be championing innovation.”

“We are very grateful that the USPTO has provided vital support to the NAI since our inception,” said Sanberg. “We are pleased to announce the signing of this Memorandum of Agreement which solidifies our important friendship and we look forward to a bright future of collaborations.”

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FELLOWS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS INDUCTED AT UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

2015 keynote speech provided by U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) – U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld provided the keynote address for the induction ceremony of the 2015 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors at the NAI’s fifth annual conference, held this year in Washington D.C. on Apr. 14-15.

Over 325 inventors and academic leaders attended the conference, which featured presentations and panels by more than 30 distinguished scientists and innovators including keynote addresses by Victor J. Dzau, President of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow; Cristin A. Dorgelo, Chief of Staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; and Emery N. Brown, MIT Professor and NAI Fellow.

“It was an honor to participate in the NAI’s fifth annual meeting as a featured speaker,” said Brown. “The NAI fills a vital need by bringing together innovators from across disciplines to be recognized for their groundbreaking contributions in research, patents and commercialization. I am honored to be a Fellow of this important national organization.”

At the ceremony held on Apr. 15 at the USPTO, Hirshfeld and Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI and Charter Fellow, presented the 2015 class of Fellows with a trophy, medal and rosette pin honoring their contributions as academic inventors. Of the 168 innovators elected to the 2015 class, more than 130 were in attendance.

“I am personally inspired and grateful to be amongst this distinguished group and join in recognizing you today,” said Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, during his keynote address. “You have truly enhanced the quality of life for our nation and we thank you for your innovative contributions. As inventive researchers who are leaders in all fields of academia, we are eager to learn from your expertise and collaborate on future educational initiatives.”

The NAI Fellows Program has 582 Fellows worldwide representing more than 190 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 20,000 issued U.S. patents.

The collective NAI Fellows now include more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the three branches of the National Academy of Sciences, 27 Nobel Laureates, 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 36 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 14 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows among other awards and distinctions.

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors,” said Illinois Institute of Technology President Alan W. Cramb. “Being named in the same category as other globally distinguished innovators and inventors in the NAI is a privilege.”

Nominations for 2016 Fellows will open Jul. 1 and can be submitted online through Oct. 1 at AcademyofInventors.org. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted and honored at the 2017 NAI Annual Conference, to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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U.S. COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE PRESIDENT SPEAK AT NAI CONFERENCE

The 5th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 14-15 in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 11, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors will celebrate its fifth annual conference by returning to Washington, D.C., Apr. 14-15, 2016. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents and Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow.

The theme of the NAI’s fifth conference is “Building on Foundations of Innovation” to explore the interaction between the United States’ history of change and the modern culture and leadership of innovation.

Keynote speeches by Cristin Dorgelo, chief of staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Emery Brown, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NAI Fellow, along with presentations and panels on innovation by more than 35 prolific scientists and academic leaders, round out the conference program.

Highlights also include a signature gala at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the induction of the 2015 Fellows of the NAI—the conference’s closing event—at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, with a keynote address by Hirshfeld.

“It is a pleasure to commemorate the Academy’s milestone fifth annual meeting by welcoming the NAI back to Washington,” said Hirshfeld. “I look forward to recognizing the new distinguished class of NAI Fellows. These true champions of academic invention have made tremendous contributions to society through their amazing innovations.”

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2015 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators honored with prestigious distinction

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 leaders of invention and innovation to Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing over 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2015 Fellows account for 5,368 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, NAM), 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 32 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 27 Nobel Laureates, 14 Lemelson-MIT Prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on 15 Apr. 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

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2015 Elected NAI Fellows

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dean P. Alderucci, The University of Chicago
  • Jayakrishna Ambati, University of Kentucky
  • Iver E. Anderson, Iowa State University
  • Kristi S. Anseth, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Allen W. Apblett, Oklahoma State University
  • Charles J. Arntzen, Arizona State University
  • Harry A. Atwater, Jr., California Inst. of Technology
  • Lorne A. Babiuk, University of Alberta
  • John M. Ballato, Clemson University
  • John S. Baras, University of Maryland
  • Issa Batarseh, University of Central Florida
  • Ray H. Baughman, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Angela M. Belcher, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Stephen J. Benkovic, The Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Shekhar Bhansali, Florida International University
  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • John D. Birdwell, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Kenneth J. Blank, Rowan University
  • Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University
  • John E. Bowers, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gary L. Bowlin, University of Memphis
  • C. Jeffrey Brinker, The University of New Mexico
  • Richard B. Brown, The University of Utah
  • Emery N. Brown, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Milton L. Brown, Georgetown University
  • Steven R.J. Brueck, The University of New Mexico
  • Joe C. Campbell, University of Virginia
  • Selim A. Chacour, University of South Florida
  • Mau-Chung Frank Chang, Nat. Chiao Tung Univ.
  • Shu Chien, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Diana S. Chow, University of Houston
  • Chung K. (David) Chu, University of Georgia
  • Yoginder P. Chugh, Southern Illinois University
  • William J. Clancey, IHMC
  • Katrina Cornish, The Ohio State University
  • Delos M. (Toby) Cosgrove III, Cleveland Clinic
  • Alan W. Cramb, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Benjamin F. Cravatt III, The Scripps Research Inst.
  • Roy Curtiss III, University of Florida
  • Paul D. Dapkus, University of Southern California
  • John G. Daugman, University of Cambridge
  • Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology
  • Robert C. Dean, Jr., Dartmouth College
  • Atam P. Dhawan, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Duane B. Dimos, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • David M. Eddy, University of South Florida
  • Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania
  • Antonio Facchetti, Northwestern University
  • Rudolf Faust, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland
  • Christodoulos A. Floudas, Texas A&M University
  • Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri
  • Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
  • Jean M.J. Fréchet, KAUST
  • Richard H. Frenkiel, Rutgers University
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Stanford University
  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, University of Missouri
  • Sir Andre K. Geim, The University of Manchester
  • George Georgiou, The University of Texas at Austin
  • John C. Gore, Vanderbilt University
  • Venu Govindaraju, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ali Hajimiri, California Inst. of Technology
  • Naomi J. Halas, Rice University
  • Andrew D. Hamilton, University of Oxford
  • Wayne W. Hanna, University of Georgia
  • Florence P. Haseltine, National Institutes of Health
  • Charlotte A.E. Hauser, KAUST
  • Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • M. Frederick Hawthorne, University of Missouri
  • Barton F. Haynes, Duke University
  • Richard F. Heck, University of Delaware
  • Andrew B. Holmes, The University of Melbourne
  • Rush D. Holt, AAAS
  • H. Robert Horvitz, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Chenming C. Hu, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Leon D. Iasemidis, Louisiana Tech University
  • Mir Imran, University of Pittsburgh
  • Donald E. Ingber, Harvard University
  • Chennupati Jagadish, The Australian National Univ.
  • Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University
  • Kristina M. Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Joseph S. Kalinowski, East Carolina University
  • Aaron V. Kaplan, Dartmouth College
  • Usha N. Kasid, Georgetown University
  • Kenneth W. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University
  • Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University
  • Steven J. Kubisen, The George Washington Univ.
  • Donald W. Landry, Columbia University
  • Se-Jin Lee, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sunggyu Lee, Ohio University
  • Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke University
  • G. Douglas Letson, Moffitt Cancer & Research Inst.
  • Jennifer A. Lewis, Harvard University
  • Guifang Li, University of Central Florida
  • James C. Liao, Univ. of California, Los Angeles
  • John S. (Pete) Lollar III, Emory University
  • Anthony M. Lowman, Rowan University
  • Rodney S. Markin, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University
  • Dean F. Martin, University of South Florida
  • Helen S. Mayberg, Emory University
  • Patrick L. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Edith G. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center
  • Thomas E. Milner, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Umesh K. Mishra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Somenath Mitra, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Andreas F. Molisch, University of Southern California
  • Ramani Narayan, Michigan State University
  • Alan C. Nelson, Arizona State University
  • Kyriacos C. Nicolaou, Rice University
  • David R. Nygren, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • Richard M. Osgood, Jr., Columbia University
  • Alyssa Panitch, Purdue University
  • Heloise A. Pereira, OUHSC
  • William M. Pierce, Jr., University of Louisville
  • John M. Poate, Colorado School of Mines
  • H. Vincent, Poor, Princeton University
  • Ann Progulske-Fox, University of Florida
  • Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington
  • Kaushik Rajashekara, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas
  • Jahangir S. Rastegar, Stony Brook University
  • A. Hari Reddi, Univ. of California, Davis
  • E. Albert Reece, University of Maryland
  • Kenneth L. Reifsnider, The Univ. of TX at Arlington
  • Jasper D. Rine, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Ajeet Rohatgi, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Stephen D. Russell, SPAWAR
  • Michael J. Sailor, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Bahgat G. Sammakia, Binghamton University
  • Andrew V. Schally, University of Miami
  • Paul R. Schimmel, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Peter G. Schultz, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University
  • Jonathan L. Sessler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Mohsen Shahinpour, University of Maine
  • Benjamin A. Shneiderman, University of Maryland
  • Marvin J. Slepian, The University of Arizona
  • Kwok-Fai So, The University of Hong Kong
  • Richard A. Soref, Univ. of Massachusetts Boston
  • Pramod K. Srivastava, University of Connecticut
  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati
  • Valentino J. Stella, The University of Kansas
  • Galen D. Stucky, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bala Subramaniam, The University of Kansas
  • R. Michael Tanner, APLU
  • Guillermo J. Tearney, Harvard University
  • Stephen Tomlinson, Medical Univ. of South Carolina
  • James M. Tour, Rice University
  • Kalliat T. Valsaraj, Louisiana State University
  • Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Purdue University
  • Norman J. Wagner III, University of Delaware
  • Yong Wang, Washington State University
  • James A. Wells, Univ. of California, San Francisco
  • Jay F. Whitacre, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caroline C. Whitacre, The Ohio State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, Univ. of Alaska Anchorage
  • Edward D. Wolf, Cornell University
  • Paul K. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • James C. Wyant, The University of Arizona
  • Pan-Chyr Yang, National Taiwan University
  • Yu-Dong Yao, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Martin L. Yarmush, Rutgers University
  • Jim P. Zheng, Florida State University

NAI AND IPO RELEASE TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (June 16, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

“The NAI is delighted to be releasing this list of the leading innovative universities in the world in conjunction with the IPO for the third year in a row,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “The data once again proves that innovation based on university technology continues to be a key factor in economic development and a fundamental element to the success of a university.”

In conjunction, the IPO will soon be releasing their 32nd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations worldwide that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2014. The top 13 universities on the 2014 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2014 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

“Patents make enormous contributions to U.S innovation, leading to more jobs in U.S. industry and new strength in the economy,” said IPO Executive Director Herbert C. Wamsley. “These innovations help solidify the transfer of cutting-edge research to the marketplace, producing revenue and potentially increasing research funding by providing corporations and businesses the incentive to invest in university projects.”

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2014 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research, or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected]

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2014 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators elected to high honor

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 16, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 170 distinguished innovators to NAI Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 414, representing more than 150 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions.

Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leadership of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 208 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, IOM), 21 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 16 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, 10 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Science, 21 Nobel Laureates, 11 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 112 AAAS Fellows, and 62 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Collectively, the 414 NAI Fellows hold nearly 14,000 U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on Mar. 20, 2015, as part of the 4th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Deputy Commissioner for Patent Operations Andrew Faile will be providing the keynote address for the induction ceremony. Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, newly designed medal, and rosette pin in honor of their outstanding accomplishments.

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NAI MEMBER INSTITUTIONS DOMINATE NSF I-CORPS TEAM AWARDS

Eight of the top 12 universities nationally are NAI members

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 25, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors today recognized NAI Member Institutions with teams selected in 2014 for the Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Team program by the National Science Foundation. The 82 teams from NAI member universities comprise 54 percent of all teams nationwide receiving I-Corps Team awards this year.

Among the top 12 universities receiving the awards, eight are from NAI member universities, including, at #1, University of Michigan with 13 teams; #3, University of South Florida with five teams; #4, Carnegie-Mellon University with four teams; and tied for #5 with three teams each, Arizona State University, Florida State University, Lehigh University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nationally, 153 teams from 91 universities were selected for I-Corps Team awards in 2014. Each team receives a $50,000 grant and participates in an I-Corps Teams curriculum designed to provide hands-on, immersive learning for researchers on what it takes to successfully transition research out of the laboratory into commercially feasible products that benefit society.

“We are proud our Member Institutions are leading the way in this groundbreaking program.” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors and a AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador. “Their work contributes to economic prosperity in their communities, states and our nation.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) established the I-Corps Teams program to identify NSF-funded researchers, and provide them mentoring and funding in order to accelerate the translation of knowledge derived from fundamental research into emerging products and services.

“This is a powerful economic development initiative by the NSF,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development at Arizona State University, one of the top 12 universities receiving awards this year. “The I-Corps Team program is designed to create a national innovation ecology and will have a high impact.”

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NAI member institutions receiving NSI I-Corps Team Awards in 2014

Arizona State University

Auburn University

Boise State University

Carnegie-Mellon University

Colorado State University

Columbia University

Cornell University

Drexel University

Florida International University

Florida State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana Tech University

Missouri University of Science and Technology

New Mexico State University

New York University

Ohio State University

Oklahoma State University

Purdue University

Rutgers University New Brunswick

Stevens Institute of Technology

SUNY at Buffalo

SUNY at Stony Brook

Temple University

Texas Tech University

University of Akron

University of Arizona

University of California-Berkeley

University of California-Davis

University of Cincinnati Main Campus

University of Florida

University of Georgia Research Foundation Inc

University of Houston

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky Research Foundation

University of Maryland College Park

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Michigan Ann Arbor

University of North Texas

University of South Carolina at Columbia

University of South Florida

University of Toledo

University of Wisconsin-Madison

WHY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BRINGS UNIVERSITIES
‘MORE THAN MONEY’

Many benefits of tech transfer to universities beyond revenues from licenses & royalties

TAMPA, Fla. (June 26, 2014) – Academic technology transfer – the process of moving research from the lab to the market – provides intrinsic benefits to universities that go far beyond any potential revenues from licenses and royalties.

So say the authors, from five universities across the country and the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), in a new article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) that appears in the current issue of Technology and Innovation and is available Open Access.

“More than Money: The Exponential Impact of Academic Technology Transfer” is the work of lead author Valerie Landrio McDevitt, former associate vice president at the University of South Florida (USF) and current executive director of AUTM, and co-authors, Joelle Mendez-Hinds of USF, David Winwood of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Vinit Nijhawan of Boston University (BU), Todd Sherer of Emory University, John F. Ritter of Princeton University, and Paul R. Sanberg of USF and the NAI. USF, UAB, BU and Emory are all Charter Member Institutions of the NAI.

According to the authors, the positive benefits of technology transfer for universities can be significant, including: a vibrant culture of entrepreneurship that promotes recruitment and retention of faculty, increased student success through participation in real world research, public benefits from applied research that seeks to address global challenges, economic development, increased opportunities for funding through inter-institutional and interdisciplinary grants, new start-ups and international research relationships, and increased prestige and fundraising from a stronger university brand.

“In the academic setting, technology transfer is a critical component for facilitating and sparking innovation within universities and helping to connect universities with commercial partners in the community,” says co-author Paul R. Sanberg, who is founder and president of the NAI. “Technology transfer can be truly transformational to a university and to the community.”

The authors:

Valerie Landrio McDevitt, a registered patent attorney, is executive director of the Association of University Technology Manager (AUTM). She received her J.D. at Emory University School of Law. Prior to joining AUTM, she served as the associate vice president for technology transfer and business incubation at the University of South Florida. She previously worked as a science advisor with a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., and participated in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellowship program.

Joelle Mendez-Hinds is a patent marketing intern in the Technology Transfer Office/Division of Patents & Licensing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

David Winwood is chief executive officer of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Foundation and senior associate vice president for Economic Development and Innovation Alliances. Prior to joining UAB, Winwood served North Carolina State University and The Ohio State University. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness Regional Innovation Initiative Expert Committee and serves on boards of directors for the Council on Governmental Relations, Biotechnology Association of Alabama, Birmingham Venture Club, Innovation Depot, and TechBirmingham.

Vinit Nijhawan, is managing director of the Office of Technology Development and director of Enterprise Programs at the Institute of Technology at Boston University, Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at BU. He received his B.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. He has more than twenty-five years of experience building five startups and was CEO of three of them. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of TiE Global, a non-profit that fosters entrepreneurship globally; special assistant to the vice president of research; and director of the Kindle Mentoring Program at BU.

Todd Sherer, is associate vice president for research administration and executive director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in toxicology at Washington State University. Prior to joining Emory, he was director of the Office of Technology and Research Collaborations at Oregon Health & Science University. He served as president of AUTM and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

John F. Ritter, is director of the Office of Technology Licensing at Princeton University. Prior to joining Princeton, he served as a senior licensing professional at Rutgers University. He is secretary of the Review Panel on Conflict of Interest in Research. He received his J.D. from Rutgers School of Law and his M.B.A from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Paul R. Sanberg, is senior vice president for research and innovation and Distinguished University Professor at the University of South Florida, and founder and president of the National Academy of Inventors. He is an inventor on over 30 licensed health-related U.S. patents and a highly cited author with more than 600 publications. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, NAI, Royal Societies (Medicine, Chemistry and Public Health), AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador, and serves on the evaluation committee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2019 Fellows

The National Academy of Inventors has elected 168 academic inventors to the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 3, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 prolific academic innovators from across the world to NAI Fellow status.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

“Congratulations to the 2019 class of NAI Fellows,” said Laura A. Peter, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “It is a privilege to welcome these exceptionally-qualified individuals to this prestigious organization. I am certain their accomplishments will inspire the next generation of invention pioneers.”

Peter will be the keynote speaker at the 2020 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, April 10, 2020, in Phoenix, Arizona, a commemorative event at the Ninth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors. At the ceremony, Fellows will be formally inducted by Peter and NAI President Paul R. Sanberg in recognition of their outstanding achievements. “I am so impressed by the caliber of this year’s class of NAI Fellows, all of whom are highly-regarded in their respective fields,” said Sanberg. “The breadth and scope of their discovery is truly staggering. I’m excited not only see their work continue, but also to see their knowledge influence a new era of science, technology, and innovation worldwide.” The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

Ernesto V. Abel-Santos, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
David A. Ahlquist, Mayo Clinic
Susan D. Allen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
Andrea Alù , City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center,
Photonics Initiative
Guillermo A. Ameer, Northwestern University
Subramaniam Ananthan, Southern Research Institute
Gattadahalli M. Anantharamaiah, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology
Rodolphe Barrango, North Carolina State University
Rena Bizio, The University of Texas at San Antonio
Michael Blaber, Florida State University
Anne J. Blaschke-Bonkowsky, The University of Utah
Stephen A. Boppart, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Robert Bowser, Barrow Neurological Institute
Michael S. Brown, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Ardeshir (Adi) Ratan Bulsara, Naval Information Warfare Center
Jason Burdick, University of Pennsylvania
Lewis C. Cantley, Cornell University
Michael L. Chabinyc, University of California, Santa Barbara
Bryce Chackerian, The University of New Mexico
Paul Citron, University of California, San Diego
John P. Cooke, Houston Methodist Research Institute
Jerome Cox, Washington University in St. Louis
Seamus Curran, University of Houston
Pamela B. Davis, Case Western Reserve University
Cristina E. Davis, University of California, Davis
Peter B. Dervan, California Institute of Technology
Tejal A. Desai, University of California, San Francisco
Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
Jon P. Dobson, University of Florida
Francis Joseph Doyle, III, Harvard University
Dongsheng Duan, University of Missouri-Columbia
Dean B. Edwards, University of Idaho
Ayman Sabry El-Baz, University of Louisville
John F. Engelhardt, University of Iowa
Laura Ensign, Johns Hopkins University
William J. Federspiel, University of Pittsburgh
Terri Fiez, University of Colorado Boulder
Francis Stuart Foster, University of Toronto
Kaizhong Gao, Argonne National Laboratory
Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, Mount Sinai Health System
Glenn R. Gaudette, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Robert J. Genco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
Georgios B. Giannakis, University of Minnesota
John Murray Gibson, Florida A&M University
Joseph L. Goldstein, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Kenneth E. Goodson, Stanford University
Renukaradhya J. Gourapura, The Ohio State University
David Grewell, North Dakota State University
David Grier, New York University
Robert E. Guldberg, University of Oregon
Bernard Franklin Gupton, Virginia Commonwealth University
Horst Hahn, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/University of California, Irvine
Yousef Haik, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
Robert P. Hammer, Louisiana State University
Luis Rafael Herrera-Estrella, Texas Tech University/Centro de
Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados

  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

 

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology and Innovation’s latest issue explores innovative technologies and methodologies, including the intersection of dance and assistive technology, blockchain platform payments, and customer-centric practices applied to academia.

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 20, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation® (21:1) features a selection of papers highlighting innovations in fields as varied as medicine, finance, and pedagogy. Taking the broad view of mindsets and skillsets powering progress for the future, authors delve into the rich rewards to be found in using the intersection of dance and assistive technology to ignite creative advancements in both areas, recommendations for moving the needle on women’s participation in patent-rich disciplines and jobs, and the application of customer-centric practices from management disciplines to academia, among others

Of particular interest is Dr. Nasser Arshadi’s “Blockchain Platform for Real-Time Payments: A Less Costly and More Secure Alternative to ACH.” Given the increasing focus on blockchain, this paper offers a timely survey of the history and a cogent evaluation of the promise of this platform. After a discussion of the development of banking and automated clearing house (ACH) legacy systems, Arshadi examines the blockchain platform for real-time payments as an alternative. When compared to our current use of ACH in the U.S., Arshadi calculates that the use of real-time blockchain protocol equals billions of dollars of saving for businesses and customers.

“This publication represents an opportunity to share best practices across a number of critical platforms,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, leader of the knowledge enterprise development at Arizona State University and vice president for strategic initiatives membership for the National Academy of Inventors. “It also provides insight into niche areas of emerging technology that are important in our various capacities as researchers, scientists, inventors, and educators.”

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic Innovation

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.
 

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Lee, University of California, Irvine
  • Anna M. Leese de Escobar, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Warren J. Leonard, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
  • Johannes A. Lercher, Technical University of Munich
  • Teik C. Lim, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Craig W. Lindsley, Vanderbilt University/Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery
  • Elizabeth G. Loboa, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Ted L. Maddess, Australian National University
  • Elizabeth M. McNally, Northwestern University
  • Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ellis Meng, University of Southern California
  • Joachim Messing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Lalit K. Mestha, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Lyle R. Middendorf, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Shaker A. Mousa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
  • William P. Murphy, Jr., Florida International University
  • William L. Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Prakash Nagarkatti, University of South Carolina
  • Nathan Newman, Arizona State University
  • Bert W. O’Malley, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Aydogan Ozcan, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia University
  • Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University
  • Roderic I. Pettigrew, Texas A&M University
  • Apparao M. Rao, Clemson Nanomaterials Institute/Clemson University
  • Theodore S. Rappaport, New York University
  • Rafael Reif, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joshua Rokach, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Yoram Rudy, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wheeler Ruml, University of New Hampshire
  • Thomas P. Russell, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jagannathan Sarangapani, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Vinod Sarin, Boston University
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College
  • Steven J. Sasson, University of South Florida
  • Christine E. Schmidt, University of Florida
  • Zheng John Shen, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Thomas E. Shenk, Princeton University
  • Mark B. Shiflett, University of Kansas
  • Michael L. Simpson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory/The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Koji Sode, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Costas M. Soukoulis, Iowa State University/Ames Laboratory
  • John W. Spirk, Cleveland Clinic
  • Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • William Studier, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University
  • Koduvayur P. Subbalakshmi, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Bruce A. Sullenger, Duke University
  • Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University
  • Jing Sun, University of Michigan
  • Yu Sun, University of Toronto
  • Wanchun Tang, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego
  • Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • David A. Tirrell, California Institute of Technology
  • Don M. Tucker, University of Oregon
  • Jeffrey S. Vitter, The University of Mississippi
  • Israel E. Wachs, Lehigh University
  • Albert Wang, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael S. Waterman, University of Southern California
  • Alan W. Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Louis M. Weiner, Georgetown University
  • Robert G. Wilhelm, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Yushan Yan, University of Delaware
  • Jian Yang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eui-Hyeok Yang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Mark H. Yim, The University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael J. Yost, Medical University of South Carolina
  • James M. Zavislan, University of Rochester
  • Ruiwen Zhang, University of Houston
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine

Beyond Accessibility

Technology & Innovation’s latest issue, “Technologies for Disabilities,” focuses on new solutions and new paradigms for assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2018) Technology & Innovation (T&I), journal of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), has released a new special topic issue titled “Technologies for Disabilities.” The issue delves into revolutionary devices, cutting-edge materials and processes, and new theories on designing for users with disabilities.

In every sector of modern society, technological advancements have transformed the way the world works, travels, communicates, and learns. However, not all have been equal beneficiaries of these innovations.

One billion people – the 15 percent of the world’s population who have some form of disability – have largely been left behind by technologies designed for and targeted towards people without disabilities. The new issue of T&I, (20:1-2) (full text) focuses on researchers who are attempting to correct this disparity by creating revolutionary new devices and radically changing how we design assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

“Enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities has been the goal of much of my research, and it is the goal of this special issue as well,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, vice president of the NAI and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “By designing technology where accessibility is the goal rather than an afterthought, we are setting the stage for better and more inclusive technological solutions.”

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

Two Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors Win Nobel Prizes

James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2018) – James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Allison was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, sharing the honor with Dr. Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Allison and Honjo received the prize “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.”

“I was trying to understand how T cells worked,” Allison told Adam Smith, an interviewer for TheNobelPrize.org. “I figured out this one thing about this negative regulator, and I had this idea that if we just took that off, maybe it would do a better job of killing cancer cells. Turns out it works.”

Allison was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2017. He also received the Wolf Prize in Medicine in 2017, and he received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in 2015.

Arnold received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the directed evolution of enzymes.” She conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes in 1993.

“I was able to look at the problem with a totally fresh set of eyes – a problem that had challenged people since the techniques were available,” Arnold said in a phone interview, moments after receiving the award. “I realized that the way that most people were going about protein engineering was doomed to failure.”

Arnold has since refined the methods that are now routinely used to develop new catalysts. She was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2014. She was also inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014, and she received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2011.

“We are thrilled to congratulate Allison and Arnold on these momentous achievements,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

National Academy of Inventors Releases 2018 Activities Report

The National Academy of Inventors has released its annual Activities Report, which catalogs each of the organization’s programs, membership categories, publications and yearly events.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 2, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) published its annual Activities Report today, which highlights the organization’s major events, programs and members.

The 2018 Activities Report features two new programs: the Senior Member program and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). The Senior Member program welcomes inventors early in their careers who aspire to make an impact on the academic community. GAIN is a mentoring platform exclusively available to NAI members.

“The annual Activities Report is our chance to feature our members and the incredible work they do,” said Spencer Montgomery, NAI Director. “The report spotlights inventors at each of our Sustaining Member Institutions, reviews the 2018 Annual Meeting and explains our newest programs.”

The 2018 Activities Report includes statistics on the impact NAI Fellows make on their communities, including how many companies they have formed, how many jobs they have created and more. The report highlights the NAI’s 2018 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, D.C. last April, which brought together over 450 members of the organization.

The publication provides updates and details on each of the NAI’s programs, including the Fellows program, Senior Member program, GAIN platform, NAI Chapter program and the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It concludes with a list of each member of the 2017 class of Fellows, who were inducted at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

The 2018 Activities Report is available online. Physical copies are available upon request.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches New Membership

The National Academy of Inventors’ Senior Member program honors early-stage inventors and innovators who aspire to make a real impact on society through the patenting and commercialization processes.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 1, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has launched a new membership category, the Senior Member program. The program will recognize and honor early-stage academic inventors who aspire to make a real impact on society through invention and innovation. 

The NAI Senior Member program seeks active researchers and professionals who demonstrate success in patenting, licensing and commercialization activities, and foster a spirit of innovation through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

“The Senior Member program is an exciting addition to our existing membership,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “Inventors who seek to influence and support the academic invention ecosystem have the opportunity to join the NAI’s global network of innovators striving toward a common goal.”

Elected NAI Senior Members will have access to the NAI’s premier mentorship platform, the Global Academic Inventor Network, exclusively available to NAI members. They will also have opportunities for networking and education through NAI-led panels, meetings, and committees, including the opportunity to publish in NAI’s Technology & Innovation journal.

“This program has been carefully constructed to welcome and honor a new cadre of academic inventors into our community,” said Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. “We look forward to recognizing young innovators and academically-minded individuals in the early stages of their innovation careers who aspire to reach new heights within the invention community.”

Nominations for the NAI Senior Member program opened today, and the organization will continue to accept nomination submissions on a rolling basis. Notices of election will be announced quarterly, with the inaugural class election slated for February 2019.

Eligible individuals should hold at minimum one issued U.S. patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office which has been licensed or commercialized. As an alternative, candidates may demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding five or more U.S. patents. All nominees must be affiliated with a Member Institution of the NAI.

For more information, visit the NAI website or contact Jacquie Burckley, Senior Member Coordinator, at [email protected].

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

United States Senate Resolution Recognizes the National Academy of Inventors

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 27, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has been officially recognized by the United States Senate through Senate Resolution 620, introduced as a bipartisan measure by Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri and affirmed unanimously by the full Senate on Aug. 28, 2018. 

The resolution recognizes the NAI and honors the organization’s milestone of achieving 200 member institutions.

In addition to acknowledging the NAI’s “rapid expansion,” the resolution affirms that the Senate “supports the mission of the National Academy of Inventors [and]…acknowledges the National Academy of Inventors for its role in elevating the contributions of academic inventors across all disciplines.”

“It is an honor to be recognized by the U.S. Senate for the NAI’s success in encouraging academic innovation in the United States and internationally,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “We greatly appreciate and thank Senators Nelson and Blunt for sponsoring this resolution and ensuring its swift passage.”

The NAI was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI partners closely with the USPTO in the pursuit of this mission.

“Through the doors of the USPTO walk inventors and entrepreneurs with innovations that will spur investment, create new jobs, grow our economy, and help us achieve our highest ideals,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. “Many of these will come from the National Academy of Inventors.”

The NAI now boasts more than 4,000 individual members and fellows spanning over 250 universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes.

“We are proud of the measurable impact that the NAI and our member institutions and individual inventor members and fellows are making throughout the world,” said Sanberg.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation.www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Three NAI Fellows Inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 11, 2018) – Dr. Emery Brown, Dr. Richard Houghten and Dr. Sudipta Seal, all Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame on September 7, 2018. Seven innovators were inducted during the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

Brown, Houghten and Seal join a number of NAI Fellows who have previously received this recognition, including NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg.

“It is a momentous feeling to see that nearly half of this year’s inductees to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame are NAI Fellows,” Sanberg said. “Dr. Brown, Dr. Houghten and Dr. Seal have made an incredible impact on the innovation landscape in Florida, and we are proud to support them as they receive this well-deserved honor.”

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates those inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the United States.

“It has been wonderful to see Florida embrace and elevate its own proud history of invention through the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. “Through this organization, Florida has rightly claimed its mantel as a leader in national innovation.”

Brown is Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of anesthesiology. He holds three issued U.S. patents.

Houghten founded the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and currently serves as CEO. His research has had significant impact on the pharmaceutical industry, and his innovative approach has revolutionized drug discovery across the nation. He holds 81 issued U.S. patents.

Seal is Trustee Chair, Pegasus and University Distinguished Professor at the University of Central Florida. His expertise in materials science and engineering led to groundbreaking discoveries and therapeutic applications of nano cerium oxide in regenerative nano-medicine. He holds 48 issued U.S. patents and his technology is licensed to multiple companies.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches Global Academic Inventor Network

The National Academy of Inventors aims to connect seasoned and world-renowned academic inventors with students and other junior professionals to aid them in advancing their innovative careers. 

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 5, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) today announced the launch of the Global Academic Inventors Network (GAIN). GAIN is an international mentoring platform exclusively available to academic inventors.

NAI President Paul R. Sanberg first announced the concept of a global network at the NAI’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April 2018.

“It is our hope that this network helps ease the process for emerging inventors as they take an initial idea through the entire discovery process and, then, licensing and commercializing that technology for the benefit of society,” Sanberg said.

GAIN is one of a number of initiatives that the NAI has announced in 2018. The platform is engineered to make it easy for inventive students and faculty to connect, while giving them the tools, automation and security to bring the global invention community together and drive innovation.

“The Global Academic Inventors Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration,” said Dr. Karen J.L. Burg, member of the NAI Board of Directors. “By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasoned inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

For a limited time, NAI Sustaining Member Institutions, Chapters and Fellows will receive exclusive priority access to join GAIN. Following the initial launch stage, the NAI will open the platform to the entire NAI community.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

The Invention Gender Gap

Special topic issue explores the gender gap between men and women in inventorship, analyzing its causes, evaluating current efforts to address it, and suggesting new ideas to eliminate this disparity 

Tampa, Fla. (Jul. 16, 2018) – Statistics show that women are named as inventors on less than one in five U.S. patents. Why does this gender disparity exist, and what is being done to address it? The new issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19:4) (full text) tackles these key questions, and the papers collected here serve as a primer on the state of the invention gender gap, why it persists, and what can be done to change it.

“There is perhaps no area more crucial to explore than the gender gap in invention,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and co-editor-in-chief of T&I. “The persistence of this problem cuts us off from leveraging the full innovative potential of half of our population, thus reducing our innovative output and making us less competitive as a nation. In addition to the many articles on the gender gap, we are also taking this opportunity to honor our women NAI Fellows, as are the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Science and Technology Medals Foundation with their respective women Inductees and Laureates.”

The full issue highlights can be found at the following link: https://academyofinventors.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue-Highlights-Aesthetic-Final.pdf

 

ARTICLES INCLUDED:

  • Feminist Challenge to Gene Patents
  • Gender Data Gap: Baseline of U.S. Academic Institutions
  • Engaging Women Innovators: Analytical Support For Women Innovator Programming in University Technology Transfer
  • Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Invention and Technology Commercialization
  • On the Commercialization Path: Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Outputs among Women in STEM
  • Closing Diversity Gaps in Innovation: Gender, Race, and Income Disparities in Patenting and Commercialization of Inventions
  • Addressing the Gender Gap among Patent Holders through Invention Education Policies
  • Breaking Barriers: Female Inventors Blazing a Path Forward
  • From the USPTO: Mind the Gap—The USPTO’s Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Patenting and Innovation
  • The NAI Fellow Profile: An Interview with Dr. Michelle Khine
  • Investing in Academic Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Moving Beyond Research Funding through the NSF I-CORPS® Program
  • On the Software Patenting Controversy
  • NAI Chapter Spotlight: University of Southern California
  • Innovation in Action: Arizona State University

 

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 Announced

Top University Patent Holders Revealed in Report Authored by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla. (June 5, 2018) – The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is used to compile the report, which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

Published annually since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, the report ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO during the 2017 calendar year. The full report can be found at: https://www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/top-100-universities-2017.pdf

“The institutions on this list are doing incredible work promoting academic innovation and incubating groundbreaking technologies which exemplify the importance of technology transfer to institutional success,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are proud to collaborate with the IPO for the sixth consecutive year and it is a privilege to showcase the vital contributions to society made by universities.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2017 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Texas System, Stanford University, Tsinghua University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Johns Hopkins University, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Harvard University and California Institute of Technology.

“University patents help to ignite a culture of growth and innovation which in turn stimulates local, regional, and global economies and generates funding for future research initiatives,” said Mark W. Lauroesch, IPO Executive Director. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents is a report which demonstrates the critical role universities play in patents, licensing and commercialization.”

IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2017 will be released for the 35th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2017 calendar year. For patents with one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected].

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions, and growing rapidly. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO
The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

 

RENOWNED RESEARCHERS, POLICYMAKERS, AND ACADEMIC LEADERS TO CONVERGE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. FOR 2018 NAI CONFERENCE

The Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 4-6

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Over 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Washington, D.C. on April 4-6 for the Seventh Annual Conference of the NAI. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Ronald M. Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies; David J. Skorton, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the City College of New York and president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will also include the NAI’s second annual Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s seventh annual conference is “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Intersection of Innovation and the Future, Intersection of Ideas and Entrepreneurship, and Intersection of Academia, Government, and Industry. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

“Our nation’s capital provides a fitting backdrop as we explore the intersections of academia, industry, and government in the innovation space,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The conference program engages with these wide-ranging facets of academic invention through timely panels and presentations, the induction of the newest class of NAI Fellows, and the Student Innovation Showcase. I look forward to three days of networking and learning with our attendees, while honoring the amazing accomplishments of our members.”

The NAI will induct the newest class of Fellows on April 5 at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“I am honored to join the NAI as the annual conference returns to Washington for another year of insightful programming,” Hirshfeld said. “The NAI has initiated an exciting dialogue on academic innovation that continues to gain momentum. I look forward to recognizing the next class of NAI Fellows and their substantial contributions in academic discovery and innovation which improve our quality of life and influence the next generation of thought leaders.”

Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs. In addition, over $137 billion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries. Among all NAI Fellows there are over 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, more than 440 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 37 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, and 29 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

The meeting will conclude with NAI’s Student Innovation Showcase. The showcase, in its second year, offers a unique platform for students to demonstrate world-changing inventions to the highest caliber of innovators. Six interdisciplinary student teams from prestigious research universities, including The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, University of South Florida, University of Southern California, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Worcester Polytechnic University have been invited to exhibit their inventions to a panel of prolific inventors.

“As both an inventor and administrator, I cannot overemphasize the importance of fostering young inventors throughout their academic trajectories,” said Helena Wisniewski, vice provost for research & graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NAI Fellow, and Student Innovation Showcase judge. “I am delighted to see the NAI continue to engage its network of prominent academic inventors to support the next generation of innovators, and I look forward to serving as a judge for the Student Innovation Showcase.”

A detailed agenda is available at https://www.academyofinventors.org/conference/docs/2018-nai-conference-preliminary-agenda.pdf. Invited papers from the conference will be published in the NAI journal Technology and Innovation. To learn more about Technology and Innovation, visit https://www.academyofinventors.org/ti/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. Learn more at www.academyofinventors.org.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2017 FELLOWS

155 academic inventors honored with esteemed distinction

TAMPA, Fla., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 155 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“Congratulations to the exceptional academic inventors who comprise the 2017 class of NAI Fellows,” said Shirley Malcom, Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It was my privilege to support the important mission of the NAI as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee. The NAI Fellows Program plays a vital role in bringing to the forefront the essential scientific and economic contributions of our nation’s inventors.”

On 5 Apr. 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference in Washington, DC. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Commissioner for Patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“Once again, I am in awe of the inventors elected as NAI Fellows. It was my honor to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and participate in this unique recognition of impactful patented contributions to science and technology,” Hirshfeld said, “I look forward to celebrating this remarkable group at the 2018 NAI Conference at the Smithsonian American Art Museum which was once known as the Temple of Invention during its years as the first dedicated home of the U.S. Patent Office. This historic national landmark serves as an extremely fitting location to once again showcase inventors and their technologies.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention—their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

The 2017 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full-page announcement in the 19 Jan. 2018 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Science and Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors.

2017 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Samuel I. Achilefu, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dereje Agonafer, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Mark G. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Hiroshi Amano, Nagoya University
  • Richard R. Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Leif Andersson, Texas A&M University and Uppsala University
  • J. Roger P. Angel, The University of Arizona
  • Diran Apelian, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Plamen B. Atanassov, The University of New Mexico
  • Craig H. Benson, University of Virginia
  • Cory J. Berkland, The University of Kansas
  • Vijayakumar Bhagavatula, Carnegie Mellon University
  • David J. Bishop, Boston University
  • Donald L. Bitzer, North Carolina State University
  • Randy D. Blakely, Florida Atlantic University
  • Helen M. Blau, Stanford University
  • Timothy M. Block, Baruch S. Blumberg Institute
  • Daniel J. Blumenthal, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Susmita Bose, Washington State University
  • Steven T. Boyce, University of Cincinnati
  • Edward S. Boyden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Anthony B. Brennan, University of Florida
  • Carrie L. Byington, Texas A&M University
  • Marvin H. Caruthers, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Dennis S. Charney, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky
  • Yet Ming Chiang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joanne Chory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mooi Choo Chuah, Lehigh University
  • David E. Clemmer, Indiana University
  • Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University
  • Stanley N. Cohen, Stanford University
  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Pieter Cullis, The University of British Columbia
  • Mari Dezawa, Tohoku University
  • William L. Ditto, North Carolina State University
  • Prabir K. Dutta, The Ohio State University
  • Jack A. Elias, Brown University
  • Zhigang Z. Fang, The University of Utah
  • Tim A. Fischell, Michigan State University and Western Michigan University
  • Paul B. Fisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Edward P. Furlani, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Guangping Gao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University
  • Bruce E. Gnade, Southern Methodist University
  • Lawrence Gold, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sheila A. Grant, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Mark A. Griswold, Case Western Reserve University
  • Horng-Jyh Harn, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital
  • Robert W. Heath, Jr., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Walter Brown Herbst, Northwestern University
  • Mark C. Hersam, Northwestern University
  • David M. Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ming Hsieh, University of Southern California
  • Ian W. Hunter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Mikko Hupa, Åbo Akademi University
  • Oliver C. Ibe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  • Eric D. Isaacs, The University of Chicago
  • Subramanian S. Iyer, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Joseph A. Izatt, Duke University
  • William R. Jacobs, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University
  • Stephen Albert Johnston, Arizona State University
  • Ranu Jung, Florida International University
  • Brian L. Justus, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
  • Alexander V. Kabanov, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aravinda Kar, University of Central Florida
  • Kazunori Kataoka, The University of Tokyo
  • Howard E. Katz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Arie E. Kaufman, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Donald B. Keck, University of South Florida
  • Jeffery W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute
  • David V. Kerns, Jr., Olin College of Engineering
  • Robert S. Keynton, University of Louisville
  • Dennis K. Killinger, University of South Florida
  • Kwang J. Kim, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Wayne H. Knox, University of Rochester
  • Philip T. Kortum, Rice University
  • Philip T. Krein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • John J. La Scala, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Jonathan J. Langberg, Emory University
  • Sang Yup Lee, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Fred C. Lee, Virginia Tech
  • Eric C. Leuthardt, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology
  • Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California, Berkeley
  • Chih-Yuan Lu, National Taiwan University
  • Zhenqiang Ma, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michele Marcolongo, Drexel University
  • Laura Marcu, University of California, Davis
  • R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University
  • Gary S. Margules, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mary Helen McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Kishor C. Mehta, Texas Tech University
  • Deirdre R. Meldrum, Arizona State University
  • Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
  • Gregory Moller, University of Idaho
  • Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., University of Maryland
  • Shouleh Nikzad, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • John R. Nottingham, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic
  • Mariappan P. Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Christopher R. Parish, The Australian National University
  • Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dennis W. Prather, University of Delaware
  • Paul R. Prucnal, Princeton University
  • Nirmala Ramanujam, Duke University
  • Jennifer L. Rexford, Princeton University
  • Kenner C. Rice, National Institutes of Health
  • Camillo Ricordi, University of Miami
  • Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Bruce R. Rosen, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Barbara O. Rothbaum, Emory University
  • Jonathan M. Rothberg, Yale University
  • Max F. Rothschild, Iowa State University
  • Clinton T. Rubin, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Henry Samueli, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine
  • Ulrich S. Schubert, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
  • Paul A. Seib, Kansas State University
  • Terrence J. Sejnowski, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mohammad Shahidehpour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Yun-Qing Shi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Subhash L. Shinde, University of Notre Dame
  • Richard W. Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Krishna P. Singh, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hyongsok T. Soh, Stanford University
  • Steven L. Stice, University of Georgia
  • Steven L. Suib, University of Connecticut
  • Russell H. Taylor, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jeffrey A. Toretsky, Georgetown University
  • Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh and The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Robert Vince, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew J. Viterbi, University of Southern California
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, Duke University
  • Scott A. Waldman, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Thomas A. Waldmann, National Cancer Institute
  • Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Fei Wang, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Scott C. Weaver, The University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Thomas J. Webster, Northeastern University
  • Chin-Long Wey, National Chiao Tung University
  • Lorne Whitehead, The University of British Columbia
  • Cheryl L. Willman, The University of New Mexico
  • Alan N. Willson, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Teresa K. Woodruff, Northwestern University
  • Amy E. Wright, Florida Atlantic University
  • Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley
  • Paul Yager, University of Washington
  • Jackie Y. Ying, Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Bin Yu, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
  • Mona E. Zaghloul, The George Washington University
  • Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University
  • Lynn Zechiedrich, Baylor College of Medicine

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. UTILITY PATENTS FOR 2016 ANNOUNCED

Top University Patent Holders Unveiled in Report by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 has been announced by The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data is obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to compile the report which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report, which has been published each year since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, collects the rankings by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report can be found at: www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes, products and treatments which provide significant societal benefit as well as generate job creation that sustains and helps grow our local, regional and global economy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “It is an honor to recognize the top patent holders through this report in collaboration with IPO for the fifth consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2016 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, California Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, The University of Texas System, University of Michigan, and Columbia University.

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NAI CONFERENCE TO BRING WORLD RENOWNED ACADEMIC INVENTORS AND ASPIRING INNOVATORS TO BOSTON

The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 5-7

BOSTON, April 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Nearly 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Boston April 5-7 for the Sixth Annual Conference. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, IBM’s most prolific female inventor, and H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The meeting also will include the NAI’s inaugural Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s sixth annual conference is “Recognizing Pillars of Academic Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Changing the Academic Innovation Landscape, Issues Relating to Public Policy and Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Drive the Future of Innovation. Presenters include academic luminaries among the NAI’s members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

The NAI will induct the newly elected Fellows on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“It is an honor to once again participate in the NAI’s Annual Conference and the induction of some of our nation’s most esteemed academic inventors,” Hirshfeld said. “It is extremely gratifying to watch the NAI grow into one of the leading organizations that promotes invention by emphasizing the role of patents. I look forward to honoring the newest class of NAI Fellows and their vital contributions to society.”

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NAI FELLOWS AMONG FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Four NAI Fellows Recognized for Innovative Contributions to State of Florida

TAMPA, Fla. – Four National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows are among the eight inventors elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the nation.

NAI Fellows elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame include:

Issa Batarseh, director of the Energy System Integration Division at the Florida Power Electronics Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Central Florida, was elected for innovative research which led to the creation of the first compact single solar photovoltaic (PV) panel.

Kenneth M. Ford, co-founder and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, was elected for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence and human-centered computing.

Richard D. Gitlin, State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida, was elected for his inventive research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems.

T. Dwayne McCay, president and CEO of the Florida Institute of Technology, is being inducted along with his wife, Mary Helen McCay, for their novel approaches to laser induced surface improvements.

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame was recognized by the Florida Senate in 2014 with a resolution sponsored by Senator Jeff Brandes that commended the Hall of Fame “for its commitment to honoring inventors and celebrating innovation, discovery, and excellence.” The Hall of Fame is located at the University of South Florida in Tampa and supported, in part, by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The newly elected Hall of Fame innovators be inducted at the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame 4th Annual Induction Ceremony & Gala on Sep. 8, 2017, at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

A complete list of Florida Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, including biographical information, is available here: www.FloridaInvents.org.

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BILL INTRODUCED TO GRANT FEDERAL CHARTER TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS

Congressman Dennis Ross Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Recognize the NAI’s Role in Advancing Academic Innovation

TAMPA, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – U.S. Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-FL-15) has introduced H.R. 976, a bill to grant federal charter to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). This bipartisan legislation would recognize the importance of the NAI’s mission of advancing a culture where academic invention and innovation is celebrated for its role in fueling our nation’s economy.

The NAI is a non-profit member organization comprised of more than 240 U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with more than 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows.

H.R. 976 would provide an honorific designation symbolizing the significance of the NAI’s mission, goals and objectives in benefiting the public. The charter would also allow NAI members to be called upon as advisors by any department of the government. NAI members are contributors to fields including medicine, cybersecurity, veteran’s research, and engineering among many others.

The NAI Fellows Program has 757 Fellows worldwide representing more than 229 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in July 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with more than $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“NAI members among our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies and translating them into innovative products, processes, cures, and treatments, for the betterment of society,” Ross said, “I am proud to introduce this important bill to help further the mission of the NAI and allow their members to serve our government as subject matter experts on innovation, intellectual property, translational research and commercialization.”

The NAI is seeking additional support for this bill which currently has two original co-sponsors including: Daniel Lipinski [IL-3] and Rep. Kathy Castor [FL-14].

“We are very grateful to Congressman Ross and the supporting co-sponsors for introducing this important charter bill which recognizes the vital role academic innovation plays in moving our nation forward,” said Paul R. Sanberg, the NAI’s founder and president and the Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation & Economic Development at the University of South Florida.

“For generations, America’s academic inventors have been at the forefront of modernizing every aspect of our lives and keeping our nation economically strong and competitive. A federal charter for the National Academy of Inventors serves the public good in supporting intellectual property, translational research and commercialization. We are honored to be considered for this recognition and to continue the NAI’s work in supporting and advancing the cause of innovation and invention.”

For more information on how to encourage your congressional delegation to support this initiative, please contact Keara Leach at 813-974-5862, [email protected].

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2016 FELLOWS

Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 94 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 376 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 28 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 45 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 28 Nobel Laureates, 216 AAAS Fellows, 126 IEEE Fellows, and 116 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in Jul. 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with over $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

On 6 Apr. 2017, the 2016 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Andrew H. Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“I look forward to welcoming and honoring the 2016 class of Fellows to Boston in April,” said Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering at Northeastern University and NAI Fellow. “The NAI has once again unveiled a prolific group of academic inventors who produce vitally important discoveries for the betterment of society.”

“With each year I continue to be amazed by the caliber of individuals named as NAI Fellows and the 2016 class is no exception,” said U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld. “Congratulations to this very deserving group of distinguished academic innovators. I was honored to once again serve as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee and look forward to recognizing this new group of innovative leaders at the induction ceremony this spring.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to innovation in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 Jan. 2017 issue, and in upcoming issues of Inventors Digest and NAI journal Technology and Innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows were evaluated by the 2016 Selection Committee included 19 members, comprising NAI Fellows, recipients of U.S. National Medals, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“It is exciting to see the NAI Fellows Program continue to grow and honor the world’s most impactful academic inventors each year,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The 2016 Fellows exude innovative excellence and we feel truly privileged to welcome them to the Academy and recognize their remarkable contributions to discovery and invention.”

2016 Elected NAI Fellows

  • David Akopian, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kamal S. Ali, Jackson State University
  • A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carl R. Alving, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Hamid Arastoopour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Arsenault, Tufts University
  • B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University
  • Zhenan Bao, Stanford University
  • Richard G. Baraniuk, Rice University
  • Francis Barany, Cornell University
  • Jean-Marie Basset, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Paula J. Bates, University of Louisville
  • Craig C. Beeson, Medical University of South Carolina
  • K. Darrell Berlin, Oklahoma State University
  • Sarit B. Bhaduri, The University of Toledo
  • Pallab K. Bhattacharya, University of Michigan
  • Dieter H. Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • Christopher N. Bowman, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Barbara D. Boyan, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Mindy M. Brashears, Texas Tech University
  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ruben G. Carbonell, North Carolina State University
  • John F. Carpenter, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Raghunath V. Chaudhari, The University of Kansas
  • Liang-Gee Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Simon R. Cherry, University of California, Davis
  • Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Adrienne E. Clarke, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Rita R. Colwell, University of Maryland
  • Diane J. Cook, Washington State University
  • Peter A. Crooks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Riccardo Dalla-Favera, Columbia University
  • Suman Datta, University of Notre Dame
  • Delbert E. Day, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roger A. de la Torre, University of Missouri
  • Stephen W. Director, Northeastern University
  • Jeffrey L. Duerk, Case Western Reserve University
  • James L. Dye, Michigan State University
  • Richard L. Ehman, Mayo Clinic
  • Gary A. Eiceman, New Mexico State University
  • Ali Emadi, McMaster University, Canada
  • Ronald M. Evans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Stanley Falkow, Stanford University
  • Hany Farid, Dartmouth College
  • Shane M. Farritor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Philippe M. Fauchet, Vanderbilt University
  • Denise L. Faustman, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • David R. Fischell, Cornell University
  • Vincent A. Fischetti, The Rockefeller University
  • David P. Fries, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Kenneth G. Furton, Florida International University
  • Kanad Ghose, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Juan E. Gilbert, University of Florida
  • Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco
  • Herbert Gleiter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Dan M. Goebel, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Forouzan Golshani, California State University, Long Beach
  • Lorne M. Golub, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • John B. Goodenough, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael Graetzel, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Robert J. Greenberg, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research
  • Richard M. Greenwald, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick G. Halbur, Iowa State University
  • Henry R. Halperin, Johns Hopkins University
  • Amy E. Herr, University of California, Berkeley
  • D. Craig Hooper, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Edward A. Hoover, Colorado State University
  • Oliver Yoa-Pu Hu, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan
  • David Huang, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Mark S. Humayun, University of Southern California
  • Joseph P. Iannotti, Cleveland Clinic
  • Enrique Iglesia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sungho Jin, University of California, San Diego
  • Barry W. Johnson, University of Virginia
  • William L. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • John L. Junkins, Texas A&M University
  • Michelle Khine, University of California, Irvine
  • John Klier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Thomas J. Kodadek, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Harold L. Kohn, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Steven M. Kuznicki, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Enrique J. Lavernia, University of California, Irvine
  • Nicholas J. Lawrence, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Leslie A. Leinwand, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Frances S. Ligler, North Carolina State University
  • Yilu Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jennifer K. Lodge, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Mandi J. Lopez, Louisiana State University
  • Gabriel P. López, The University of New Mexico
  • Surya K. Mallapragada, Iowa State University
  • Seth R. Marder, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University
  • Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation-India
  • Kouki Matsuse, Meiji University, Japan
  • Martin M. Matzuk, Baylor University
  • T. Dwayne McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • James W. McGinity, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Thomas J. Meade, Northwestern University
  • Katrina L. Mealey, Washington State University
  • Edward W. Merrill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Paul L. Modrich, Duke University
  • David J. Mooney, Harvard University
  • H. Keith Moo-Young, Washington State University Tri-Cities
  • Israel J. Morejon, University of South Florida
  • Harold L. Moses, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph R. Moskal, Northwestern University
  • Nazim Z. Muradov, University of Central Florida
  • Nicholas Muzyczka, University of Florida
  • Lakshmi S. Nair, University of Connecticut
  • Shrikanth S. Narayanan, University of Southern California
  • Ellen Ochoa, NASA Johnson Space Center
  • Erin K. O’Shea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Francis A. Papay, Cleveland Clinic
  • Kevin J. Parker, University of Rochester
  • Yvonne J. Paterson, University of Pennsylvania
  • George N. Pavlakis, National Institutes of Health
  • Kenneth H. Perlin, New York University
  • Nasser Peyghambarian, The University of Arizona
  • Gary A. Piazza, University of South Alabama
  • Christophe Pierre, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Michael C. Pirrung, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael V. Pishko, University of Wyoming
  • Garth Powis, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Paras N. Prasad, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ronald T. Raines, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Michael P. Rastatter, East Carolina University
  • Jacob Richter, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Richard E. Riman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Andrew G. Rinzler, University of Florida
  • Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University
  • Nabeel A. Riza, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Kenneth J. Rothschild, Boston University
  • Stuart H. Rubin, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center
  • Linda J. Saif, The Ohio State University
  • Sudeep Sarkar, University of South Florida
  • John T. Schiller, National Institutes of Health
  • Diane G. Schmidt, University of Cincinnati
  • Wayne S. Seames, University of North Dakota
  • Michael S. Shur, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University
  • Mrityunjay Singh, Ohio Aerospace Institute
  • Kamalesh K. Sirkar, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • David R. Smith, Duke University
  • James E. Smith, West Virginia University
  • Terrance P. Snutch, The University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University
  • Gerald Sonnenfeld, The University of Rhode Island
  • James S. Speck, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Bruce W. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman University
  • Kenneth S. Suslick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark J. Suto, Southern Research Institute
  • Yu-Chong Tai, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Tansu, Lehigh University
  • Fleur T. Tehrani, California State University, Fullerton
  • Marc T. Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford University
  • Madhukar (Mathew) L. Thakur, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Mehmet Toner, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan T. Vilcek, New York University
  • Anil V. Virkar, The University of Utah
  • John F. Wager, Oregon State University
  • William R. Wagner, University of Pittsburgh
  • Isiah M. Warner, Louisiana State University
  • John D. Weete, Auburn University
  • Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University
  • Ralph Weissleder, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas M. Weller, University of South Florida
  • Jennifer L. West, Duke University
  • Amnon Yariv, California Institute of Technology
  • Yun Yen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Warren M. Zapol, Massachusetts General Hospital

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS FOR 2015 ANNOUNCED

NAI and IPO Release Report on Top University Patent Holders for Fourth Time

TAMPA, Fla. (Jul. 12, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2015. The report utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent.

“The rate at which our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies is growing faster than ever and it is an honor to recognize these institutions for their amazing work,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We thank the IPO for collaborating with the NAI for the fourth year in a row on this ranking which confirms the importance of supporting research and innovation within academia.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, The University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan.

“IPO is proud to once again release this important report with the NAI to highlight the tremendous work in patents being done at universities,” said IPO Executive Director, Mark W. Lauroesch. “Inventive ecosystems continue to grow around universities, sparking a culture in which academics and innovation go hand-in-hand producing technologies which stimulate not only local and regional economies but the global economy.”

IPO’s 33rd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2015 was also recently released. The top 10 universities on the 2015 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2015 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS SIGN MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH US PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

NAI and USPTO officials signed agreement during NAI’s Fifth Annual Conference

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (April 26, 2016) – Russell Slifer, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and deputy director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), signed a Memorandum of Agreement during the NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, the closing event for the NAI’s fifth annual conference on April 15, 2016.

The agreement outlines the opportunity for the USPTO and the NAI to work closely on mutually beneficial projects to enrich education outreach, honors and awards, and programs relating to intellectual property. The agreement includes a commitment from the NAI to host its annual meeting every other year at USPTO headquarters.

“It has been our pleasure at the USPTO, for the last five years to have a relationship with the Academy and it is my pleasure also to sign our Memorandum of Agreement,” said Slifer. “We will continue to cooperate to host events and awards. The NAI annual meeting will continue to be held here every other year, which will allow for our employees to meet with NAI members and Fellows to discuss how the work they are doing comes together to help the nation and innovators around the world.”

David Kappos, former Under Secretary of Commerce and previous director of the USPTO, embraced the NAI soon after it was founded in 2010 and suggested the need for a higher level program for leading academic inventors to be honored and recognized for their contributions to society.

In his speech at the 2012 NAI annual meeting in Tampa, Kappos said, “The NAI is a breakthrough for our country. It couldn’t be more timely to have an organization like this to be championing innovation.”

“We are very grateful that the USPTO has provided vital support to the NAI since our inception,” said Sanberg. “We are pleased to announce the signing of this Memorandum of Agreement which solidifies our important friendship and we look forward to a bright future of collaborations.”

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FELLOWS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS INDUCTED AT UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

2015 keynote speech provided by U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) – U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld provided the keynote address for the induction ceremony of the 2015 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors at the NAI’s fifth annual conference, held this year in Washington D.C. on Apr. 14-15.

Over 325 inventors and academic leaders attended the conference, which featured presentations and panels by more than 30 distinguished scientists and innovators including keynote addresses by Victor J. Dzau, President of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow; Cristin A. Dorgelo, Chief of Staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; and Emery N. Brown, MIT Professor and NAI Fellow.

“It was an honor to participate in the NAI’s fifth annual meeting as a featured speaker,” said Brown. “The NAI fills a vital need by bringing together innovators from across disciplines to be recognized for their groundbreaking contributions in research, patents and commercialization. I am honored to be a Fellow of this important national organization.”

At the ceremony held on Apr. 15 at the USPTO, Hirshfeld and Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI and Charter Fellow, presented the 2015 class of Fellows with a trophy, medal and rosette pin honoring their contributions as academic inventors. Of the 168 innovators elected to the 2015 class, more than 130 were in attendance.

“I am personally inspired and grateful to be amongst this distinguished group and join in recognizing you today,” said Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, during his keynote address. “You have truly enhanced the quality of life for our nation and we thank you for your innovative contributions. As inventive researchers who are leaders in all fields of academia, we are eager to learn from your expertise and collaborate on future educational initiatives.”

The NAI Fellows Program has 582 Fellows worldwide representing more than 190 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 20,000 issued U.S. patents.

The collective NAI Fellows now include more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the three branches of the National Academy of Sciences, 27 Nobel Laureates, 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 36 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 14 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows among other awards and distinctions.

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors,” said Illinois Institute of Technology President Alan W. Cramb. “Being named in the same category as other globally distinguished innovators and inventors in the NAI is a privilege.”

Nominations for 2016 Fellows will open Jul. 1 and can be submitted online through Oct. 1 at AcademyofInventors.org. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted and honored at the 2017 NAI Annual Conference, to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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U.S. COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE PRESIDENT SPEAK AT NAI CONFERENCE

The 5th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 14-15 in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 11, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors will celebrate its fifth annual conference by returning to Washington, D.C., Apr. 14-15, 2016. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents and Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow.

The theme of the NAI’s fifth conference is “Building on Foundations of Innovation” to explore the interaction between the United States’ history of change and the modern culture and leadership of innovation.

Keynote speeches by Cristin Dorgelo, chief of staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Emery Brown, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NAI Fellow, along with presentations and panels on innovation by more than 35 prolific scientists and academic leaders, round out the conference program.

Highlights also include a signature gala at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the induction of the 2015 Fellows of the NAI—the conference’s closing event—at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, with a keynote address by Hirshfeld.

“It is a pleasure to commemorate the Academy’s milestone fifth annual meeting by welcoming the NAI back to Washington,” said Hirshfeld. “I look forward to recognizing the new distinguished class of NAI Fellows. These true champions of academic invention have made tremendous contributions to society through their amazing innovations.”

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2015 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators honored with prestigious distinction

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 leaders of invention and innovation to Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing over 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2015 Fellows account for 5,368 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, NAM), 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 32 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 27 Nobel Laureates, 14 Lemelson-MIT Prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on 15 Apr. 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

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2015 Elected NAI Fellows

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dean P. Alderucci, The University of Chicago
  • Jayakrishna Ambati, University of Kentucky
  • Iver E. Anderson, Iowa State University
  • Kristi S. Anseth, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Allen W. Apblett, Oklahoma State University
  • Charles J. Arntzen, Arizona State University
  • Harry A. Atwater, Jr., California Inst. of Technology
  • Lorne A. Babiuk, University of Alberta
  • John M. Ballato, Clemson University
  • John S. Baras, University of Maryland
  • Issa Batarseh, University of Central Florida
  • Ray H. Baughman, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Angela M. Belcher, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Stephen J. Benkovic, The Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Shekhar Bhansali, Florida International University
  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • John D. Birdwell, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Kenneth J. Blank, Rowan University
  • Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University
  • John E. Bowers, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gary L. Bowlin, University of Memphis
  • C. Jeffrey Brinker, The University of New Mexico
  • Richard B. Brown, The University of Utah
  • Emery N. Brown, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Milton L. Brown, Georgetown University
  • Steven R.J. Brueck, The University of New Mexico
  • Joe C. Campbell, University of Virginia
  • Selim A. Chacour, University of South Florida
  • Mau-Chung Frank Chang, Nat. Chiao Tung Univ.
  • Shu Chien, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Diana S. Chow, University of Houston
  • Chung K. (David) Chu, University of Georgia
  • Yoginder P. Chugh, Southern Illinois University
  • William J. Clancey, IHMC
  • Katrina Cornish, The Ohio State University
  • Delos M. (Toby) Cosgrove III, Cleveland Clinic
  • Alan W. Cramb, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Benjamin F. Cravatt III, The Scripps Research Inst.
  • Roy Curtiss III, University of Florida
  • Paul D. Dapkus, University of Southern California
  • John G. Daugman, University of Cambridge
  • Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology
  • Robert C. Dean, Jr., Dartmouth College
  • Atam P. Dhawan, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Duane B. Dimos, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • David M. Eddy, University of South Florida
  • Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania
  • Antonio Facchetti, Northwestern University
  • Rudolf Faust, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland
  • Christodoulos A. Floudas, Texas A&M University
  • Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri
  • Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
  • Jean M.J. Fréchet, KAUST
  • Richard H. Frenkiel, Rutgers University
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Stanford University
  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, University of Missouri
  • Sir Andre K. Geim, The University of Manchester
  • George Georgiou, The University of Texas at Austin
  • John C. Gore, Vanderbilt University
  • Venu Govindaraju, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ali Hajimiri, California Inst. of Technology
  • Naomi J. Halas, Rice University
  • Andrew D. Hamilton, University of Oxford
  • Wayne W. Hanna, University of Georgia
  • Florence P. Haseltine, National Institutes of Health
  • Charlotte A.E. Hauser, KAUST
  • Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • M. Frederick Hawthorne, University of Missouri
  • Barton F. Haynes, Duke University
  • Richard F. Heck, University of Delaware
  • Andrew B. Holmes, The University of Melbourne
  • Rush D. Holt, AAAS
  • H. Robert Horvitz, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Chenming C. Hu, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Leon D. Iasemidis, Louisiana Tech University
  • Mir Imran, University of Pittsburgh
  • Donald E. Ingber, Harvard University
  • Chennupati Jagadish, The Australian National Univ.
  • Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University
  • Kristina M. Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Joseph S. Kalinowski, East Carolina University
  • Aaron V. Kaplan, Dartmouth College
  • Usha N. Kasid, Georgetown University
  • Kenneth W. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University
  • Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University
  • Steven J. Kubisen, The George Washington Univ.
  • Donald W. Landry, Columbia University
  • Se-Jin Lee, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sunggyu Lee, Ohio University
  • Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke University
  • G. Douglas Letson, Moffitt Cancer & Research Inst.
  • Jennifer A. Lewis, Harvard University
  • Guifang Li, University of Central Florida
  • James C. Liao, Univ. of California, Los Angeles
  • John S. (Pete) Lollar III, Emory University
  • Anthony M. Lowman, Rowan University
  • Rodney S. Markin, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University
  • Dean F. Martin, University of South Florida
  • Helen S. Mayberg, Emory University
  • Patrick L. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Edith G. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center
  • Thomas E. Milner, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Umesh K. Mishra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Somenath Mitra, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Andreas F. Molisch, University of Southern California
  • Ramani Narayan, Michigan State University
  • Alan C. Nelson, Arizona State University
  • Kyriacos C. Nicolaou, Rice University
  • David R. Nygren, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • Richard M. Osgood, Jr., Columbia University
  • Alyssa Panitch, Purdue University
  • Heloise A. Pereira, OUHSC
  • William M. Pierce, Jr., University of Louisville
  • John M. Poate, Colorado School of Mines
  • H. Vincent, Poor, Princeton University
  • Ann Progulske-Fox, University of Florida
  • Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington
  • Kaushik Rajashekara, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas
  • Jahangir S. Rastegar, Stony Brook University
  • A. Hari Reddi, Univ. of California, Davis
  • E. Albert Reece, University of Maryland
  • Kenneth L. Reifsnider, The Univ. of TX at Arlington
  • Jasper D. Rine, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Ajeet Rohatgi, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Stephen D. Russell, SPAWAR
  • Michael J. Sailor, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Bahgat G. Sammakia, Binghamton University
  • Andrew V. Schally, University of Miami
  • Paul R. Schimmel, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Peter G. Schultz, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University
  • Jonathan L. Sessler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Mohsen Shahinpour, University of Maine
  • Benjamin A. Shneiderman, University of Maryland
  • Marvin J. Slepian, The University of Arizona
  • Kwok-Fai So, The University of Hong Kong
  • Richard A. Soref, Univ. of Massachusetts Boston
  • Pramod K. Srivastava, University of Connecticut
  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati
  • Valentino J. Stella, The University of Kansas
  • Galen D. Stucky, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bala Subramaniam, The University of Kansas
  • R. Michael Tanner, APLU
  • Guillermo J. Tearney, Harvard University
  • Stephen Tomlinson, Medical Univ. of South Carolina
  • James M. Tour, Rice University
  • Kalliat T. Valsaraj, Louisiana State University
  • Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Purdue University
  • Norman J. Wagner III, University of Delaware
  • Yong Wang, Washington State University
  • James A. Wells, Univ. of California, San Francisco
  • Jay F. Whitacre, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caroline C. Whitacre, The Ohio State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, Univ. of Alaska Anchorage
  • Edward D. Wolf, Cornell University
  • Paul K. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • James C. Wyant, The University of Arizona
  • Pan-Chyr Yang, National Taiwan University
  • Yu-Dong Yao, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Martin L. Yarmush, Rutgers University
  • Jim P. Zheng, Florida State University

NAI AND IPO RELEASE TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (June 16, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

“The NAI is delighted to be releasing this list of the leading innovative universities in the world in conjunction with the IPO for the third year in a row,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “The data once again proves that innovation based on university technology continues to be a key factor in economic development and a fundamental element to the success of a university.”

In conjunction, the IPO will soon be releasing their 32nd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations worldwide that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2014. The top 13 universities on the 2014 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2014 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

“Patents make enormous contributions to U.S innovation, leading to more jobs in U.S. industry and new strength in the economy,” said IPO Executive Director Herbert C. Wamsley. “These innovations help solidify the transfer of cutting-edge research to the marketplace, producing revenue and potentially increasing research funding by providing corporations and businesses the incentive to invest in university projects.”

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2014 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research, or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected]

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2014 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators elected to high honor

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 16, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 170 distinguished innovators to NAI Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 414, representing more than 150 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions.

Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leadership of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 208 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, IOM), 21 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 16 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, 10 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Science, 21 Nobel Laureates, 11 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 112 AAAS Fellows, and 62 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Collectively, the 414 NAI Fellows hold nearly 14,000 U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on Mar. 20, 2015, as part of the 4th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Deputy Commissioner for Patent Operations Andrew Faile will be providing the keynote address for the induction ceremony. Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, newly designed medal, and rosette pin in honor of their outstanding accomplishments.

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NAI MEMBER INSTITUTIONS DOMINATE NSF I-CORPS TEAM AWARDS

Eight of the top 12 universities nationally are NAI members

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 25, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors today recognized NAI Member Institutions with teams selected in 2014 for the Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Team program by the National Science Foundation. The 82 teams from NAI member universities comprise 54 percent of all teams nationwide receiving I-Corps Team awards this year.

Among the top 12 universities receiving the awards, eight are from NAI member universities, including, at #1, University of Michigan with 13 teams; #3, University of South Florida with five teams; #4, Carnegie-Mellon University with four teams; and tied for #5 with three teams each, Arizona State University, Florida State University, Lehigh University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nationally, 153 teams from 91 universities were selected for I-Corps Team awards in 2014. Each team receives a $50,000 grant and participates in an I-Corps Teams curriculum designed to provide hands-on, immersive learning for researchers on what it takes to successfully transition research out of the laboratory into commercially feasible products that benefit society.

“We are proud our Member Institutions are leading the way in this groundbreaking program.” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors and a AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador. “Their work contributes to economic prosperity in their communities, states and our nation.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) established the I-Corps Teams program to identify NSF-funded researchers, and provide them mentoring and funding in order to accelerate the translation of knowledge derived from fundamental research into emerging products and services.

“This is a powerful economic development initiative by the NSF,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development at Arizona State University, one of the top 12 universities receiving awards this year. “The I-Corps Team program is designed to create a national innovation ecology and will have a high impact.”

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NAI member institutions receiving NSI I-Corps Team Awards in 2014

Arizona State University

Auburn University

Boise State University

Carnegie-Mellon University

Colorado State University

Columbia University

Cornell University

Drexel University

Florida International University

Florida State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana Tech University

Missouri University of Science and Technology

New Mexico State University

New York University

Ohio State University

Oklahoma State University

Purdue University

Rutgers University New Brunswick

Stevens Institute of Technology

SUNY at Buffalo

SUNY at Stony Brook

Temple University

Texas Tech University

University of Akron

University of Arizona

University of California-Berkeley

University of California-Davis

University of Cincinnati Main Campus

University of Florida

University of Georgia Research Foundation Inc

University of Houston

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky Research Foundation

University of Maryland College Park

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Michigan Ann Arbor

University of North Texas

University of South Carolina at Columbia

University of South Florida

University of Toledo

University of Wisconsin-Madison

WHY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BRINGS UNIVERSITIES
‘MORE THAN MONEY’

Many benefits of tech transfer to universities beyond revenues from licenses & royalties

TAMPA, Fla. (June 26, 2014) – Academic technology transfer – the process of moving research from the lab to the market – provides intrinsic benefits to universities that go far beyond any potential revenues from licenses and royalties.

So say the authors, from five universities across the country and the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), in a new article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) that appears in the current issue of Technology and Innovation and is available Open Access.

“More than Money: The Exponential Impact of Academic Technology Transfer” is the work of lead author Valerie Landrio McDevitt, former associate vice president at the University of South Florida (USF) and current executive director of AUTM, and co-authors, Joelle Mendez-Hinds of USF, David Winwood of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Vinit Nijhawan of Boston University (BU), Todd Sherer of Emory University, John F. Ritter of Princeton University, and Paul R. Sanberg of USF and the NAI. USF, UAB, BU and Emory are all Charter Member Institutions of the NAI.

According to the authors, the positive benefits of technology transfer for universities can be significant, including: a vibrant culture of entrepreneurship that promotes recruitment and retention of faculty, increased student success through participation in real world research, public benefits from applied research that seeks to address global challenges, economic development, increased opportunities for funding through inter-institutional and interdisciplinary grants, new start-ups and international research relationships, and increased prestige and fundraising from a stronger university brand.

“In the academic setting, technology transfer is a critical component for facilitating and sparking innovation within universities and helping to connect universities with commercial partners in the community,” says co-author Paul R. Sanberg, who is founder and president of the NAI. “Technology transfer can be truly transformational to a university and to the community.”

The authors:

Valerie Landrio McDevitt, a registered patent attorney, is executive director of the Association of University Technology Manager (AUTM). She received her J.D. at Emory University School of Law. Prior to joining AUTM, she served as the associate vice president for technology transfer and business incubation at the University of South Florida. She previously worked as a science advisor with a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., and participated in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellowship program.

Joelle Mendez-Hinds is a patent marketing intern in the Technology Transfer Office/Division of Patents & Licensing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

David Winwood is chief executive officer of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Foundation and senior associate vice president for Economic Development and Innovation Alliances. Prior to joining UAB, Winwood served North Carolina State University and The Ohio State University. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness Regional Innovation Initiative Expert Committee and serves on boards of directors for the Council on Governmental Relations, Biotechnology Association of Alabama, Birmingham Venture Club, Innovation Depot, and TechBirmingham.

Vinit Nijhawan, is managing director of the Office of Technology Development and director of Enterprise Programs at the Institute of Technology at Boston University, Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at BU. He received his B.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. He has more than twenty-five years of experience building five startups and was CEO of three of them. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of TiE Global, a non-profit that fosters entrepreneurship globally; special assistant to the vice president of research; and director of the Kindle Mentoring Program at BU.

Todd Sherer, is associate vice president for research administration and executive director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in toxicology at Washington State University. Prior to joining Emory, he was director of the Office of Technology and Research Collaborations at Oregon Health & Science University. He served as president of AUTM and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

John F. Ritter, is director of the Office of Technology Licensing at Princeton University. Prior to joining Princeton, he served as a senior licensing professional at Rutgers University. He is secretary of the Review Panel on Conflict of Interest in Research. He received his J.D. from Rutgers School of Law and his M.B.A from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Paul R. Sanberg, is senior vice president for research and innovation and Distinguished University Professor at the University of South Florida, and founder and president of the National Academy of Inventors. He is an inventor on over 30 licensed health-related U.S. patents and a highly cited author with more than 600 publications. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, NAI, Royal Societies (Medicine, Chemistry and Public Health), AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador, and serves on the evaluation committee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

 

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic InnovationSeventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Lee, University of California, Irvine
  • Anna M. Leese de Escobar, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Warren J. Leonard, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
  • Johannes A. Lercher, Technical University of Munich
  • Teik C. Lim, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Craig W. Lindsley, Vanderbilt University/Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery
  • Elizabeth G. Loboa, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Ted L. Maddess, Australian National University
  • Elizabeth M. McNally, Northwestern University
  • Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ellis Meng, University of Southern California
  • Joachim Messing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Lalit K. Mestha, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Lyle R. Middendorf, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Shaker A. Mousa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
  • William P. Murphy, Jr., Florida International University
  • William L. Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Prakash Nagarkatti, University of South Carolina
  • Nathan Newman, Arizona State University
  • Bert W. O’Malley, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Aydogan Ozcan, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia University
  • Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University
  • Roderic I. Pettigrew, Texas A&M University
  • Apparao M. Rao, Clemson Nanomaterials Institute/Clemson University
  • Theodore S. Rappaport, New York University
  • Rafael Reif, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joshua Rokach, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Yoram Rudy, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wheeler Ruml, University of New Hampshire
  • Thomas P. Russell, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jagannathan Sarangapani, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Vinod Sarin, Boston University
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College
  • Steven J. Sasson, University of South Florida
  • Christine E. Schmidt, University of Florida
  • Zheng John Shen, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Thomas E. Shenk, Princeton University
  • Mark B. Shiflett, University of Kansas
  • Michael L. Simpson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory/The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Koji Sode, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Costas M. Soukoulis, Iowa State University/Ames Laboratory
  • John W. Spirk, Cleveland Clinic
  • Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • William Studier, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University
  • Koduvayur P. Subbalakshmi, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Bruce A. Sullenger, Duke University
  • Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University
  • Jing Sun, University of Michigan
  • Yu Sun, University of Toronto
  • Wanchun Tang, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego
  • Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • David A. Tirrell, California Institute of Technology
  • Don M. Tucker, University of Oregon
  • Jeffrey S. Vitter, The University of Mississippi
  • Israel E. Wachs, Lehigh University
  • Albert Wang, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael S. Waterman, University of Southern California
  • Alan W. Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Louis M. Weiner, Georgetown University
  • Robert G. Wilhelm, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Yushan Yan, University of Delaware
  • Jian Yang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eui-Hyeok Yang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Mark H. Yim, The University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael J. Yost, Medical University of South Carolina
  • James M. Zavislan, University of Rochester
  • Ruiwen Zhang, University of Houston
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine

Beyond Accessibility

Technology & Innovation’s latest issue, “Technologies for Disabilities,” focuses on new solutions and new paradigms for assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2018) Technology & Innovation (T&I), journal of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), has released a new special topic issue titled “Technologies for Disabilities.” The issue delves into revolutionary devices, cutting-edge materials and processes, and new theories on designing for users with disabilities.

In every sector of modern society, technological advancements have transformed the way the world works, travels, communicates, and learns. However, not all have been equal beneficiaries of these innovations.

One billion people – the 15 percent of the world’s population who have some form of disability – have largely been left behind by technologies designed for and targeted towards people without disabilities. The new issue of T&I, (20:1-2) (full text) focuses on researchers who are attempting to correct this disparity by creating revolutionary new devices and radically changing how we design assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

“Enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities has been the goal of much of my research, and it is the goal of this special issue as well,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, vice president of the NAI and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “By designing technology where accessibility is the goal rather than an afterthought, we are setting the stage for better and more inclusive technological solutions.”

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

Two Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors Win Nobel Prizes

James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2018) – James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Allison was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, sharing the honor with Dr. Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Allison and Honjo received the prize “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.”

“I was trying to understand how T cells worked,” Allison told Adam Smith, an interviewer for TheNobelPrize.org. “I figured out this one thing about this negative regulator, and I had this idea that if we just took that off, maybe it would do a better job of killing cancer cells. Turns out it works.”

Allison was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2017. He also received the Wolf Prize in Medicine in 2017, and he received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in 2015.

Arnold received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the directed evolution of enzymes.” She conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes in 1993.

“I was able to look at the problem with a totally fresh set of eyes – a problem that had challenged people since the techniques were available,” Arnold said in a phone interview, moments after receiving the award. “I realized that the way that most people were going about protein engineering was doomed to failure.”

Arnold has since refined the methods that are now routinely used to develop new catalysts. She was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2014. She was also inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014, and she received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2011.

“We are thrilled to congratulate Allison and Arnold on these momentous achievements,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

National Academy of Inventors Releases 2018 Activities Report

The National Academy of Inventors has released its annual Activities Report, which catalogs each of the organization’s programs, membership categories, publications and yearly events.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 2, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) published its annual Activities Report today, which highlights the organization’s major events, programs and members.

The 2018 Activities Report features two new programs: the Senior Member program and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). The Senior Member program welcomes inventors early in their careers who aspire to make an impact on the academic community. GAIN is a mentoring platform exclusively available to NAI members.

“The annual Activities Report is our chance to feature our members and the incredible work they do,” said Spencer Montgomery, NAI Director. “The report spotlights inventors at each of our Sustaining Member Institutions, reviews the 2018 Annual Meeting and explains our newest programs.”

The 2018 Activities Report includes statistics on the impact NAI Fellows make on their communities, including how many companies they have formed, how many jobs they have created and more. The report highlights the NAI’s 2018 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, D.C. last April, which brought together over 450 members of the organization.

The publication provides updates and details on each of the NAI’s programs, including the Fellows program, Senior Member program, GAIN platform, NAI Chapter program and the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It concludes with a list of each member of the 2017 class of Fellows, who were inducted at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

The 2018 Activities Report is available online. Physical copies are available upon request.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches New Membership

The National Academy of Inventors’ Senior Member program honors early-stage inventors and innovators who aspire to make a real impact on society through the patenting and commercialization processes.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 1, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has launched a new membership category, the Senior Member program. The program will recognize and honor early-stage academic inventors who aspire to make a real impact on society through invention and innovation. 

The NAI Senior Member program seeks active researchers and professionals who demonstrate success in patenting, licensing and commercialization activities, and foster a spirit of innovation through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

“The Senior Member program is an exciting addition to our existing membership,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “Inventors who seek to influence and support the academic invention ecosystem have the opportunity to join the NAI’s global network of innovators striving toward a common goal.”

Elected NAI Senior Members will have access to the NAI’s premier mentorship platform, the Global Academic Inventor Network, exclusively available to NAI members. They will also have opportunities for networking and education through NAI-led panels, meetings, and committees, including the opportunity to publish in NAI’s Technology & Innovation journal.

“This program has been carefully constructed to welcome and honor a new cadre of academic inventors into our community,” said Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. “We look forward to recognizing young innovators and academically-minded individuals in the early stages of their innovation careers who aspire to reach new heights within the invention community.”

Nominations for the NAI Senior Member program opened today, and the organization will continue to accept nomination submissions on a rolling basis. Notices of election will be announced quarterly, with the inaugural class election slated for February 2019.

Eligible individuals should hold at minimum one issued U.S. patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office which has been licensed or commercialized. As an alternative, candidates may demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding five or more U.S. patents. All nominees must be affiliated with a Member Institution of the NAI.

For more information, visit the NAI website or contact Jacquie Burckley, Senior Member Coordinator, at [email protected].

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

United States Senate Resolution Recognizes the National Academy of Inventors

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 27, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has been officially recognized by the United States Senate through Senate Resolution 620, introduced as a bipartisan measure by Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri and affirmed unanimously by the full Senate on Aug. 28, 2018. 

The resolution recognizes the NAI and honors the organization’s milestone of achieving 200 member institutions.

In addition to acknowledging the NAI’s “rapid expansion,” the resolution affirms that the Senate “supports the mission of the National Academy of Inventors [and]…acknowledges the National Academy of Inventors for its role in elevating the contributions of academic inventors across all disciplines.”

“It is an honor to be recognized by the U.S. Senate for the NAI’s success in encouraging academic innovation in the United States and internationally,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “We greatly appreciate and thank Senators Nelson and Blunt for sponsoring this resolution and ensuring its swift passage.”

The NAI was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI partners closely with the USPTO in the pursuit of this mission.

“Through the doors of the USPTO walk inventors and entrepreneurs with innovations that will spur investment, create new jobs, grow our economy, and help us achieve our highest ideals,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. “Many of these will come from the National Academy of Inventors.”

The NAI now boasts more than 4,000 individual members and fellows spanning over 250 universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes.

“We are proud of the measurable impact that the NAI and our member institutions and individual inventor members and fellows are making throughout the world,” said Sanberg.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation.www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Three NAI Fellows Inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 11, 2018) – Dr. Emery Brown, Dr. Richard Houghten and Dr. Sudipta Seal, all Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame on September 7, 2018. Seven innovators were inducted during the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

Brown, Houghten and Seal join a number of NAI Fellows who have previously received this recognition, including NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg.

“It is a momentous feeling to see that nearly half of this year’s inductees to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame are NAI Fellows,” Sanberg said. “Dr. Brown, Dr. Houghten and Dr. Seal have made an incredible impact on the innovation landscape in Florida, and we are proud to support them as they receive this well-deserved honor.”

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates those inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the United States.

“It has been wonderful to see Florida embrace and elevate its own proud history of invention through the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. “Through this organization, Florida has rightly claimed its mantel as a leader in national innovation.”

Brown is Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of anesthesiology. He holds three issued U.S. patents.

Houghten founded the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and currently serves as CEO. His research has had significant impact on the pharmaceutical industry, and his innovative approach has revolutionized drug discovery across the nation. He holds 81 issued U.S. patents.

Seal is Trustee Chair, Pegasus and University Distinguished Professor at the University of Central Florida. His expertise in materials science and engineering led to groundbreaking discoveries and therapeutic applications of nano cerium oxide in regenerative nano-medicine. He holds 48 issued U.S. patents and his technology is licensed to multiple companies.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches Global Academic Inventor Network

The National Academy of Inventors aims to connect seasoned and world-renowned academic inventors with students and other junior professionals to aid them in advancing their innovative careers. 

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 5, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) today announced the launch of the Global Academic Inventors Network (GAIN). GAIN is an international mentoring platform exclusively available to academic inventors.

NAI President Paul R. Sanberg first announced the concept of a global network at the NAI’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April 2018.

“It is our hope that this network helps ease the process for emerging inventors as they take an initial idea through the entire discovery process and, then, licensing and commercializing that technology for the benefit of society,” Sanberg said.

GAIN is one of a number of initiatives that the NAI has announced in 2018. The platform is engineered to make it easy for inventive students and faculty to connect, while giving them the tools, automation and security to bring the global invention community together and drive innovation.

“The Global Academic Inventors Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration,” said Dr. Karen J.L. Burg, member of the NAI Board of Directors. “By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasoned inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

For a limited time, NAI Sustaining Member Institutions, Chapters and Fellows will receive exclusive priority access to join GAIN. Following the initial launch stage, the NAI will open the platform to the entire NAI community.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

The Invention Gender Gap

Special topic issue explores the gender gap between men and women in inventorship, analyzing its causes, evaluating current efforts to address it, and suggesting new ideas to eliminate this disparity 

Tampa, Fla. (Jul. 16, 2018) – Statistics show that women are named as inventors on less than one in five U.S. patents. Why does this gender disparity exist, and what is being done to address it? The new issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19:4) (full text) tackles these key questions, and the papers collected here serve as a primer on the state of the invention gender gap, why it persists, and what can be done to change it.

“There is perhaps no area more crucial to explore than the gender gap in invention,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and co-editor-in-chief of T&I. “The persistence of this problem cuts us off from leveraging the full innovative potential of half of our population, thus reducing our innovative output and making us less competitive as a nation. In addition to the many articles on the gender gap, we are also taking this opportunity to honor our women NAI Fellows, as are the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Science and Technology Medals Foundation with their respective women Inductees and Laureates.”

The full issue highlights can be found at the following link: https://academyofinventors.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue-Highlights-Aesthetic-Final.pdf

 

ARTICLES INCLUDED:

  • Feminist Challenge to Gene Patents
  • Gender Data Gap: Baseline of U.S. Academic Institutions
  • Engaging Women Innovators: Analytical Support For Women Innovator Programming in University Technology Transfer
  • Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Invention and Technology Commercialization
  • On the Commercialization Path: Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Outputs among Women in STEM
  • Closing Diversity Gaps in Innovation: Gender, Race, and Income Disparities in Patenting and Commercialization of Inventions
  • Addressing the Gender Gap among Patent Holders through Invention Education Policies
  • Breaking Barriers: Female Inventors Blazing a Path Forward
  • From the USPTO: Mind the Gap—The USPTO’s Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Patenting and Innovation
  • The NAI Fellow Profile: An Interview with Dr. Michelle Khine
  • Investing in Academic Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Moving Beyond Research Funding through the NSF I-CORPS® Program
  • On the Software Patenting Controversy
  • NAI Chapter Spotlight: University of Southern California
  • Innovation in Action: Arizona State University

 

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 Announced

Top University Patent Holders Revealed in Report Authored by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla. (June 5, 2018) – The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is used to compile the report, which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

Published annually since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, the report ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO during the 2017 calendar year. The full report can be found at: https://www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/top-100-universities-2017.pdf

“The institutions on this list are doing incredible work promoting academic innovation and incubating groundbreaking technologies which exemplify the importance of technology transfer to institutional success,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are proud to collaborate with the IPO for the sixth consecutive year and it is a privilege to showcase the vital contributions to society made by universities.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2017 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Texas System, Stanford University, Tsinghua University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Johns Hopkins University, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Harvard University and California Institute of Technology.

“University patents help to ignite a culture of growth and innovation which in turn stimulates local, regional, and global economies and generates funding for future research initiatives,” said Mark W. Lauroesch, IPO Executive Director. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents is a report which demonstrates the critical role universities play in patents, licensing and commercialization.”

IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2017 will be released for the 35th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2017 calendar year. For patents with one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected].

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions, and growing rapidly. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO
The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

 

RENOWNED RESEARCHERS, POLICYMAKERS, AND ACADEMIC LEADERS TO CONVERGE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. FOR 2018 NAI CONFERENCE

The Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 4-6

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Over 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Washington, D.C. on April 4-6 for the Seventh Annual Conference of the NAI. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Ronald M. Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies; David J. Skorton, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the City College of New York and president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will also include the NAI’s second annual Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s seventh annual conference is “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Intersection of Innovation and the Future, Intersection of Ideas and Entrepreneurship, and Intersection of Academia, Government, and Industry. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

“Our nation’s capital provides a fitting backdrop as we explore the intersections of academia, industry, and government in the innovation space,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The conference program engages with these wide-ranging facets of academic invention through timely panels and presentations, the induction of the newest class of NAI Fellows, and the Student Innovation Showcase. I look forward to three days of networking and learning with our attendees, while honoring the amazing accomplishments of our members.”

The NAI will induct the newest class of Fellows on April 5 at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“I am honored to join the NAI as the annual conference returns to Washington for another year of insightful programming,” Hirshfeld said. “The NAI has initiated an exciting dialogue on academic innovation that continues to gain momentum. I look forward to recognizing the next class of NAI Fellows and their substantial contributions in academic discovery and innovation which improve our quality of life and influence the next generation of thought leaders.”

Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs. In addition, over $137 billion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries. Among all NAI Fellows there are over 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, more than 440 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 37 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, and 29 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

The meeting will conclude with NAI’s Student Innovation Showcase. The showcase, in its second year, offers a unique platform for students to demonstrate world-changing inventions to the highest caliber of innovators. Six interdisciplinary student teams from prestigious research universities, including The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, University of South Florida, University of Southern California, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Worcester Polytechnic University have been invited to exhibit their inventions to a panel of prolific inventors.

“As both an inventor and administrator, I cannot overemphasize the importance of fostering young inventors throughout their academic trajectories,” said Helena Wisniewski, vice provost for research & graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NAI Fellow, and Student Innovation Showcase judge. “I am delighted to see the NAI continue to engage its network of prominent academic inventors to support the next generation of innovators, and I look forward to serving as a judge for the Student Innovation Showcase.”

A detailed agenda is available at https://www.academyofinventors.org/conference/docs/2018-nai-conference-preliminary-agenda.pdf. Invited papers from the conference will be published in the NAI journal Technology and Innovation. To learn more about Technology and Innovation, visit https://www.academyofinventors.org/ti/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. Learn more at www.academyofinventors.org.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2017 FELLOWS

155 academic inventors honored with esteemed distinction

TAMPA, Fla., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 155 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“Congratulations to the exceptional academic inventors who comprise the 2017 class of NAI Fellows,” said Shirley Malcom, Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It was my privilege to support the important mission of the NAI as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee. The NAI Fellows Program plays a vital role in bringing to the forefront the essential scientific and economic contributions of our nation’s inventors.”

On 5 Apr. 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference in Washington, DC. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Commissioner for Patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“Once again, I am in awe of the inventors elected as NAI Fellows. It was my honor to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and participate in this unique recognition of impactful patented contributions to science and technology,” Hirshfeld said, “I look forward to celebrating this remarkable group at the 2018 NAI Conference at the Smithsonian American Art Museum which was once known as the Temple of Invention during its years as the first dedicated home of the U.S. Patent Office. This historic national landmark serves as an extremely fitting location to once again showcase inventors and their technologies.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention—their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

The 2017 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full-page announcement in the 19 Jan. 2018 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Science and Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors.

2017 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Samuel I. Achilefu, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dereje Agonafer, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Mark G. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Hiroshi Amano, Nagoya University
  • Richard R. Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Leif Andersson, Texas A&M University and Uppsala University
  • J. Roger P. Angel, The University of Arizona
  • Diran Apelian, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Plamen B. Atanassov, The University of New Mexico
  • Craig H. Benson, University of Virginia
  • Cory J. Berkland, The University of Kansas
  • Vijayakumar Bhagavatula, Carnegie Mellon University
  • David J. Bishop, Boston University
  • Donald L. Bitzer, North Carolina State University
  • Randy D. Blakely, Florida Atlantic University
  • Helen M. Blau, Stanford University
  • Timothy M. Block, Baruch S. Blumberg Institute
  • Daniel J. Blumenthal, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Susmita Bose, Washington State University
  • Steven T. Boyce, University of Cincinnati
  • Edward S. Boyden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Anthony B. Brennan, University of Florida
  • Carrie L. Byington, Texas A&M University
  • Marvin H. Caruthers, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Dennis S. Charney, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky
  • Yet Ming Chiang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joanne Chory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mooi Choo Chuah, Lehigh University
  • David E. Clemmer, Indiana University
  • Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University
  • Stanley N. Cohen, Stanford University
  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Pieter Cullis, The University of British Columbia
  • Mari Dezawa, Tohoku University
  • William L. Ditto, North Carolina State University
  • Prabir K. Dutta, The Ohio State University
  • Jack A. Elias, Brown University
  • Zhigang Z. Fang, The University of Utah
  • Tim A. Fischell, Michigan State University and Western Michigan University
  • Paul B. Fisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Edward P. Furlani, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Guangping Gao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University
  • Bruce E. Gnade, Southern Methodist University
  • Lawrence Gold, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sheila A. Grant, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Mark A. Griswold, Case Western Reserve University
  • Horng-Jyh Harn, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital
  • Robert W. Heath, Jr., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Walter Brown Herbst, Northwestern University
  • Mark C. Hersam, Northwestern University
  • David M. Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ming Hsieh, University of Southern California
  • Ian W. Hunter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Mikko Hupa, Åbo Akademi University
  • Oliver C. Ibe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  • Eric D. Isaacs, The University of Chicago
  • Subramanian S. Iyer, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Joseph A. Izatt, Duke University
  • William R. Jacobs, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University
  • Stephen Albert Johnston, Arizona State University
  • Ranu Jung, Florida International University
  • Brian L. Justus, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
  • Alexander V. Kabanov, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aravinda Kar, University of Central Florida
  • Kazunori Kataoka, The University of Tokyo
  • Howard E. Katz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Arie E. Kaufman, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Donald B. Keck, University of South Florida
  • Jeffery W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute
  • David V. Kerns, Jr., Olin College of Engineering
  • Robert S. Keynton, University of Louisville
  • Dennis K. Killinger, University of South Florida
  • Kwang J. Kim, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Wayne H. Knox, University of Rochester
  • Philip T. Kortum, Rice University
  • Philip T. Krein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • John J. La Scala, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Jonathan J. Langberg, Emory University
  • Sang Yup Lee, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Fred C. Lee, Virginia Tech
  • Eric C. Leuthardt, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology
  • Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California, Berkeley
  • Chih-Yuan Lu, National Taiwan University
  • Zhenqiang Ma, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michele Marcolongo, Drexel University
  • Laura Marcu, University of California, Davis
  • R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University
  • Gary S. Margules, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mary Helen McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Kishor C. Mehta, Texas Tech University
  • Deirdre R. Meldrum, Arizona State University
  • Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
  • Gregory Moller, University of Idaho
  • Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., University of Maryland
  • Shouleh Nikzad, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • John R. Nottingham, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic
  • Mariappan P. Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Christopher R. Parish, The Australian National University
  • Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dennis W. Prather, University of Delaware
  • Paul R. Prucnal, Princeton University
  • Nirmala Ramanujam, Duke University
  • Jennifer L. Rexford, Princeton University
  • Kenner C. Rice, National Institutes of Health
  • Camillo Ricordi, University of Miami
  • Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Bruce R. Rosen, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Barbara O. Rothbaum, Emory University
  • Jonathan M. Rothberg, Yale University
  • Max F. Rothschild, Iowa State University
  • Clinton T. Rubin, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Henry Samueli, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine
  • Ulrich S. Schubert, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
  • Paul A. Seib, Kansas State University
  • Terrence J. Sejnowski, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mohammad Shahidehpour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Yun-Qing Shi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Subhash L. Shinde, University of Notre Dame
  • Richard W. Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Krishna P. Singh, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hyongsok T. Soh, Stanford University
  • Steven L. Stice, University of Georgia
  • Steven L. Suib, University of Connecticut
  • Russell H. Taylor, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jeffrey A. Toretsky, Georgetown University
  • Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh and The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Robert Vince, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew J. Viterbi, University of Southern California
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, Duke University
  • Scott A. Waldman, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Thomas A. Waldmann, National Cancer Institute
  • Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Fei Wang, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Scott C. Weaver, The University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Thomas J. Webster, Northeastern University
  • Chin-Long Wey, National Chiao Tung University
  • Lorne Whitehead, The University of British Columbia
  • Cheryl L. Willman, The University of New Mexico
  • Alan N. Willson, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Teresa K. Woodruff, Northwestern University
  • Amy E. Wright, Florida Atlantic University
  • Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley
  • Paul Yager, University of Washington
  • Jackie Y. Ying, Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Bin Yu, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
  • Mona E. Zaghloul, The George Washington University
  • Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University
  • Lynn Zechiedrich, Baylor College of Medicine

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. UTILITY PATENTS FOR 2016 ANNOUNCED

Top University Patent Holders Unveiled in Report by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 has been announced by The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data is obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to compile the report which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report, which has been published each year since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, collects the rankings by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report can be found at: www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes, products and treatments which provide significant societal benefit as well as generate job creation that sustains and helps grow our local, regional and global economy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “It is an honor to recognize the top patent holders through this report in collaboration with IPO for the fifth consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2016 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, California Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, The University of Texas System, University of Michigan, and Columbia University.

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NAI CONFERENCE TO BRING WORLD RENOWNED ACADEMIC INVENTORS AND ASPIRING INNOVATORS TO BOSTON

The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 5-7

BOSTON, April 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Nearly 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Boston April 5-7 for the Sixth Annual Conference. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, IBM’s most prolific female inventor, and H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The meeting also will include the NAI’s inaugural Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s sixth annual conference is “Recognizing Pillars of Academic Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Changing the Academic Innovation Landscape, Issues Relating to Public Policy and Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Drive the Future of Innovation. Presenters include academic luminaries among the NAI’s members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

The NAI will induct the newly elected Fellows on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“It is an honor to once again participate in the NAI’s Annual Conference and the induction of some of our nation’s most esteemed academic inventors,” Hirshfeld said. “It is extremely gratifying to watch the NAI grow into one of the leading organizations that promotes invention by emphasizing the role of patents. I look forward to honoring the newest class of NAI Fellows and their vital contributions to society.”

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NAI FELLOWS AMONG FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Four NAI Fellows Recognized for Innovative Contributions to State of Florida

TAMPA, Fla. – Four National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows are among the eight inventors elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the nation.

NAI Fellows elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame include:

Issa Batarseh, director of the Energy System Integration Division at the Florida Power Electronics Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Central Florida, was elected for innovative research which led to the creation of the first compact single solar photovoltaic (PV) panel.

Kenneth M. Ford, co-founder and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, was elected for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence and human-centered computing.

Richard D. Gitlin, State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida, was elected for his inventive research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems.

T. Dwayne McCay, president and CEO of the Florida Institute of Technology, is being inducted along with his wife, Mary Helen McCay, for their novel approaches to laser induced surface improvements.

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame was recognized by the Florida Senate in 2014 with a resolution sponsored by Senator Jeff Brandes that commended the Hall of Fame “for its commitment to honoring inventors and celebrating innovation, discovery, and excellence.” The Hall of Fame is located at the University of South Florida in Tampa and supported, in part, by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The newly elected Hall of Fame innovators be inducted at the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame 4th Annual Induction Ceremony & Gala on Sep. 8, 2017, at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

A complete list of Florida Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, including biographical information, is available here: www.FloridaInvents.org.

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BILL INTRODUCED TO GRANT FEDERAL CHARTER TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS

Congressman Dennis Ross Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Recognize the NAI’s Role in Advancing Academic Innovation

TAMPA, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – U.S. Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-FL-15) has introduced H.R. 976, a bill to grant federal charter to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). This bipartisan legislation would recognize the importance of the NAI’s mission of advancing a culture where academic invention and innovation is celebrated for its role in fueling our nation’s economy.

The NAI is a non-profit member organization comprised of more than 240 U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with more than 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows.

H.R. 976 would provide an honorific designation symbolizing the significance of the NAI’s mission, goals and objectives in benefiting the public. The charter would also allow NAI members to be called upon as advisors by any department of the government. NAI members are contributors to fields including medicine, cybersecurity, veteran’s research, and engineering among many others.

The NAI Fellows Program has 757 Fellows worldwide representing more than 229 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in July 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with more than $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“NAI members among our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies and translating them into innovative products, processes, cures, and treatments, for the betterment of society,” Ross said, “I am proud to introduce this important bill to help further the mission of the NAI and allow their members to serve our government as subject matter experts on innovation, intellectual property, translational research and commercialization.”

The NAI is seeking additional support for this bill which currently has two original co-sponsors including: Daniel Lipinski [IL-3] and Rep. Kathy Castor [FL-14].

“We are very grateful to Congressman Ross and the supporting co-sponsors for introducing this important charter bill which recognizes the vital role academic innovation plays in moving our nation forward,” said Paul R. Sanberg, the NAI’s founder and president and the Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation & Economic Development at the University of South Florida.

“For generations, America’s academic inventors have been at the forefront of modernizing every aspect of our lives and keeping our nation economically strong and competitive. A federal charter for the National Academy of Inventors serves the public good in supporting intellectual property, translational research and commercialization. We are honored to be considered for this recognition and to continue the NAI’s work in supporting and advancing the cause of innovation and invention.”

For more information on how to encourage your congressional delegation to support this initiative, please contact Keara Leach at 813-974-5862, [email protected].

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2016 FELLOWS

Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 94 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 376 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 28 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 45 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 28 Nobel Laureates, 216 AAAS Fellows, 126 IEEE Fellows, and 116 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in Jul. 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with over $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

On 6 Apr. 2017, the 2016 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Andrew H. Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“I look forward to welcoming and honoring the 2016 class of Fellows to Boston in April,” said Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering at Northeastern University and NAI Fellow. “The NAI has once again unveiled a prolific group of academic inventors who produce vitally important discoveries for the betterment of society.”

“With each year I continue to be amazed by the caliber of individuals named as NAI Fellows and the 2016 class is no exception,” said U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld. “Congratulations to this very deserving group of distinguished academic innovators. I was honored to once again serve as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee and look forward to recognizing this new group of innovative leaders at the induction ceremony this spring.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to innovation in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 Jan. 2017 issue, and in upcoming issues of Inventors Digest and NAI journal Technology and Innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows were evaluated by the 2016 Selection Committee included 19 members, comprising NAI Fellows, recipients of U.S. National Medals, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“It is exciting to see the NAI Fellows Program continue to grow and honor the world’s most impactful academic inventors each year,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The 2016 Fellows exude innovative excellence and we feel truly privileged to welcome them to the Academy and recognize their remarkable contributions to discovery and invention.”

2016 Elected NAI Fellows

  • David Akopian, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kamal S. Ali, Jackson State University
  • A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carl R. Alving, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Hamid Arastoopour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Arsenault, Tufts University
  • B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University
  • Zhenan Bao, Stanford University
  • Richard G. Baraniuk, Rice University
  • Francis Barany, Cornell University
  • Jean-Marie Basset, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Paula J. Bates, University of Louisville
  • Craig C. Beeson, Medical University of South Carolina
  • K. Darrell Berlin, Oklahoma State University
  • Sarit B. Bhaduri, The University of Toledo
  • Pallab K. Bhattacharya, University of Michigan
  • Dieter H. Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • Christopher N. Bowman, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Barbara D. Boyan, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Mindy M. Brashears, Texas Tech University
  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ruben G. Carbonell, North Carolina State University
  • John F. Carpenter, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Raghunath V. Chaudhari, The University of Kansas
  • Liang-Gee Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Simon R. Cherry, University of California, Davis
  • Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Adrienne E. Clarke, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Rita R. Colwell, University of Maryland
  • Diane J. Cook, Washington State University
  • Peter A. Crooks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Riccardo Dalla-Favera, Columbia University
  • Suman Datta, University of Notre Dame
  • Delbert E. Day, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roger A. de la Torre, University of Missouri
  • Stephen W. Director, Northeastern University
  • Jeffrey L. Duerk, Case Western Reserve University
  • James L. Dye, Michigan State University
  • Richard L. Ehman, Mayo Clinic
  • Gary A. Eiceman, New Mexico State University
  • Ali Emadi, McMaster University, Canada
  • Ronald M. Evans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Stanley Falkow, Stanford University
  • Hany Farid, Dartmouth College
  • Shane M. Farritor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Philippe M. Fauchet, Vanderbilt University
  • Denise L. Faustman, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • David R. Fischell, Cornell University
  • Vincent A. Fischetti, The Rockefeller University
  • David P. Fries, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Kenneth G. Furton, Florida International University
  • Kanad Ghose, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Juan E. Gilbert, University of Florida
  • Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco
  • Herbert Gleiter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Dan M. Goebel, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Forouzan Golshani, California State University, Long Beach
  • Lorne M. Golub, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • John B. Goodenough, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael Graetzel, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Robert J. Greenberg, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research
  • Richard M. Greenwald, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick G. Halbur, Iowa State University
  • Henry R. Halperin, Johns Hopkins University
  • Amy E. Herr, University of California, Berkeley
  • D. Craig Hooper, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Edward A. Hoover, Colorado State University
  • Oliver Yoa-Pu Hu, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan
  • David Huang, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Mark S. Humayun, University of Southern California
  • Joseph P. Iannotti, Cleveland Clinic
  • Enrique Iglesia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sungho Jin, University of California, San Diego
  • Barry W. Johnson, University of Virginia
  • William L. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • John L. Junkins, Texas A&M University
  • Michelle Khine, University of California, Irvine
  • John Klier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Thomas J. Kodadek, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Harold L. Kohn, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Steven M. Kuznicki, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Enrique J. Lavernia, University of California, Irvine
  • Nicholas J. Lawrence, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Leslie A. Leinwand, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Frances S. Ligler, North Carolina State University
  • Yilu Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jennifer K. Lodge, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Mandi J. Lopez, Louisiana State University
  • Gabriel P. López, The University of New Mexico
  • Surya K. Mallapragada, Iowa State University
  • Seth R. Marder, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University
  • Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation-India
  • Kouki Matsuse, Meiji University, Japan
  • Martin M. Matzuk, Baylor University
  • T. Dwayne McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • James W. McGinity, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Thomas J. Meade, Northwestern University
  • Katrina L. Mealey, Washington State University
  • Edward W. Merrill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Paul L. Modrich, Duke University
  • David J. Mooney, Harvard University
  • H. Keith Moo-Young, Washington State University Tri-Cities
  • Israel J. Morejon, University of South Florida
  • Harold L. Moses, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph R. Moskal, Northwestern University
  • Nazim Z. Muradov, University of Central Florida
  • Nicholas Muzyczka, University of Florida
  • Lakshmi S. Nair, University of Connecticut
  • Shrikanth S. Narayanan, University of Southern California
  • Ellen Ochoa, NASA Johnson Space Center
  • Erin K. O’Shea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Francis A. Papay, Cleveland Clinic
  • Kevin J. Parker, University of Rochester
  • Yvonne J. Paterson, University of Pennsylvania
  • George N. Pavlakis, National Institutes of Health
  • Kenneth H. Perlin, New York University
  • Nasser Peyghambarian, The University of Arizona
  • Gary A. Piazza, University of South Alabama
  • Christophe Pierre, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Michael C. Pirrung, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael V. Pishko, University of Wyoming
  • Garth Powis, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Paras N. Prasad, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ronald T. Raines, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Michael P. Rastatter, East Carolina University
  • Jacob Richter, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Richard E. Riman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Andrew G. Rinzler, University of Florida
  • Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University
  • Nabeel A. Riza, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Kenneth J. Rothschild, Boston University
  • Stuart H. Rubin, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center
  • Linda J. Saif, The Ohio State University
  • Sudeep Sarkar, University of South Florida
  • John T. Schiller, National Institutes of Health
  • Diane G. Schmidt, University of Cincinnati
  • Wayne S. Seames, University of North Dakota
  • Michael S. Shur, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University
  • Mrityunjay Singh, Ohio Aerospace Institute
  • Kamalesh K. Sirkar, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • David R. Smith, Duke University
  • James E. Smith, West Virginia University
  • Terrance P. Snutch, The University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University
  • Gerald Sonnenfeld, The University of Rhode Island
  • James S. Speck, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Bruce W. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman University
  • Kenneth S. Suslick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark J. Suto, Southern Research Institute
  • Yu-Chong Tai, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Tansu, Lehigh University
  • Fleur T. Tehrani, California State University, Fullerton
  • Marc T. Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford University
  • Madhukar (Mathew) L. Thakur, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Mehmet Toner, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan T. Vilcek, New York University
  • Anil V. Virkar, The University of Utah
  • John F. Wager, Oregon State University
  • William R. Wagner, University of Pittsburgh
  • Isiah M. Warner, Louisiana State University
  • John D. Weete, Auburn University
  • Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University
  • Ralph Weissleder, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas M. Weller, University of South Florida
  • Jennifer L. West, Duke University
  • Amnon Yariv, California Institute of Technology
  • Yun Yen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Warren M. Zapol, Massachusetts General Hospital

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS FOR 2015 ANNOUNCED

NAI and IPO Release Report on Top University Patent Holders for Fourth Time

TAMPA, Fla. (Jul. 12, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2015. The report utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent.

“The rate at which our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies is growing faster than ever and it is an honor to recognize these institutions for their amazing work,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We thank the IPO for collaborating with the NAI for the fourth year in a row on this ranking which confirms the importance of supporting research and innovation within academia.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, The University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan.

“IPO is proud to once again release this important report with the NAI to highlight the tremendous work in patents being done at universities,” said IPO Executive Director, Mark W. Lauroesch. “Inventive ecosystems continue to grow around universities, sparking a culture in which academics and innovation go hand-in-hand producing technologies which stimulate not only local and regional economies but the global economy.”

IPO’s 33rd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2015 was also recently released. The top 10 universities on the 2015 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2015 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS SIGN MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH US PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

NAI and USPTO officials signed agreement during NAI’s Fifth Annual Conference

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (April 26, 2016) – Russell Slifer, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and deputy director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), signed a Memorandum of Agreement during the NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, the closing event for the NAI’s fifth annual conference on April 15, 2016.

The agreement outlines the opportunity for the USPTO and the NAI to work closely on mutually beneficial projects to enrich education outreach, honors and awards, and programs relating to intellectual property. The agreement includes a commitment from the NAI to host its annual meeting every other year at USPTO headquarters.

“It has been our pleasure at the USPTO, for the last five years to have a relationship with the Academy and it is my pleasure also to sign our Memorandum of Agreement,” said Slifer. “We will continue to cooperate to host events and awards. The NAI annual meeting will continue to be held here every other year, which will allow for our employees to meet with NAI members and Fellows to discuss how the work they are doing comes together to help the nation and innovators around the world.”

David Kappos, former Under Secretary of Commerce and previous director of the USPTO, embraced the NAI soon after it was founded in 2010 and suggested the need for a higher level program for leading academic inventors to be honored and recognized for their contributions to society.

In his speech at the 2012 NAI annual meeting in Tampa, Kappos said, “The NAI is a breakthrough for our country. It couldn’t be more timely to have an organization like this to be championing innovation.”

“We are very grateful that the USPTO has provided vital support to the NAI since our inception,” said Sanberg. “We are pleased to announce the signing of this Memorandum of Agreement which solidifies our important friendship and we look forward to a bright future of collaborations.”

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FELLOWS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS INDUCTED AT UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

2015 keynote speech provided by U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) – U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld provided the keynote address for the induction ceremony of the 2015 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors at the NAI’s fifth annual conference, held this year in Washington D.C. on Apr. 14-15.

Over 325 inventors and academic leaders attended the conference, which featured presentations and panels by more than 30 distinguished scientists and innovators including keynote addresses by Victor J. Dzau, President of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow; Cristin A. Dorgelo, Chief of Staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; and Emery N. Brown, MIT Professor and NAI Fellow.

“It was an honor to participate in the NAI’s fifth annual meeting as a featured speaker,” said Brown. “The NAI fills a vital need by bringing together innovators from across disciplines to be recognized for their groundbreaking contributions in research, patents and commercialization. I am honored to be a Fellow of this important national organization.”

At the ceremony held on Apr. 15 at the USPTO, Hirshfeld and Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI and Charter Fellow, presented the 2015 class of Fellows with a trophy, medal and rosette pin honoring their contributions as academic inventors. Of the 168 innovators elected to the 2015 class, more than 130 were in attendance.

“I am personally inspired and grateful to be amongst this distinguished group and join in recognizing you today,” said Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, during his keynote address. “You have truly enhanced the quality of life for our nation and we thank you for your innovative contributions. As inventive researchers who are leaders in all fields of academia, we are eager to learn from your expertise and collaborate on future educational initiatives.”

The NAI Fellows Program has 582 Fellows worldwide representing more than 190 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 20,000 issued U.S. patents.

The collective NAI Fellows now include more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the three branches of the National Academy of Sciences, 27 Nobel Laureates, 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 36 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 14 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows among other awards and distinctions.

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors,” said Illinois Institute of Technology President Alan W. Cramb. “Being named in the same category as other globally distinguished innovators and inventors in the NAI is a privilege.”

Nominations for 2016 Fellows will open Jul. 1 and can be submitted online through Oct. 1 at AcademyofInventors.org. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted and honored at the 2017 NAI Annual Conference, to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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U.S. COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE PRESIDENT SPEAK AT NAI CONFERENCE

The 5th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 14-15 in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 11, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors will celebrate its fifth annual conference by returning to Washington, D.C., Apr. 14-15, 2016. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents and Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow.

The theme of the NAI’s fifth conference is “Building on Foundations of Innovation” to explore the interaction between the United States’ history of change and the modern culture and leadership of innovation.

Keynote speeches by Cristin Dorgelo, chief of staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Emery Brown, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NAI Fellow, along with presentations and panels on innovation by more than 35 prolific scientists and academic leaders, round out the conference program.

Highlights also include a signature gala at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the induction of the 2015 Fellows of the NAI—the conference’s closing event—at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, with a keynote address by Hirshfeld.

“It is a pleasure to commemorate the Academy’s milestone fifth annual meeting by welcoming the NAI back to Washington,” said Hirshfeld. “I look forward to recognizing the new distinguished class of NAI Fellows. These true champions of academic invention have made tremendous contributions to society through their amazing innovations.”

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2015 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators honored with prestigious distinction

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 leaders of invention and innovation to Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing over 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2015 Fellows account for 5,368 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, NAM), 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 32 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 27 Nobel Laureates, 14 Lemelson-MIT Prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on 15 Apr. 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

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2015 Elected NAI Fellows

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dean P. Alderucci, The University of Chicago
  • Jayakrishna Ambati, University of Kentucky
  • Iver E. Anderson, Iowa State University
  • Kristi S. Anseth, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Allen W. Apblett, Oklahoma State University
  • Charles J. Arntzen, Arizona State University
  • Harry A. Atwater, Jr., California Inst. of Technology
  • Lorne A. Babiuk, University of Alberta
  • John M. Ballato, Clemson University
  • John S. Baras, University of Maryland
  • Issa Batarseh, University of Central Florida
  • Ray H. Baughman, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Angela M. Belcher, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Stephen J. Benkovic, The Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Shekhar Bhansali, Florida International University
  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • John D. Birdwell, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Kenneth J. Blank, Rowan University
  • Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University
  • John E. Bowers, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gary L. Bowlin, University of Memphis
  • C. Jeffrey Brinker, The University of New Mexico
  • Richard B. Brown, The University of Utah
  • Emery N. Brown, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Milton L. Brown, Georgetown University
  • Steven R.J. Brueck, The University of New Mexico
  • Joe C. Campbell, University of Virginia
  • Selim A. Chacour, University of South Florida
  • Mau-Chung Frank Chang, Nat. Chiao Tung Univ.
  • Shu Chien, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Diana S. Chow, University of Houston
  • Chung K. (David) Chu, University of Georgia
  • Yoginder P. Chugh, Southern Illinois University
  • William J. Clancey, IHMC
  • Katrina Cornish, The Ohio State University
  • Delos M. (Toby) Cosgrove III, Cleveland Clinic
  • Alan W. Cramb, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Benjamin F. Cravatt III, The Scripps Research Inst.
  • Roy Curtiss III, University of Florida
  • Paul D. Dapkus, University of Southern California
  • John G. Daugman, University of Cambridge
  • Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology
  • Robert C. Dean, Jr., Dartmouth College
  • Atam P. Dhawan, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Duane B. Dimos, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • David M. Eddy, University of South Florida
  • Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania
  • Antonio Facchetti, Northwestern University
  • Rudolf Faust, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland
  • Christodoulos A. Floudas, Texas A&M University
  • Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri
  • Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
  • Jean M.J. Fréchet, KAUST
  • Richard H. Frenkiel, Rutgers University
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Stanford University
  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, University of Missouri
  • Sir Andre K. Geim, The University of Manchester
  • George Georgiou, The University of Texas at Austin
  • John C. Gore, Vanderbilt University
  • Venu Govindaraju, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ali Hajimiri, California Inst. of Technology
  • Naomi J. Halas, Rice University
  • Andrew D. Hamilton, University of Oxford
  • Wayne W. Hanna, University of Georgia
  • Florence P. Haseltine, National Institutes of Health
  • Charlotte A.E. Hauser, KAUST
  • Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • M. Frederick Hawthorne, University of Missouri
  • Barton F. Haynes, Duke University
  • Richard F. Heck, University of Delaware
  • Andrew B. Holmes, The University of Melbourne
  • Rush D. Holt, AAAS
  • H. Robert Horvitz, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Chenming C. Hu, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Leon D. Iasemidis, Louisiana Tech University
  • Mir Imran, University of Pittsburgh
  • Donald E. Ingber, Harvard University
  • Chennupati Jagadish, The Australian National Univ.
  • Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University
  • Kristina M. Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Joseph S. Kalinowski, East Carolina University
  • Aaron V. Kaplan, Dartmouth College
  • Usha N. Kasid, Georgetown University
  • Kenneth W. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University
  • Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University
  • Steven J. Kubisen, The George Washington Univ.
  • Donald W. Landry, Columbia University
  • Se-Jin Lee, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sunggyu Lee, Ohio University
  • Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke University
  • G. Douglas Letson, Moffitt Cancer & Research Inst.
  • Jennifer A. Lewis, Harvard University
  • Guifang Li, University of Central Florida
  • James C. Liao, Univ. of California, Los Angeles
  • John S. (Pete) Lollar III, Emory University
  • Anthony M. Lowman, Rowan University
  • Rodney S. Markin, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University
  • Dean F. Martin, University of South Florida
  • Helen S. Mayberg, Emory University
  • Patrick L. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Edith G. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center
  • Thomas E. Milner, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Umesh K. Mishra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Somenath Mitra, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Andreas F. Molisch, University of Southern California
  • Ramani Narayan, Michigan State University
  • Alan C. Nelson, Arizona State University
  • Kyriacos C. Nicolaou, Rice University
  • David R. Nygren, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • Richard M. Osgood, Jr., Columbia University
  • Alyssa Panitch, Purdue University
  • Heloise A. Pereira, OUHSC
  • William M. Pierce, Jr., University of Louisville
  • John M. Poate, Colorado School of Mines
  • H. Vincent, Poor, Princeton University
  • Ann Progulske-Fox, University of Florida
  • Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington
  • Kaushik Rajashekara, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas
  • Jahangir S. Rastegar, Stony Brook University
  • A. Hari Reddi, Univ. of California, Davis
  • E. Albert Reece, University of Maryland
  • Kenneth L. Reifsnider, The Univ. of TX at Arlington
  • Jasper D. Rine, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Ajeet Rohatgi, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Stephen D. Russell, SPAWAR
  • Michael J. Sailor, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Bahgat G. Sammakia, Binghamton University
  • Andrew V. Schally, University of Miami
  • Paul R. Schimmel, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Peter G. Schultz, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University
  • Jonathan L. Sessler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Mohsen Shahinpour, University of Maine
  • Benjamin A. Shneiderman, University of Maryland
  • Marvin J. Slepian, The University of Arizona
  • Kwok-Fai So, The University of Hong Kong
  • Richard A. Soref, Univ. of Massachusetts Boston
  • Pramod K. Srivastava, University of Connecticut
  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati
  • Valentino J. Stella, The University of Kansas
  • Galen D. Stucky, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bala Subramaniam, The University of Kansas
  • R. Michael Tanner, APLU
  • Guillermo J. Tearney, Harvard University
  • Stephen Tomlinson, Medical Univ. of South Carolina
  • James M. Tour, Rice University
  • Kalliat T. Valsaraj, Louisiana State University
  • Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Purdue University
  • Norman J. Wagner III, University of Delaware
  • Yong Wang, Washington State University
  • James A. Wells, Univ. of California, San Francisco
  • Jay F. Whitacre, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caroline C. Whitacre, The Ohio State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, Univ. of Alaska Anchorage
  • Edward D. Wolf, Cornell University
  • Paul K. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • James C. Wyant, The University of Arizona
  • Pan-Chyr Yang, National Taiwan University
  • Yu-Dong Yao, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Martin L. Yarmush, Rutgers University
  • Jim P. Zheng, Florida State University

NAI AND IPO RELEASE TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (June 16, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

“The NAI is delighted to be releasing this list of the leading innovative universities in the world in conjunction with the IPO for the third year in a row,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “The data once again proves that innovation based on university technology continues to be a key factor in economic development and a fundamental element to the success of a university.”

In conjunction, the IPO will soon be releasing their 32nd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations worldwide that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2014. The top 13 universities on the 2014 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2014 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

“Patents make enormous contributions to U.S innovation, leading to more jobs in U.S. industry and new strength in the economy,” said IPO Executive Director Herbert C. Wamsley. “These innovations help solidify the transfer of cutting-edge research to the marketplace, producing revenue and potentially increasing research funding by providing corporations and businesses the incentive to invest in university projects.”

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2014 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research, or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected]

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2014 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators elected to high honor

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 16, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 170 distinguished innovators to NAI Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 414, representing more than 150 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions.

Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leadership of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 208 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, IOM), 21 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 16 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, 10 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Science, 21 Nobel Laureates, 11 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 112 AAAS Fellows, and 62 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Collectively, the 414 NAI Fellows hold nearly 14,000 U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on Mar. 20, 2015, as part of the 4th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Deputy Commissioner for Patent Operations Andrew Faile will be providing the keynote address for the induction ceremony. Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, newly designed medal, and rosette pin in honor of their outstanding accomplishments.

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NAI MEMBER INSTITUTIONS DOMINATE NSF I-CORPS TEAM AWARDS

Eight of the top 12 universities nationally are NAI members

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 25, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors today recognized NAI Member Institutions with teams selected in 2014 for the Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Team program by the National Science Foundation. The 82 teams from NAI member universities comprise 54 percent of all teams nationwide receiving I-Corps Team awards this year.

Among the top 12 universities receiving the awards, eight are from NAI member universities, including, at #1, University of Michigan with 13 teams; #3, University of South Florida with five teams; #4, Carnegie-Mellon University with four teams; and tied for #5 with three teams each, Arizona State University, Florida State University, Lehigh University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nationally, 153 teams from 91 universities were selected for I-Corps Team awards in 2014. Each team receives a $50,000 grant and participates in an I-Corps Teams curriculum designed to provide hands-on, immersive learning for researchers on what it takes to successfully transition research out of the laboratory into commercially feasible products that benefit society.

“We are proud our Member Institutions are leading the way in this groundbreaking program.” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors and a AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador. “Their work contributes to economic prosperity in their communities, states and our nation.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) established the I-Corps Teams program to identify NSF-funded researchers, and provide them mentoring and funding in order to accelerate the translation of knowledge derived from fundamental research into emerging products and services.

“This is a powerful economic development initiative by the NSF,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development at Arizona State University, one of the top 12 universities receiving awards this year. “The I-Corps Team program is designed to create a national innovation ecology and will have a high impact.”

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NAI member institutions receiving NSI I-Corps Team Awards in 2014

Arizona State University

Auburn University

Boise State University

Carnegie-Mellon University

Colorado State University

Columbia University

Cornell University

Drexel University

Florida International University

Florida State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana Tech University

Missouri University of Science and Technology

New Mexico State University

New York University

Ohio State University

Oklahoma State University

Purdue University

Rutgers University New Brunswick

Stevens Institute of Technology

SUNY at Buffalo

SUNY at Stony Brook

Temple University

Texas Tech University

University of Akron

University of Arizona

University of California-Berkeley

University of California-Davis

University of Cincinnati Main Campus

University of Florida

University of Georgia Research Foundation Inc

University of Houston

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky Research Foundation

University of Maryland College Park

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Michigan Ann Arbor

University of North Texas

University of South Carolina at Columbia

University of South Florida

University of Toledo

University of Wisconsin-Madison

WHY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BRINGS UNIVERSITIES
‘MORE THAN MONEY’

Many benefits of tech transfer to universities beyond revenues from licenses & royalties

TAMPA, Fla. (June 26, 2014) – Academic technology transfer – the process of moving research from the lab to the market – provides intrinsic benefits to universities that go far beyond any potential revenues from licenses and royalties.

So say the authors, from five universities across the country and the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), in a new article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) that appears in the current issue of Technology and Innovation and is available Open Access.

“More than Money: The Exponential Impact of Academic Technology Transfer” is the work of lead author Valerie Landrio McDevitt, former associate vice president at the University of South Florida (USF) and current executive director of AUTM, and co-authors, Joelle Mendez-Hinds of USF, David Winwood of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Vinit Nijhawan of Boston University (BU), Todd Sherer of Emory University, John F. Ritter of Princeton University, and Paul R. Sanberg of USF and the NAI. USF, UAB, BU and Emory are all Charter Member Institutions of the NAI.

According to the authors, the positive benefits of technology transfer for universities can be significant, including: a vibrant culture of entrepreneurship that promotes recruitment and retention of faculty, increased student success through participation in real world research, public benefits from applied research that seeks to address global challenges, economic development, increased opportunities for funding through inter-institutional and interdisciplinary grants, new start-ups and international research relationships, and increased prestige and fundraising from a stronger university brand.

“In the academic setting, technology transfer is a critical component for facilitating and sparking innovation within universities and helping to connect universities with commercial partners in the community,” says co-author Paul R. Sanberg, who is founder and president of the NAI. “Technology transfer can be truly transformational to a university and to the community.”

The authors:

Valerie Landrio McDevitt, a registered patent attorney, is executive director of the Association of University Technology Manager (AUTM). She received her J.D. at Emory University School of Law. Prior to joining AUTM, she served as the associate vice president for technology transfer and business incubation at the University of South Florida. She previously worked as a science advisor with a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., and participated in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellowship program.

Joelle Mendez-Hinds is a patent marketing intern in the Technology Transfer Office/Division of Patents & Licensing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

David Winwood is chief executive officer of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Foundation and senior associate vice president for Economic Development and Innovation Alliances. Prior to joining UAB, Winwood served North Carolina State University and The Ohio State University. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness Regional Innovation Initiative Expert Committee and serves on boards of directors for the Council on Governmental Relations, Biotechnology Association of Alabama, Birmingham Venture Club, Innovation Depot, and TechBirmingham.

Vinit Nijhawan, is managing director of the Office of Technology Development and director of Enterprise Programs at the Institute of Technology at Boston University, Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at BU. He received his B.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. He has more than twenty-five years of experience building five startups and was CEO of three of them. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of TiE Global, a non-profit that fosters entrepreneurship globally; special assistant to the vice president of research; and director of the Kindle Mentoring Program at BU.

Todd Sherer, is associate vice president for research administration and executive director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in toxicology at Washington State University. Prior to joining Emory, he was director of the Office of Technology and Research Collaborations at Oregon Health & Science University. He served as president of AUTM and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

John F. Ritter, is director of the Office of Technology Licensing at Princeton University. Prior to joining Princeton, he served as a senior licensing professional at Rutgers University. He is secretary of the Review Panel on Conflict of Interest in Research. He received his J.D. from Rutgers School of Law and his M.B.A from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Paul R. Sanberg, is senior vice president for research and innovation and Distinguished University Professor at the University of South Florida, and founder and president of the National Academy of Inventors. He is an inventor on over 30 licensed health-related U.S. patents and a highly cited author with more than 600 publications. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, NAI, Royal Societies (Medicine, Chemistry and Public Health), AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador, and serves on the evaluation committee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2019 Fellows

The National Academy of Inventors has elected 168 academic inventors to the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 3, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 prolific academic innovators from across the world to NAI Fellow status.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

The NAI Fellows Program highlights academic inventors who have demonstrated a spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. Election to NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors. To date, NAI Fellows hold more than 41,500 issued U.S. patents, which have generated over 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, and created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, over $1.6 trillion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries.

“Congratulations to the 2019 class of NAI Fellows,” said Laura A. Peter, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “It is a privilege to welcome these exceptionally-qualified individuals to this prestigious organization. I am certain their accomplishments will inspire the next generation of invention pioneers.”

Peter will be the keynote speaker at the 2020 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, April 10, 2020, in Phoenix, Arizona, a commemorative event at the Ninth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors. At the ceremony, Fellows will be formally inducted by Peter and NAI President Paul R. Sanberg in recognition of their outstanding achievements. “I am so impressed by the caliber of this year’s class of NAI Fellows, all of whom are highly-regarded in their respective fields,” said Sanberg. “The breadth and scope of their discovery is truly staggering. I’m excited not only see their work continue, but also to see their knowledge influence a new era of science, technology, and innovation worldwide.” The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Ernesto V. Abel-Santos, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
    David A. Ahlquist, Mayo Clinic
    Susan D. Allen, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
    Andrea Alù , City University of New York Advanced Science Research Center,
    Photonics Initiative
    Guillermo A. Ameer, Northwestern University
    Subramaniam Ananthan, Southern Research Institute
    Gattadahalli M. Anantharamaiah, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
    Nirwan Ansari, New Jersey Institute of Technology
    Rodolphe Barrango, North Carolina State University
    Rena Bizio, The University of Texas at San Antonio
    Michael Blaber, Florida State University
    Anne J. Blaschke-Bonkowsky, The University of Utah
    Stephen A. Boppart, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Robert Bowser, Barrow Neurological Institute
    Michael S. Brown, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
    Ardeshir (Adi) Ratan Bulsara, Naval Information Warfare Center
    Jason Burdick, University of Pennsylvania
    Lewis C. Cantley, Cornell University
    Michael L. Chabinyc, University of California, Santa Barbara
    Bryce Chackerian, The University of New Mexico
    Paul Citron, University of California, San Diego
    John P. Cooke, Houston Methodist Research Institute
    Jerome Cox, Washington University in St. Louis
    Seamus Curran, University of Houston
    Pamela B. Davis, Case Western Reserve University
    Cristina E. Davis, University of California, Davis
    Peter B. Dervan, California Institute of Technology
    Tejal A. Desai, University of California, San Francisco
    Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
    Jon P. Dobson, University of Florida
    Francis Joseph Doyle, III, Harvard University
    Dongsheng Duan, University of Missouri-Columbia
    Dean B. Edwards, University of Idaho
    Ayman Sabry El-Baz, University of Louisville
    John F. Engelhardt, University of Iowa
    Laura Ensign, Johns Hopkins University
    William J. Federspiel, University of Pittsburgh
    Terri Fiez, University of Colorado Boulder
    Francis Stuart Foster, University of Toronto
    Kaizhong Gao, Argonne National Laboratory
    Adolfo Garcia-Sastre, Mount Sinai Health System
    Glenn R. Gaudette, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
    Robert J. Genco, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
    Georgios B. Giannakis, University of Minnesota
    John Murray Gibson, Florida A&M University
    Joseph L. Goldstein, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
    Kenneth E. Goodson, Stanford University
    Renukaradhya J. Gourapura, The Ohio State University
    David Grewell, North Dakota State University
    David Grier, New York University
    Robert E. Guldberg, University of Oregon
    Bernard Franklin Gupton, Virginia Commonwealth University
    Horst Hahn, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology/University of California, Irvine
    Yousef Haik, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
    Robert P. Hammer, Louisiana State University
    Luis Rafael Herrera-Estrella, Texas Tech University/Centro de
    Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

 

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology and Innovation’s latest issue explores innovative technologies and methodologies, including the intersection of dance and assistive technology, blockchain platform payments, and customer-centric practices applied to academia.

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 20, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation® (21:1) features a selection of papers highlighting innovations in fields as varied as medicine, finance, and pedagogy. Taking the broad view of mindsets and skillsets powering progress for the future, authors delve into the rich rewards to be found in using the intersection of dance and assistive technology to ignite creative advancements in both areas, recommendations for moving the needle on women’s participation in patent-rich disciplines and jobs, and the application of customer-centric practices from management disciplines to academia, among others

Of particular interest is Dr. Nasser Arshadi’s “Blockchain Platform for Real-Time Payments: A Less Costly and More Secure Alternative to ACH.” Given the increasing focus on blockchain, this paper offers a timely survey of the history and a cogent evaluation of the promise of this platform. After a discussion of the development of banking and automated clearing house (ACH) legacy systems, Arshadi examines the blockchain platform for real-time payments as an alternative. When compared to our current use of ACH in the U.S., Arshadi calculates that the use of real-time blockchain protocol equals billions of dollars of saving for businesses and customers.

“This publication represents an opportunity to share best practices across a number of critical platforms,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, leader of the knowledge enterprise development at Arizona State University and vice president for strategic initiatives membership for the National Academy of Inventors. “It also provides insight into niche areas of emerging technology that are important in our various capacities as researchers, scientists, inventors, and educators.”

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic Innovation

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.
 

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Lee, University of California, Irvine
  • Anna M. Leese de Escobar, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Warren J. Leonard, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, NIH
  • Johannes A. Lercher, Technical University of Munich
  • Teik C. Lim, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Craig W. Lindsley, Vanderbilt University/Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience and Drug Discovery
  • Elizabeth G. Loboa, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Ted L. Maddess, Australian National University
  • Elizabeth M. McNally, Northwestern University
  • Muriel Medard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Ellis Meng, University of Southern California
  • Joachim Messing, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Lalit K. Mestha, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Lyle R. Middendorf, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Shaker A. Mousa, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science
  • William P. Murphy, Jr., Florida International University
  • William L. Murphy, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Prakash Nagarkatti, University of South Carolina
  • Nathan Newman, Arizona State University
  • Bert W. O’Malley, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Aydogan Ozcan, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Muthukumaran Packirisamy, Concordia University
  • Drew M. Pardoll, Johns Hopkins University
  • Roderic I. Pettigrew, Texas A&M University
  • Apparao M. Rao, Clemson Nanomaterials Institute/Clemson University
  • Theodore S. Rappaport, New York University
  • Rafael Reif, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joshua Rokach, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Yoram Rudy, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Wheeler Ruml, University of New Hampshire
  • Thomas P. Russell, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Jagannathan Sarangapani, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Vinod Sarin, Boston University
  • Rahul Sarpeshkar, Dartmouth College
  • Steven J. Sasson, University of South Florida
  • Christine E. Schmidt, University of Florida
  • Zheng John Shen, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Thomas E. Shenk, Princeton University
  • Mark B. Shiflett, University of Kansas
  • Michael L. Simpson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory/The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Koji Sode, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Costas M. Soukoulis, Iowa State University/Ames Laboratory
  • John W. Spirk, Cleveland Clinic
  • Gary Stacey, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • William Studier, Brookhaven National Laboratory
  • Samuel I. Stupp, Northwestern University
  • Koduvayur P. Subbalakshmi, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Bruce A. Sullenger, Duke University
  • Xiuzhi Susan Sun, Kansas State University
  • Jing Sun, University of Michigan
  • Yu Sun, University of Toronto
  • Wanchun Tang, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Susan S. Taylor, University of California, San Diego
  • Bhavani Thuraisingham, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • David A. Tirrell, California Institute of Technology
  • Don M. Tucker, University of Oregon
  • Jeffrey S. Vitter, The University of Mississippi
  • Israel E. Wachs, Lehigh University
  • Albert Wang, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael S. Waterman, University of Southern California
  • Alan W. Weimer, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Louis M. Weiner, Georgetown University
  • Robert G. Wilhelm, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
  • Yushan Yan, University of Delaware
  • Jian Yang, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Eui-Hyeok Yang, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Mark H. Yim, The University of Pennsylvania
  • Michael J. Yost, Medical University of South Carolina
  • James M. Zavislan, University of Rochester
  • Ruiwen Zhang, University of Houston
  • Huda Y. Zoghbi, Baylor College of Medicine

Beyond Accessibility

Technology & Innovation’s latest issue, “Technologies for Disabilities,” focuses on new solutions and new paradigms for assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

Tampa, Fla. (Nov. 28, 2018) Technology & Innovation (T&I), journal of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), has released a new special topic issue titled “Technologies for Disabilities.” The issue delves into revolutionary devices, cutting-edge materials and processes, and new theories on designing for users with disabilities.

In every sector of modern society, technological advancements have transformed the way the world works, travels, communicates, and learns. However, not all have been equal beneficiaries of these innovations.

One billion people – the 15 percent of the world’s population who have some form of disability – have largely been left behind by technologies designed for and targeted towards people without disabilities. The new issue of T&I, (20:1-2) (full text) focuses on researchers who are attempting to correct this disparity by creating revolutionary new devices and radically changing how we design assistive and rehabilitative technologies.

“Enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities has been the goal of much of my research, and it is the goal of this special issue as well,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, vice president of the NAI and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “By designing technology where accessibility is the goal rather than an afterthought, we are setting the stage for better and more inclusive technological solutions.”

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

Two Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors Win Nobel Prizes

James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 25, 2018) – James P. Allison, Ph.D., and Frances H. Arnold, Ph.D., both Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were awarded the Nobel Prizes in Medicine and Chemistry, respectively.

Allison was jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine, sharing the honor with Dr. Tasuku Honjo of Kyoto University. Allison and Honjo received the prize “for their discovery of cancer therapy by inhibition of negative immune regulation.”

“I was trying to understand how T cells worked,” Allison told Adam Smith, an interviewer for TheNobelPrize.org. “I figured out this one thing about this negative regulator, and I had this idea that if we just took that off, maybe it would do a better job of killing cancer cells. Turns out it works.”

Allison was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2017. He also received the Wolf Prize in Medicine in 2017, and he received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award in 2015.

Arnold received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry “for the directed evolution of enzymes.” She conducted the first directed evolution of enzymes in 1993.

“I was able to look at the problem with a totally fresh set of eyes – a problem that had challenged people since the techniques were available,” Arnold said in a phone interview, moments after receiving the award. “I realized that the way that most people were going about protein engineering was doomed to failure.”

Arnold has since refined the methods that are now routinely used to develop new catalysts. She was elected Fellow of the NAI in 2014. She was also inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2014, and she received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation in 2011.

“We are thrilled to congratulate Allison and Arnold on these momentous achievements,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

National Academy of Inventors Releases 2018 Activities Report

The National Academy of Inventors has released its annual Activities Report, which catalogs each of the organization’s programs, membership categories, publications and yearly events.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 2, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) published its annual Activities Report today, which highlights the organization’s major events, programs and members.

The 2018 Activities Report features two new programs: the Senior Member program and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). The Senior Member program welcomes inventors early in their careers who aspire to make an impact on the academic community. GAIN is a mentoring platform exclusively available to NAI members.

“The annual Activities Report is our chance to feature our members and the incredible work they do,” said Spencer Montgomery, NAI Director. “The report spotlights inventors at each of our Sustaining Member Institutions, reviews the 2018 Annual Meeting and explains our newest programs.”

The 2018 Activities Report includes statistics on the impact NAI Fellows make on their communities, including how many companies they have formed, how many jobs they have created and more. The report highlights the NAI’s 2018 Annual Meeting, held in Washington, D.C. last April, which brought together over 450 members of the organization.

The publication provides updates and details on each of the NAI’s programs, including the Fellows program, Senior Member program, GAIN platform, NAI Chapter program and the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It concludes with a list of each member of the 2017 class of Fellows, who were inducted at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

The 2018 Activities Report is available online. Physical copies are available upon request.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches New Membership

The National Academy of Inventors’ Senior Member program honors early-stage inventors and innovators who aspire to make a real impact on society through the patenting and commercialization processes.

Tampa, Fla. (Oct. 1, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has launched a new membership category, the Senior Member program. The program will recognize and honor early-stage academic inventors who aspire to make a real impact on society through invention and innovation. 

The NAI Senior Member program seeks active researchers and professionals who demonstrate success in patenting, licensing and commercialization activities, and foster a spirit of innovation through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

“The Senior Member program is an exciting addition to our existing membership,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “Inventors who seek to influence and support the academic invention ecosystem have the opportunity to join the NAI’s global network of innovators striving toward a common goal.”

Elected NAI Senior Members will have access to the NAI’s premier mentorship platform, the Global Academic Inventor Network, exclusively available to NAI members. They will also have opportunities for networking and education through NAI-led panels, meetings, and committees, including the opportunity to publish in NAI’s Technology & Innovation journal.

“This program has been carefully constructed to welcome and honor a new cadre of academic inventors into our community,” said Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. “We look forward to recognizing young innovators and academically-minded individuals in the early stages of their innovation careers who aspire to reach new heights within the invention community.”

Nominations for the NAI Senior Member program opened today, and the organization will continue to accept nomination submissions on a rolling basis. Notices of election will be announced quarterly, with the inaugural class election slated for February 2019.

Eligible individuals should hold at minimum one issued U.S. patent from the United States Patent and Trademark Office which has been licensed or commercialized. As an alternative, candidates may demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding five or more U.S. patents. All nominees must be affiliated with a Member Institution of the NAI.

For more information, visit the NAI website or contact Jacquie Burckley, Senior Member Coordinator, at [email protected].

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

United States Senate Resolution Recognizes the National Academy of Inventors

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 27, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has been officially recognized by the United States Senate through Senate Resolution 620, introduced as a bipartisan measure by Democratic Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri and affirmed unanimously by the full Senate on Aug. 28, 2018. 

The resolution recognizes the NAI and honors the organization’s milestone of achieving 200 member institutions.

In addition to acknowledging the NAI’s “rapid expansion,” the resolution affirms that the Senate “supports the mission of the National Academy of Inventors [and]…acknowledges the National Academy of Inventors for its role in elevating the contributions of academic inventors across all disciplines.”

“It is an honor to be recognized by the U.S. Senate for the NAI’s success in encouraging academic innovation in the United States and internationally,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “We greatly appreciate and thank Senators Nelson and Blunt for sponsoring this resolution and ensuring its swift passage.”

The NAI was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI partners closely with the USPTO in the pursuit of this mission.

“Through the doors of the USPTO walk inventors and entrepreneurs with innovations that will spur investment, create new jobs, grow our economy, and help us achieve our highest ideals,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. “Many of these will come from the National Academy of Inventors.”

The NAI now boasts more than 4,000 individual members and fellows spanning over 250 universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes.

“We are proud of the measurable impact that the NAI and our member institutions and individual inventor members and fellows are making throughout the world,” said Sanberg.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation.www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Three NAI Fellows Inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame

Three Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors were welcomed into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame for their significant impact on Florida’s innovation landscape.

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 11, 2018) – Dr. Emery Brown, Dr. Richard Houghten and Dr. Sudipta Seal, all Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), were inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame on September 7, 2018. Seven innovators were inducted during the ceremony, which was held at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

Brown, Houghten and Seal join a number of NAI Fellows who have previously received this recognition, including NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg.

“It is a momentous feeling to see that nearly half of this year’s inductees to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame are NAI Fellows,” Sanberg said. “Dr. Brown, Dr. Houghten and Dr. Seal have made an incredible impact on the innovation landscape in Florida, and we are proud to support them as they receive this well-deserved honor.”

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates those inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the United States.

“It has been wonderful to see Florida embrace and elevate its own proud history of invention through the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame,” said Andrew Hirshfeld, Commissioner for Patents at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. “Through this organization, Florida has rightly claimed its mantel as a leader in national innovation.”

Brown is Director of the Neuroscience Statistics Research Lab at Massachusetts General Hospital. Throughout his career, he has made major contributions to the advancement of the science and practice of anesthesiology. He holds three issued U.S. patents.

Houghten founded the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and currently serves as CEO. His research has had significant impact on the pharmaceutical industry, and his innovative approach has revolutionized drug discovery across the nation. He holds 81 issued U.S. patents.

Seal is Trustee Chair, Pegasus and University Distinguished Professor at the University of Central Florida. His expertise in materials science and engineering led to groundbreaking discoveries and therapeutic applications of nano cerium oxide in regenerative nano-medicine. He holds 48 issued U.S. patents and his technology is licensed to multiple companies.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Launches Global Academic Inventor Network

The National Academy of Inventors aims to connect seasoned and world-renowned academic inventors with students and other junior professionals to aid them in advancing their innovative careers. 

Tampa, Fla. (Sept. 5, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) today announced the launch of the Global Academic Inventors Network (GAIN). GAIN is an international mentoring platform exclusively available to academic inventors.

NAI President Paul R. Sanberg first announced the concept of a global network at the NAI’s Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. in April 2018.

“It is our hope that this network helps ease the process for emerging inventors as they take an initial idea through the entire discovery process and, then, licensing and commercializing that technology for the benefit of society,” Sanberg said.

GAIN is one of a number of initiatives that the NAI has announced in 2018. The platform is engineered to make it easy for inventive students and faculty to connect, while giving them the tools, automation and security to bring the global invention community together and drive innovation.

“The Global Academic Inventors Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration,” said Dr. Karen J.L. Burg, member of the NAI Board of Directors. “By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasoned inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

For a limited time, NAI Sustaining Member Institutions, Chapters and Fellows will receive exclusive priority access to join GAIN. Following the initial launch stage, the NAI will open the platform to the entire NAI community.

 

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

The Invention Gender Gap

Special topic issue explores the gender gap between men and women in inventorship, analyzing its causes, evaluating current efforts to address it, and suggesting new ideas to eliminate this disparity 

Tampa, Fla. (Jul. 16, 2018) – Statistics show that women are named as inventors on less than one in five U.S. patents. Why does this gender disparity exist, and what is being done to address it? The new issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors ® (19:4) (full text) tackles these key questions, and the papers collected here serve as a primer on the state of the invention gender gap, why it persists, and what can be done to change it.

“There is perhaps no area more crucial to explore than the gender gap in invention,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and co-editor-in-chief of T&I. “The persistence of this problem cuts us off from leveraging the full innovative potential of half of our population, thus reducing our innovative output and making us less competitive as a nation. In addition to the many articles on the gender gap, we are also taking this opportunity to honor our women NAI Fellows, as are the National Inventors Hall of Fame and the National Science and Technology Medals Foundation with their respective women Inductees and Laureates.”

The full issue highlights can be found at the following link: https://academyofinventors.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Issue-Highlights-Aesthetic-Final.pdf

 

ARTICLES INCLUDED:

  • Feminist Challenge to Gene Patents
  • Gender Data Gap: Baseline of U.S. Academic Institutions
  • Engaging Women Innovators: Analytical Support For Women Innovator Programming in University Technology Transfer
  • Strategies to Close the Gender Gap in Invention and Technology Commercialization
  • On the Commercialization Path: Entrepreneurship and Intellectual Property Outputs among Women in STEM
  • Closing Diversity Gaps in Innovation: Gender, Race, and Income Disparities in Patenting and Commercialization of Inventions
  • Addressing the Gender Gap among Patent Holders through Invention Education Policies
  • Breaking Barriers: Female Inventors Blazing a Path Forward
  • From the USPTO: Mind the Gap—The USPTO’s Efforts to Narrow the Gender Gap in Patenting and Innovation
  • The NAI Fellow Profile: An Interview with Dr. Michelle Khine
  • Investing in Academic Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship: Moving Beyond Research Funding through the NSF I-CORPS® Program
  • On the Software Patenting Controversy
  • NAI Chapter Spotlight: University of Southern California
  • Innovation in Action: Arizona State University

 

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 Announced

Top University Patent Holders Revealed in Report Authored by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla. (June 5, 2018) – The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2017 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) is used to compile the report, which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

Published annually since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, the report ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO during the 2017 calendar year. The full report can be found at: https://www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/top-100-universities-2017.pdf

“The institutions on this list are doing incredible work promoting academic innovation and incubating groundbreaking technologies which exemplify the importance of technology transfer to institutional success,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are proud to collaborate with the IPO for the sixth consecutive year and it is a privilege to showcase the vital contributions to society made by universities.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2017 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, The University of Texas System, Stanford University, Tsinghua University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Johns Hopkins University, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Harvard University and California Institute of Technology.

“University patents help to ignite a culture of growth and innovation which in turn stimulates local, regional, and global economies and generates funding for future research initiatives,” said Mark W. Lauroesch, IPO Executive Director. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents is a report which demonstrates the critical role universities play in patents, licensing and commercialization.”

IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2017 will be released for the 35th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2017 calendar year. For patents with one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected].

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions, and growing rapidly. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO
The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

 

RENOWNED RESEARCHERS, POLICYMAKERS, AND ACADEMIC LEADERS TO CONVERGE IN WASHINGTON, D.C. FOR 2018 NAI CONFERENCE

The Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 4-6

WASHINGTON, April 3, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Over 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Washington, D.C. on April 4-6 for the Seventh Annual Conference of the NAI. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Ronald M. Evans, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and professor at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies; David J. Skorton, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; Gilda A. Barabino, dean of the City College of New York and president of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering; and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will also include the NAI’s second annual Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s seventh annual conference is “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Intersection of Innovation and the Future, Intersection of Ideas and Entrepreneurship, and Intersection of Academia, Government, and Industry. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

“Our nation’s capital provides a fitting backdrop as we explore the intersections of academia, industry, and government in the innovation space,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The conference program engages with these wide-ranging facets of academic invention through timely panels and presentations, the induction of the newest class of NAI Fellows, and the Student Innovation Showcase. I look forward to three days of networking and learning with our attendees, while honoring the amazing accomplishments of our members.”

The NAI will induct the newest class of Fellows on April 5 at the Mayflower Hotel, Autograph Collection, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“I am honored to join the NAI as the annual conference returns to Washington for another year of insightful programming,” Hirshfeld said. “The NAI has initiated an exciting dialogue on academic innovation that continues to gain momentum. I look forward to recognizing the next class of NAI Fellows and their substantial contributions in academic discovery and innovation which improve our quality of life and influence the next generation of thought leaders.”

Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents, which have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs. In addition, over $137 billion in revenue has been generated based on NAI Fellow discoveries. Among all NAI Fellows there are over 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, more than 440 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, 37 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, and 29 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

The meeting will conclude with NAI’s Student Innovation Showcase. The showcase, in its second year, offers a unique platform for students to demonstrate world-changing inventions to the highest caliber of innovators. Six interdisciplinary student teams from prestigious research universities, including The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, University of South Florida, University of Southern California, Virginia Commonwealth University, and Worcester Polytechnic University have been invited to exhibit their inventions to a panel of prolific inventors.

“As both an inventor and administrator, I cannot overemphasize the importance of fostering young inventors throughout their academic trajectories,” said Helena Wisniewski, vice provost for research & graduate studies at the University of Alaska Anchorage, NAI Fellow, and Student Innovation Showcase judge. “I am delighted to see the NAI continue to engage its network of prominent academic inventors to support the next generation of innovators, and I look forward to serving as a judge for the Student Innovation Showcase.”

A detailed agenda is available at https://www.academyofinventors.org/conference/docs/2018-nai-conference-preliminary-agenda.pdf. Invited papers from the conference will be published in the NAI journal Technology and Innovation. To learn more about Technology and Innovation, visit https://www.academyofinventors.org/ti/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. Our mission is to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the USPTO, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. Learn more at www.academyofinventors.org.

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2017 FELLOWS

155 academic inventors honored with esteemed distinction

TAMPA, Fla., Dec. 12, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 155 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2017 class there are now 912 NAI Fellows, representing over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2017 Fellows are named inventors on nearly 6,000 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 32,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 100 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 439 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 36 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 52 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; 29 Nobel Laureates; 261 AAAS Fellows; 168 IEEE Fellows; and 142 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional accolade bestowed to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. As detailed in the 2017 NAI Activities Report, published in Sept. 2017, NAI Fellows have generated more than 9,400 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.3 million jobs, with over $137 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“Congratulations to the exceptional academic inventors who comprise the 2017 class of NAI Fellows,” said Shirley Malcom, Head of the Directorate for Education and Human Resources Programs at the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It was my privilege to support the important mission of the NAI as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee. The NAI Fellows Program plays a vital role in bringing to the forefront the essential scientific and economic contributions of our nation’s inventors.”

On 5 Apr. 2018, the 2017 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Seventh Annual NAI Conference in Washington, DC. Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Commissioner for Patents, will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“Once again, I am in awe of the inventors elected as NAI Fellows. It was my honor to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and participate in this unique recognition of impactful patented contributions to science and technology,” Hirshfeld said, “I look forward to celebrating this remarkable group at the 2018 NAI Conference at the Smithsonian American Art Museum which was once known as the Temple of Invention during its years as the first dedicated home of the U.S. Patent Office. This historic national landmark serves as an extremely fitting location to once again showcase inventors and their technologies.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2017 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2017 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows, U.S. National Medals recipients, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“I am incredibly proud to welcome our 2017 Fellows to the Academy,” said NAI President Paul Sanberg. “These accomplished individuals represent the pinnacle of achievement at the intersection of academia and invention—their discoveries have changed the way we view the world. They epitomize the triumph of a university culture that celebrates patents, licensing, and commercialization, and we look forward to engaging their talents to further support academic innovation.”

The 2017 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full-page announcement in the 19 Jan. 2018 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Science and Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors.

2017 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Samuel I. Achilefu, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dereje Agonafer, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Mark G. Allen, University of Pennsylvania
  • James P. Allison, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
  • Hiroshi Amano, Nagoya University
  • Richard R. Anderson, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Leif Andersson, Texas A&M University and Uppsala University
  • J. Roger P. Angel, The University of Arizona
  • Diran Apelian, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Plamen B. Atanassov, The University of New Mexico
  • Craig H. Benson, University of Virginia
  • Cory J. Berkland, The University of Kansas
  • Vijayakumar Bhagavatula, Carnegie Mellon University
  • David J. Bishop, Boston University
  • Donald L. Bitzer, North Carolina State University
  • Randy D. Blakely, Florida Atlantic University
  • Helen M. Blau, Stanford University
  • Timothy M. Block, Baruch S. Blumberg Institute
  • Daniel J. Blumenthal, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Susmita Bose, Washington State University
  • Steven T. Boyce, University of Cincinnati
  • Edward S. Boyden, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Anthony B. Brennan, University of Florida
  • Carrie L. Byington, Texas A&M University
  • Marvin H. Caruthers, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Dennis S. Charney, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Yang-Tse Cheng, University of Kentucky
  • Yet Ming Chiang, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joanne Chory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mooi Choo Chuah, Lehigh University
  • David E. Clemmer, Indiana University
  • Geoffrey W. Coates, Cornell University
  • Stanley N. Cohen, Stanford University
  • James E. Crowe, Jr., Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Pieter Cullis, The University of British Columbia
  • Mari Dezawa, Tohoku University
  • William L. Ditto, North Carolina State University
  • Prabir K. Dutta, The Ohio State University
  • Jack A. Elias, Brown University
  • Zhigang Z. Fang, The University of Utah
  • Tim A. Fischell, Michigan State University and Western Michigan University
  • Paul B. Fisher, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Edward P. Furlani, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Guangping Gao, University of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University
  • Bruce E. Gnade, Southern Methodist University
  • Lawrence Gold, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Sheila A. Grant, University of Missouri, Columbia
  • Mark A. Griswold, Case Western Reserve University
  • Horng-Jyh Harn, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital
  • Robert W. Heath, Jr., The University of Texas at Austin
  • Walter Brown Herbst, Northwestern University
  • Mark C. Hersam, Northwestern University
  • David M. Holtzman, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ming Hsieh, University of Southern California
  • Ian W. Hunter, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Mikko Hupa, Åbo Akademi University
  • Oliver C. Ibe, University of Massachusetts, Lowell
  • Eric D. Isaacs, The University of Chicago
  • Subramanian S. Iyer, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Joseph A. Izatt, Duke University
  • William R. Jacobs, Jr., Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Rakesh K. Jain, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University
  • Stephen Albert Johnston, Arizona State University
  • Ranu Jung, Florida International University
  • Brian L. Justus, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
  • Alexander V. Kabanov, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Aravinda Kar, University of Central Florida
  • Kazunori Kataoka, The University of Tokyo
  • Howard E. Katz, Johns Hopkins University
  • Arie E. Kaufman, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Donald B. Keck, University of South Florida
  • Jeffery W. Kelly, The Scripps Research Institute
  • David V. Kerns, Jr., Olin College of Engineering
  • Robert S. Keynton, University of Louisville
  • Dennis K. Killinger, University of South Florida
  • Kwang J. Kim, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
  • Wayne H. Knox, University of Rochester
  • Philip T. Kortum, Rice University
  • Philip T. Krein, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • John J. La Scala, U.S. Army Research Laboratory
  • Jonathan J. Langberg, Emory University
  • Sang Yup Lee, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
  • Fred C. Lee, Virginia Tech
  • Eric C. Leuthardt, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Nathan S. Lewis, California Institute of Technology
  • Tsu-Jae King Liu, University of California, Berkeley
  • Chih-Yuan Lu, National Taiwan University
  • Zhenqiang Ma, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Michele Marcolongo, Drexel University
  • Laura Marcu, University of California, Davis
  • R. Kenneth Marcus, Clemson University
  • Gary S. Margules, Nova Southeastern University
  • Mary Helen McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • Kishor C. Mehta, Texas Tech University
  • Deirdre R. Meldrum, Arizona State University
  • Bhubaneswar Mishra, New York University
  • Gregory Moller, University of Idaho
  • Clayton Daniel Mote, Jr., University of Maryland
  • Shouleh Nikzad, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • John R. Nottingham, Case Western Reserve University and Cleveland Clinic
  • Mariappan P. Paranthaman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
  • Christopher R. Parish, The Australian National University
  • Peter L.T. Pirolli, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Daniel A. Portnoy, University of California, Berkeley
  • Dennis W. Prather, University of Delaware
  • Paul R. Prucnal, Princeton University
  • Nirmala Ramanujam, Duke University
  • Jennifer L. Rexford, Princeton University
  • Kenner C. Rice, National Institutes of Health
  • Camillo Ricordi, University of Miami
  • Gabriel Alfonso Rincón-Mora, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Bruce R. Rosen, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Barbara O. Rothbaum, Emory University
  • Jonathan M. Rothberg, Yale University
  • Max F. Rothschild, Iowa State University
  • Clinton T. Rubin, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Henry Samueli, University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Irvine
  • Ulrich S. Schubert, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena
  • Paul A. Seib, Kansas State University
  • Terrence J. Sejnowski, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Mohammad Shahidehpour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Yun-Qing Shi, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Subhash L. Shinde, University of Notre Dame
  • Richard W. Siegel, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • Krishna P. Singh, University of Pennsylvania
  • Hyongsok T. Soh, Stanford University
  • Steven L. Stice, University of Georgia
  • Steven L. Suib, University of Connecticut
  • Russell H. Taylor, Johns Hopkins University
  • Jeffrey A. Toretsky, Georgetown University
  • Rocky S. Tuan, University of Pittsburgh and The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Robert Vince, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew J. Viterbi, University of Southern California
  • Tuan Vo-Dinh, Duke University
  • Scott A. Waldman, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Thomas A. Waldmann, National Cancer Institute
  • Peter Walter, University of California, San Francisco
  • Fei Wang, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Scott C. Weaver, The University of Texas Medical Branch
  • Thomas J. Webster, Northeastern University
  • Chin-Long Wey, National Chiao Tung University
  • Lorne Whitehead, The University of British Columbia
  • Cheryl L. Willman, The University of New Mexico
  • Alan N. Willson, Jr., University of California, Los Angeles
  • Teresa K. Woodruff, Northwestern University
  • Amy E. Wright, Florida Atlantic University
  • Eli Yablonovitch, University of California, Berkeley
  • Paul Yager, University of Washington
  • Jackie Y. Ying, Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology
  • Bin Yu, SUNY Polytechnic Institute
  • Mona E. Zaghloul, The George Washington University
  • Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University
  • Lynn Zechiedrich, Baylor College of Medicine

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. UTILITY PATENTS FOR 2016 ANNOUNCED

Top University Patent Holders Unveiled in Report by the NAI and IPO

TAMPA, Fla., June 6, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2016 has been announced by The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). Data is obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to compile the report which highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

The report, which has been published each year since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, collects the rankings by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report can be found at: www.academyofinventors.com/pdf/top-100-universities-2016.pdf.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes, products and treatments which provide significant societal benefit as well as generate job creation that sustains and helps grow our local, regional and global economy,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “It is an honor to recognize the top patent holders through this report in collaboration with IPO for the fifth consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2016 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, California Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, The University of Texas System, University of Michigan, and Columbia University.

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NAI CONFERENCE TO BRING WORLD RENOWNED ACADEMIC INVENTORS AND ASPIRING INNOVATORS TO BOSTON

The 6th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 5-7

BOSTON, April 4, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – Nearly 400 constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Boston April 5-7 for the Sixth Annual Conference. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Lisa Seacat DeLuca, IBM’s most prolific female inventor, and H. Robert Horvitz, Nobel Laureate and professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The meeting also will include the NAI’s inaugural Student Innovation Showcase.

The theme of the NAI’s sixth annual conference is “Recognizing Pillars of Academic Innovation,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Changing the Academic Innovation Landscape, Issues Relating to Public Policy and Entrepreneurship and Commercialization Drive the Future of Innovation. Presenters include academic luminaries among the NAI’s members and Fellows as well as university leaders, government officials, and student innovators.

The NAI will induct the newly elected Fellows on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, where Hirshfeld will deliver a keynote address.

“It is an honor to once again participate in the NAI’s Annual Conference and the induction of some of our nation’s most esteemed academic inventors,” Hirshfeld said. “It is extremely gratifying to watch the NAI grow into one of the leading organizations that promotes invention by emphasizing the role of patents. I look forward to honoring the newest class of NAI Fellows and their vital contributions to society.”

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NAI FELLOWS AMONG FLORIDA INVENTORS HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES

Four NAI Fellows Recognized for Innovative Contributions to State of Florida

TAMPA, Fla. – Four National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows are among the eight inventors elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame honors and celebrates inventors whose achievements have advanced the quality of life for Floridians, the state of Florida and the nation.

NAI Fellows elected to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame include:

Issa Batarseh, director of the Energy System Integration Division at the Florida Power Electronics Center and professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Central Florida, was elected for innovative research which led to the creation of the first compact single solar photovoltaic (PV) panel.

Kenneth M. Ford, co-founder and CEO of the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, was elected for his pioneering work in artificial intelligence and human-centered computing.

Richard D. Gitlin, State of Florida 21st Century World Class Scholar, Distinguished University Professor, and the Agere Systems endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of South Florida, was elected for his inventive research and development in digital communications, broadband networking, and wireless systems.

T. Dwayne McCay, president and CEO of the Florida Institute of Technology, is being inducted along with his wife, Mary Helen McCay, for their novel approaches to laser induced surface improvements.

The Florida Inventors Hall of Fame was recognized by the Florida Senate in 2014 with a resolution sponsored by Senator Jeff Brandes that commended the Hall of Fame “for its commitment to honoring inventors and celebrating innovation, discovery, and excellence.” The Hall of Fame is located at the University of South Florida in Tampa and supported, in part, by the Florida High Tech Corridor Council.

The newly elected Hall of Fame innovators be inducted at the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame 4th Annual Induction Ceremony & Gala on Sep. 8, 2017, at the Hilton Tampa Downtown.

A complete list of Florida Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, including biographical information, is available here: www.FloridaInvents.org.

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BILL INTRODUCED TO GRANT FEDERAL CHARTER TO NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS

Congressman Dennis Ross Introduces Bipartisan Legislation to Recognize the NAI’s Role in Advancing Academic Innovation

TAMPA, Fla., Feb. 9, 2017 /PRNewswire/ – U.S. Rep. Dennis A. Ross (R-FL-15) has introduced H.R. 976, a bill to grant federal charter to the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). This bipartisan legislation would recognize the importance of the NAI’s mission of advancing a culture where academic invention and innovation is celebrated for its role in fueling our nation’s economy.

The NAI is a non-profit member organization comprised of more than 240 U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutions, with more than 3,000 individual inventor members and Fellows.

H.R. 976 would provide an honorific designation symbolizing the significance of the NAI’s mission, goals and objectives in benefiting the public. The charter would also allow NAI members to be called upon as advisors by any department of the government. NAI members are contributors to fields including medicine, cybersecurity, veteran’s research, and engineering among many others.

The NAI Fellows Program has 757 Fellows worldwide representing more than 229 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in July 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with more than $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

“NAI members among our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies and translating them into innovative products, processes, cures, and treatments, for the betterment of society,” Ross said, “I am proud to introduce this important bill to help further the mission of the NAI and allow their members to serve our government as subject matter experts on innovation, intellectual property, translational research and commercialization.”

The NAI is seeking additional support for this bill which currently has two original co-sponsors including: Daniel Lipinski [IL-3] and Rep. Kathy Castor [FL-14].

“We are very grateful to Congressman Ross and the supporting co-sponsors for introducing this important charter bill which recognizes the vital role academic innovation plays in moving our nation forward,” said Paul R. Sanberg, the NAI’s founder and president and the Senior Vice President for Research, Innovation & Economic Development at the University of South Florida.

“For generations, America’s academic inventors have been at the forefront of modernizing every aspect of our lives and keeping our nation economically strong and competitive. A federal charter for the National Academy of Inventors serves the public good in supporting intellectual property, translational research and commercialization. We are honored to be considered for this recognition and to continue the NAI’s work in supporting and advancing the cause of innovation and invention.”

For more information on how to encourage your congressional delegation to support this initiative, please contact Keara Leach at 813-974-5862, [email protected].

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2016 FELLOWS

Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 13, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status.

With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 94 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 376 members of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; 28 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 45 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 28 Nobel Laureates, 216 AAAS Fellows, 126 IEEE Fellows, and 116 Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society. According to the 2016 NAI Activities Report, published in Jul. 2016, NAI Fellows have generated more than 8,500 licensed technologies and companies and created more than 1.1 million jobs, with over $100 billion in revenue generated based on their discoveries.

On 6 Apr. 2017, the 2016 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. U.S. Commissioner for Patents, Andrew H. Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

“I look forward to welcoming and honoring the 2016 class of Fellows to Boston in April,” said Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering at Northeastern University and NAI Fellow. “The NAI has once again unveiled a prolific group of academic inventors who produce vitally important discoveries for the betterment of society.”

“With each year I continue to be amazed by the caliber of individuals named as NAI Fellows and the 2016 class is no exception,” said U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld. “Congratulations to this very deserving group of distinguished academic innovators. I was honored to once again serve as a member of the Fellows Selection Committee and look forward to recognizing this new group of innovative leaders at the induction ceremony this spring.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow are named inventors on U.S. patents and were nominated by their peers for outstanding contributions to innovation in areas such as patents and licensing, innovative discovery and technology, significant impact on society, and support and enhancement of innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in The Chronicle of Higher Education 20 Jan. 2017 issue, and in upcoming issues of Inventors Digest and NAI journal Technology and Innovation.

The 2016 NAI Fellows were evaluated by the 2016 Selection Committee included 19 members, comprising NAI Fellows, recipients of U.S. National Medals, National Inventors Hall of Fame inductees, members of the National Academies and senior officials from the USPTO, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Association of American Universities, American Association for the Advancement of Science, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, Association of University Technology Managers, and National Inventors Hall of Fame, among other organizations.

“It is exciting to see the NAI Fellows Program continue to grow and honor the world’s most impactful academic inventors each year,” said NAI President Paul R. Sanberg. “The 2016 Fellows exude innovative excellence and we feel truly privileged to welcome them to the Academy and recognize their remarkable contributions to discovery and invention.”

2016 Elected NAI Fellows

  • David Akopian, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Kamal S. Ali, Jackson State University
  • A. Paul Alivisatos, University of California, Berkeley
  • Carl R. Alving, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Hamid Arastoopour, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Peter Arsenault, Tufts University
  • B. Jayant Baliga, North Carolina State University
  • Zhenan Bao, Stanford University
  • Richard G. Baraniuk, Rice University
  • Francis Barany, Cornell University
  • Jean-Marie Basset, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Paula J. Bates, University of Louisville
  • Craig C. Beeson, Medical University of South Carolina
  • K. Darrell Berlin, Oklahoma State University
  • Sarit B. Bhaduri, The University of Toledo
  • Pallab K. Bhattacharya, University of Michigan
  • Dieter H. Bimberg, Technical University of Berlin, Germany
  • Christopher N. Bowman, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Barbara D. Boyan, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Mindy M. Brashears, Texas Tech University
  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Ruben G. Carbonell, North Carolina State University
  • John F. Carpenter, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Raghunath V. Chaudhari, The University of Kansas
  • Liang-Gee Chen, National Taiwan University, Taiwan
  • Junhong Chen, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Simon R. Cherry, University of California, Davis
  • Michael J. Cima, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Adrienne E. Clarke, La Trobe University, Australia
  • Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Rita R. Colwell, University of Maryland
  • Diane J. Cook, Washington State University
  • Peter A. Crooks, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
  • Riccardo Dalla-Favera, Columbia University
  • Suman Datta, University of Notre Dame
  • Delbert E. Day, Missouri University of Science and Technology
  • Roger A. de la Torre, University of Missouri
  • Stephen W. Director, Northeastern University
  • Jeffrey L. Duerk, Case Western Reserve University
  • James L. Dye, Michigan State University
  • Richard L. Ehman, Mayo Clinic
  • Gary A. Eiceman, New Mexico State University
  • Ali Emadi, McMaster University, Canada
  • Ronald M. Evans, Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  • Stanley Falkow, Stanford University
  • Hany Farid, Dartmouth College
  • Shane M. Farritor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Philippe M. Fauchet, Vanderbilt University
  • Denise L. Faustman, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • David R. Fischell, Cornell University
  • Vincent A. Fischetti, The Rockefeller University
  • David P. Fries, Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition
  • Kenneth G. Furton, Florida International University
  • Kanad Ghose, Binghamton University, SUNY
  • Juan E. Gilbert, University of Florida
  • Linda C. Giudice, University of California, San Francisco
  • Herbert Gleiter, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany
  • Dan M. Goebel, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Forouzan Golshani, California State University, Long Beach
  • Lorne M. Golub, Stony Brook University, SUNY
  • John B. Goodenough, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael Graetzel, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Robert J. Greenberg, Alfred E. Mann Foundation for Scientific Research
  • Richard M. Greenwald, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick G. Halbur, Iowa State University
  • Henry R. Halperin, Johns Hopkins University
  • Amy E. Herr, University of California, Berkeley
  • D. Craig Hooper, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Edward A. Hoover, Colorado State University
  • Oliver Yoa-Pu Hu, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan
  • David Huang, Oregon Health & Science University
  • Mark S. Humayun, University of Southern California
  • Joseph P. Iannotti, Cleveland Clinic
  • Enrique Iglesia, University of California, Berkeley
  • Sungho Jin, University of California, San Diego
  • Barry W. Johnson, University of Virginia
  • William L. Johnson, California Institute of Technology
  • John L. Junkins, Texas A&M University
  • Michelle Khine, University of California, Irvine
  • John Klier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Thomas J. Kodadek, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Harold L. Kohn, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Steven M. Kuznicki, University of Alberta, Canada
  • Enrique J. Lavernia, University of California, Irvine
  • Nicholas J. Lawrence, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  • Leslie A. Leinwand, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Frances S. Ligler, North Carolina State University
  • Yilu Liu, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Jennifer K. Lodge, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Mandi J. Lopez, Louisiana State University
  • Gabriel P. López, The University of New Mexico
  • Surya K. Mallapragada, Iowa State University
  • Seth R. Marder, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Alan G. Marshall, Florida State University
  • Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation-India
  • Kouki Matsuse, Meiji University, Japan
  • Martin M. Matzuk, Baylor University
  • T. Dwayne McCay, Florida Institute of Technology
  • James W. McGinity, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Thomas J. Meade, Northwestern University
  • Katrina L. Mealey, Washington State University
  • Edward W. Merrill, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Paul L. Modrich, Duke University
  • David J. Mooney, Harvard University
  • H. Keith Moo-Young, Washington State University Tri-Cities
  • Israel J. Morejon, University of South Florida
  • Harold L. Moses, Vanderbilt University
  • Joseph R. Moskal, Northwestern University
  • Nazim Z. Muradov, University of Central Florida
  • Nicholas Muzyczka, University of Florida
  • Lakshmi S. Nair, University of Connecticut
  • Shrikanth S. Narayanan, University of Southern California
  • Ellen Ochoa, NASA Johnson Space Center
  • Erin K. O’Shea, Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  • Francis A. Papay, Cleveland Clinic
  • Kevin J. Parker, University of Rochester
  • Yvonne J. Paterson, University of Pennsylvania
  • George N. Pavlakis, National Institutes of Health
  • Kenneth H. Perlin, New York University
  • Nasser Peyghambarian, The University of Arizona
  • Gary A. Piazza, University of South Alabama
  • Christophe Pierre, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Michael C. Pirrung, University of California, Riverside
  • Michael V. Pishko, University of Wyoming
  • Garth Powis, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  • Paras N. Prasad, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ronald T. Raines, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Ragunathan (Raj) Rajkumar, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Michael P. Rastatter, East Carolina University
  • Jacob Richter, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
  • Richard E. Riman, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Andrew G. Rinzler, University of Florida
  • Bruce E. Rittmann, Arizona State University
  • Nabeel A. Riza, University College Cork, Ireland
  • Kenneth J. Rothschild, Boston University
  • Stuart H. Rubin, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center
  • Linda J. Saif, The Ohio State University
  • Sudeep Sarkar, University of South Florida
  • John T. Schiller, National Institutes of Health
  • Diane G. Schmidt, University of Cincinnati
  • Wayne S. Seames, University of North Dakota
  • Michael S. Shur, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
  • David Sidransky, Johns Hopkins University
  • Mrityunjay Singh, Ohio Aerospace Institute
  • Kamalesh K. Sirkar, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • David R. Smith, Duke University
  • James E. Smith, West Virginia University
  • Terrance P. Snutch, The University of British Columbia, Canada
  • Ponisseril Somasundaran, Columbia University
  • Gerald Sonnenfeld, The University of Rhode Island
  • James S. Speck, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sidlgata V. Sreenivasan, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Bruce W. Stillman, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Daniele C. Struppa, Chapman University
  • Kenneth S. Suslick, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Mark J. Suto, Southern Research Institute
  • Yu-Chong Tai, California Institute of Technology
  • Nelson Tansu, Lehigh University
  • Fleur T. Tehrani, California State University, Fullerton
  • Marc T. Tessier-Lavigne, Stanford University
  • Madhukar (Mathew) L. Thakur, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Mehmet Toner, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Jan T. Vilcek, New York University
  • Anil V. Virkar, The University of Utah
  • John F. Wager, Oregon State University
  • William R. Wagner, University of Pittsburgh
  • Isiah M. Warner, Louisiana State University
  • John D. Weete, Auburn University
  • Andrew M. Weiner, Purdue University
  • Ralph Weissleder, Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Thomas M. Weller, University of South Florida
  • Jennifer L. West, Duke University
  • Amnon Yariv, California Institute of Technology
  • Yun Yen, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan
  • Warren M. Zapol, Massachusetts General Hospital

TOP 100 WORLDWIDE UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS FOR 2015 ANNOUNCED

NAI and IPO Release Report on Top University Patent Holders for Fourth Time

TAMPA, Fla. (Jul. 12, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2015. The report utilizes data acquired from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO have published the report annually since 2013. The rankings are compiled by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent.

“The rate at which our universities are producing groundbreaking technologies is growing faster than ever and it is an honor to recognize these institutions for their amazing work,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We thank the IPO for collaborating with the NAI for the fourth year in a row on this ranking which confirms the importance of supporting research and innovation within academia.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, The University of Texas, Tsinghua University (China), California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, and University of Michigan.

“IPO is proud to once again release this important report with the NAI to highlight the tremendous work in patents being done at universities,” said IPO Executive Director, Mark W. Lauroesch. “Inventive ecosystems continue to grow around universities, sparking a culture in which academics and innovation go hand-in-hand producing technologies which stimulate not only local and regional economies but the global economy.”

IPO’s 33rd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2015 was also recently released. The top 10 universities on the 2015 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2015 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS SIGN MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH US PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

NAI and USPTO officials signed agreement during NAI’s Fifth Annual Conference

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (April 26, 2016) – Russell Slifer, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and deputy director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and Paul Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI), signed a Memorandum of Agreement during the NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony, the closing event for the NAI’s fifth annual conference on April 15, 2016.

The agreement outlines the opportunity for the USPTO and the NAI to work closely on mutually beneficial projects to enrich education outreach, honors and awards, and programs relating to intellectual property. The agreement includes a commitment from the NAI to host its annual meeting every other year at USPTO headquarters.

“It has been our pleasure at the USPTO, for the last five years to have a relationship with the Academy and it is my pleasure also to sign our Memorandum of Agreement,” said Slifer. “We will continue to cooperate to host events and awards. The NAI annual meeting will continue to be held here every other year, which will allow for our employees to meet with NAI members and Fellows to discuss how the work they are doing comes together to help the nation and innovators around the world.”

David Kappos, former Under Secretary of Commerce and previous director of the USPTO, embraced the NAI soon after it was founded in 2010 and suggested the need for a higher level program for leading academic inventors to be honored and recognized for their contributions to society.

In his speech at the 2012 NAI annual meeting in Tampa, Kappos said, “The NAI is a breakthrough for our country. It couldn’t be more timely to have an organization like this to be championing innovation.”

“We are very grateful that the USPTO has provided vital support to the NAI since our inception,” said Sanberg. “We are pleased to announce the signing of this Memorandum of Agreement which solidifies our important friendship and we look forward to a bright future of collaborations.”

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FELLOWS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS INDUCTED AT UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE

2015 keynote speech provided by U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 21, 2016) – U.S. Commissioner for Patents Andrew H. Hirshfeld provided the keynote address for the induction ceremony of the 2015 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors at the NAI’s fifth annual conference, held this year in Washington D.C. on Apr. 14-15.

Over 325 inventors and academic leaders attended the conference, which featured presentations and panels by more than 30 distinguished scientists and innovators including keynote addresses by Victor J. Dzau, President of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow; Cristin A. Dorgelo, Chief of Staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy; and Emery N. Brown, MIT Professor and NAI Fellow.

“It was an honor to participate in the NAI’s fifth annual meeting as a featured speaker,” said Brown. “The NAI fills a vital need by bringing together innovators from across disciplines to be recognized for their groundbreaking contributions in research, patents and commercialization. I am honored to be a Fellow of this important national organization.”

At the ceremony held on Apr. 15 at the USPTO, Hirshfeld and Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI and Charter Fellow, presented the 2015 class of Fellows with a trophy, medal and rosette pin honoring their contributions as academic inventors. Of the 168 innovators elected to the 2015 class, more than 130 were in attendance.

“I am personally inspired and grateful to be amongst this distinguished group and join in recognizing you today,” said Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, during his keynote address. “You have truly enhanced the quality of life for our nation and we thank you for your innovative contributions. As inventive researchers who are leaders in all fields of academia, we are eager to learn from your expertise and collaborate on future educational initiatives.”

The NAI Fellows Program has 582 Fellows worldwide representing more than 190 prestigious universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions. Collectively, the Fellows hold more than 20,000 issued U.S. patents.

The collective NAI Fellows now include more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the three branches of the National Academy of Sciences, 27 Nobel Laureates, 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 36 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 14 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows among other awards and distinctions.

“I am honored to be inducted into the National Academy of Inventors,” said Illinois Institute of Technology President Alan W. Cramb. “Being named in the same category as other globally distinguished innovators and inventors in the NAI is a privilege.”

Nominations for 2016 Fellows will open Jul. 1 and can be submitted online through Oct. 1 at AcademyofInventors.org. The 2016 Fellows will be inducted and honored at the 2017 NAI Annual Conference, to be held April 6-7, 2017 in Boston, Massachusetts.

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U.S. COMMISSIONER FOR PATENTS, NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE PRESIDENT SPEAK AT NAI CONFERENCE

The 5th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 14-15 in Washington D.C.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (April 11, 2016) – The National Academy of Inventors will celebrate its fifth annual conference by returning to Washington, D.C., Apr. 14-15, 2016. The conference will feature keynote speeches by Andrew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents and Victor Dzau, president of the National Academy of Medicine and NAI Fellow.

The theme of the NAI’s fifth conference is “Building on Foundations of Innovation” to explore the interaction between the United States’ history of change and the modern culture and leadership of innovation.

Keynote speeches by Cristin Dorgelo, chief of staff for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and Emery Brown, professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and NAI Fellow, along with presentations and panels on innovation by more than 35 prolific scientists and academic leaders, round out the conference program.

Highlights also include a signature gala at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History and the induction of the 2015 Fellows of the NAI—the conference’s closing event—at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, with a keynote address by Hirshfeld.

“It is a pleasure to commemorate the Academy’s milestone fifth annual meeting by welcoming the NAI back to Washington,” said Hirshfeld. “I look forward to recognizing the new distinguished class of NAI Fellows. These true champions of academic invention have made tremendous contributions to society through their amazing innovations.”

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NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2015 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators honored with prestigious distinction

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 15, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 168 leaders of invention and innovation to Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 582, representing over 190 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2015 Fellows account for 5,368 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 20,000.

Included among all NAI Fellows are more than 80 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 310 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, NAM), 27 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 32 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science, 27 Nobel Laureates, 14 Lemelson-MIT Prize recipients, 170 AAAS Fellows, and 98 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on 15 Apr. 2016, as part of the Fifth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). USPTO Commissioner for Patents Andrew Hirshfeld will provide the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, medal, and rosette pin.

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2015 Elected NAI Fellows

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, The Univ. of Texas at San Antonio
  • Dean P. Alderucci, The University of Chicago
  • Jayakrishna Ambati, University of Kentucky
  • Iver E. Anderson, Iowa State University
  • Kristi S. Anseth, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Allen W. Apblett, Oklahoma State University
  • Charles J. Arntzen, Arizona State University
  • Harry A. Atwater, Jr., California Inst. of Technology
  • Lorne A. Babiuk, University of Alberta
  • John M. Ballato, Clemson University
  • John S. Baras, University of Maryland
  • Issa Batarseh, University of Central Florida
  • Ray H. Baughman, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Angela M. Belcher, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Stephen J. Benkovic, The Pennsylvania State Univ.
  • Shekhar Bhansali, Florida International University
  • Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • John D. Birdwell, The Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Kenneth J. Blank, Rowan University
  • Dale L. Boger, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Charles A. Bouman, Purdue University
  • John E. Bowers, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Gary L. Bowlin, University of Memphis
  • C. Jeffrey Brinker, The University of New Mexico
  • Richard B. Brown, The University of Utah
  • Emery N. Brown, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Milton L. Brown, Georgetown University
  • Steven R.J. Brueck, The University of New Mexico
  • Joe C. Campbell, University of Virginia
  • Selim A. Chacour, University of South Florida
  • Mau-Chung Frank Chang, Nat. Chiao Tung Univ.
  • Shu Chien, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Diana S. Chow, University of Houston
  • Chung K. (David) Chu, University of Georgia
  • Yoginder P. Chugh, Southern Illinois University
  • William J. Clancey, IHMC
  • Katrina Cornish, The Ohio State University
  • Delos M. (Toby) Cosgrove III, Cleveland Clinic
  • Alan W. Cramb, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Benjamin F. Cravatt III, The Scripps Research Inst.
  • Roy Curtiss III, University of Florida
  • Paul D. Dapkus, University of Southern California
  • John G. Daugman, University of Cambridge
  • Mark E. Davis, California Institute of Technology
  • Robert C. Dean, Jr., Dartmouth College
  • Atam P. Dhawan, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Duane B. Dimos, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • David M. Eddy, University of South Florida
  • Nader Engheta, University of Pennsylvania
  • Antonio Facchetti, Northwestern University
  • Rudolf Faust, University of Massachusetts Lowell
  • Robert E. Fischell, University of Maryland
  • Christodoulos A. Floudas, Texas A&M University
  • Gabor Forgacs, University of Missouri
  • Scott E. Fraser, University of Southern California
  • Jean M.J. Fréchet, KAUST
  • Richard H. Frenkiel, Rutgers University
  • Sanjiv S. Gambhir, Stanford University
  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, University of Missouri
  • Sir Andre K. Geim, The University of Manchester
  • George Georgiou, The University of Texas at Austin
  • John C. Gore, Vanderbilt University
  • Venu Govindaraju, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • Ali Hajimiri, California Inst. of Technology
  • Naomi J. Halas, Rice University
  • Andrew D. Hamilton, University of Oxford
  • Wayne W. Hanna, University of Georgia
  • Florence P. Haseltine, National Institutes of Health
  • Charlotte A.E. Hauser, KAUST
  • Craig J. Hawker, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • M. Frederick Hawthorne, University of Missouri
  • Barton F. Haynes, Duke University
  • Richard F. Heck, University of Delaware
  • Andrew B. Holmes, The University of Melbourne
  • Rush D. Holt, AAAS
  • H. Robert Horvitz, Mass. Institute of Technology
  • Chenming C. Hu, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Leon D. Iasemidis, Louisiana Tech University
  • Mir Imran, University of Pittsburgh
  • Donald E. Ingber, Harvard University
  • Chennupati Jagadish, The Australian National Univ.
  • Anil K. Jain, Michigan State University
  • Kristina M. Johnson, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Joseph S. Kalinowski, East Carolina University
  • Aaron V. Kaplan, Dartmouth College
  • Usha N. Kasid, Georgetown University
  • Kenneth W. Kinzler, Johns Hopkins University
  • Brian K. Kobilka, Stanford University
  • Steven J. Kubisen, The George Washington Univ.
  • Donald W. Landry, Columbia University
  • Se-Jin Lee, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sunggyu Lee, Ohio University
  • Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke University
  • G. Douglas Letson, Moffitt Cancer & Research Inst.
  • Jennifer A. Lewis, Harvard University
  • Guifang Li, University of Central Florida
  • James C. Liao, Univ. of California, Los Angeles
  • John S. (Pete) Lollar III, Emory University
  • Anthony M. Lowman, Rowan University
  • Rodney S. Markin, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center
  • Tobin J. Marks, Northwestern University
  • Dean F. Martin, University of South Florida
  • Helen S. Mayberg, Emory University
  • Patrick L. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Edith G. McGeer, The University of British Columbia
  • Meyya Meyyappan, NASA Ames Research Center
  • Thomas E. Milner, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Umesh K. Mishra, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Somenath Mitra, New Jersey Inst. of Technology
  • Andreas F. Molisch, University of Southern California
  • Ramani Narayan, Michigan State University
  • Alan C. Nelson, Arizona State University
  • Kyriacos C. Nicolaou, Rice University
  • David R. Nygren, The Univ. of Texas at Arlington
  • Richard M. Osgood, Jr., Columbia University
  • Alyssa Panitch, Purdue University
  • Heloise A. Pereira, OUHSC
  • William M. Pierce, Jr., University of Louisville
  • John M. Poate, Colorado School of Mines
  • H. Vincent, Poor, Princeton University
  • Ann Progulske-Fox, University of Florida
  • Suzie H. Pun, University of Washington
  • Kaushik Rajashekara, The Univ. of Texas at Dallas
  • Jahangir S. Rastegar, Stony Brook University
  • A. Hari Reddi, Univ. of California, Davis
  • E. Albert Reece, University of Maryland
  • Kenneth L. Reifsnider, The Univ. of TX at Arlington
  • Jasper D. Rine, Univ. of California, Berkeley
  • Ajeet Rohatgi, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Stephen D. Russell, SPAWAR
  • Michael J. Sailor, Univ. of California, San Diego
  • Bahgat G. Sammakia, Binghamton University
  • Andrew V. Schally, University of Miami
  • Paul R. Schimmel, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Peter G. Schultz, The Scripps Research Institute
  • Marlan O. Scully, Texas A&M University
  • Jonathan L. Sessler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin
  • Mohsen Shahinpour, University of Maine
  • Benjamin A. Shneiderman, University of Maryland
  • Marvin J. Slepian, The University of Arizona
  • Kwok-Fai So, The University of Hong Kong
  • Richard A. Soref, Univ. of Massachusetts Boston
  • Pramod K. Srivastava, University of Connecticut
  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati
  • Valentino J. Stella, The University of Kansas
  • Galen D. Stucky, Univ. of California, Santa Barbara
  • Bala Subramaniam, The University of Kansas
  • R. Michael Tanner, APLU
  • Guillermo J. Tearney, Harvard University
  • Stephen Tomlinson, Medical Univ. of South Carolina
  • James M. Tour, Rice University
  • Kalliat T. Valsaraj, Louisiana State University
  • Bert Vogelstein, Johns Hopkins University
  • Sherry L. Voytik-Harbin, Purdue University
  • Norman J. Wagner III, University of Delaware
  • Yong Wang, Washington State University
  • James A. Wells, Univ. of California, San Francisco
  • Jay F. Whitacre, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Caroline C. Whitacre, The Ohio State University
  • Helena S. Wisniewski, Univ. of Alaska Anchorage
  • Edward D. Wolf, Cornell University
  • Paul K. Wright, University of California, Berkeley
  • James C. Wyant, The University of Arizona
  • Pan-Chyr Yang, National Taiwan University
  • Yu-Dong Yao, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Martin L. Yarmush, Rutgers University
  • Jim P. Zheng, Florida State University

NAI AND IPO RELEASE TOP 100 UNIVERSITIES GRANTED U.S. PATENTS

National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association Announce Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Patents Rankings

TAMPA, Fla. (June 16, 2015) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO) have announced the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2014. The report, published annually since 2013, utilizes data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to highlight the important role patents play in university research and innovation.

The NAI and IPO compile the rankings each year by calculating the number of utility patents granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office which list a university as the first assignee on the printed patent. The full report of the Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted Patents in 2014 can be found at www.academyofinventors.org/pdf/NAI-IPO-Top-100-Universities-2014.pdf

The top 15 universities worldwide ranked include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University (China), Stanford University, University of Texas, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF), Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Michigan, National Tsing Hua University (Taiwan), Korea Institute of Science Technology, University of South Florida, University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute of Microelectronics of Chinese Academy of Science.

“The NAI is delighted to be releasing this list of the leading innovative universities in the world in conjunction with the IPO for the third year in a row,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “The data once again proves that innovation based on university technology continues to be a key factor in economic development and a fundamental element to the success of a university.”

In conjunction, the IPO will soon be releasing their 32nd consecutive annual Top 300 Patent Owners list of organizations worldwide that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2014. The top 13 universities on the 2014 Top 100 Universities list also appear in the 2014 Top 300 Patent Owners list.

“Patents make enormous contributions to U.S innovation, leading to more jobs in U.S. industry and new strength in the economy,” said IPO Executive Director Herbert C. Wamsley. “These innovations help solidify the transfer of cutting-edge research to the marketplace, producing revenue and potentially increasing research funding by providing corporations and businesses the incentive to invest in university projects.”

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2014 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research, or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact: [email protected]

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF INVENTORS ANNOUNCES 2014 NAI FELLOWS

Academic inventors and innovators elected to high honor

TAMPA, Fla. (Dec. 16, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 170 distinguished innovators to NAI Fellow status.

Those named today bring the total number of NAI Fellows to 414, representing more than 150 prestigious research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutions.

Included among all of the NAI Fellows are 61 presidents and senior leadership of research universities and non-profit research institutes, 208 members of the other National Academies (NAS, NAE, IOM), 21 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, 16 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation, 10 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Science, 21 Nobel Laureates, 11 Lemelson-MIT prize recipients, 112 AAAS Fellows, and 62 IEEE Fellows, among other awards and distinctions.

Collectively, the 414 NAI Fellows hold nearly 14,000 U.S. patents.

Election to NAI Fellow status is a high professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a highly prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

The NAI Fellows will be inducted on Mar. 20, 2015, as part of the 4th Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) Deputy Commissioner for Patent Operations Andrew Faile will be providing the keynote address for the induction ceremony. Fellows will be presented with a special trophy, newly designed medal, and rosette pin in honor of their outstanding accomplishments.

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NAI MEMBER INSTITUTIONS DOMINATE NSF I-CORPS TEAM AWARDS

Eight of the top 12 universities nationally are NAI members

TAMPA, Fla. (Nov. 25, 2014) – The National Academy of Inventors today recognized NAI Member Institutions with teams selected in 2014 for the Innovation Corps (I-Corps) Team program by the National Science Foundation. The 82 teams from NAI member universities comprise 54 percent of all teams nationwide receiving I-Corps Team awards this year.

Among the top 12 universities receiving the awards, eight are from NAI member universities, including, at #1, University of Michigan with 13 teams; #3, University of South Florida with five teams; #4, Carnegie-Mellon University with four teams; and tied for #5 with three teams each, Arizona State University, Florida State University, Lehigh University, University of Akron, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Nationally, 153 teams from 91 universities were selected for I-Corps Team awards in 2014. Each team receives a $50,000 grant and participates in an I-Corps Teams curriculum designed to provide hands-on, immersive learning for researchers on what it takes to successfully transition research out of the laboratory into commercially feasible products that benefit society.

“We are proud our Member Institutions are leading the way in this groundbreaking program.” said Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, president of the National Academy of Inventors and a AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador. “Their work contributes to economic prosperity in their communities, states and our nation.”

The National Science Foundation (NSF) established the I-Corps Teams program to identify NSF-funded researchers, and provide them mentoring and funding in order to accelerate the translation of knowledge derived from fundamental research into emerging products and services.

“This is a powerful economic development initiative by the NSF,” said Dr. Sethuraman Panchanathan, senior vice president in the Office of Knowledge Enterprise Development at Arizona State University, one of the top 12 universities receiving awards this year. “The I-Corps Team program is designed to create a national innovation ecology and will have a high impact.”

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NAI member institutions receiving NSI I-Corps Team Awards in 2014

Arizona State University

Auburn University

Boise State University

Carnegie-Mellon University

Colorado State University

Columbia University

Cornell University

Drexel University

Florida International University

Florida State University

Lehigh University

Louisiana Tech University

Missouri University of Science and Technology

New Mexico State University

New York University

Ohio State University

Oklahoma State University

Purdue University

Rutgers University New Brunswick

Stevens Institute of Technology

SUNY at Buffalo

SUNY at Stony Brook

Temple University

Texas Tech University

University of Akron

University of Arizona

University of California-Berkeley

University of California-Davis

University of Cincinnati Main Campus

University of Florida

University of Georgia Research Foundation Inc

University of Houston

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

University of Kentucky Research Foundation

University of Maryland College Park

University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Michigan Ann Arbor

University of North Texas

University of South Carolina at Columbia

University of South Florida

University of Toledo

University of Wisconsin-Madison

WHY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER BRINGS UNIVERSITIES
‘MORE THAN MONEY’

Many benefits of tech transfer to universities beyond revenues from licenses & royalties

TAMPA, Fla. (June 26, 2014) – Academic technology transfer – the process of moving research from the lab to the market – provides intrinsic benefits to universities that go far beyond any potential revenues from licenses and royalties.

So say the authors, from five universities across the country and the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM), in a new article from the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) that appears in the current issue of Technology and Innovation and is available Open Access.

“More than Money: The Exponential Impact of Academic Technology Transfer” is the work of lead author Valerie Landrio McDevitt, former associate vice president at the University of South Florida (USF) and current executive director of AUTM, and co-authors, Joelle Mendez-Hinds of USF, David Winwood of the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Vinit Nijhawan of Boston University (BU), Todd Sherer of Emory University, John F. Ritter of Princeton University, and Paul R. Sanberg of USF and the NAI. USF, UAB, BU and Emory are all Charter Member Institutions of the NAI.

According to the authors, the positive benefits of technology transfer for universities can be significant, including: a vibrant culture of entrepreneurship that promotes recruitment and retention of faculty, increased student success through participation in real world research, public benefits from applied research that seeks to address global challenges, economic development, increased opportunities for funding through inter-institutional and interdisciplinary grants, new start-ups and international research relationships, and increased prestige and fundraising from a stronger university brand.

“In the academic setting, technology transfer is a critical component for facilitating and sparking innovation within universities and helping to connect universities with commercial partners in the community,” says co-author Paul R. Sanberg, who is founder and president of the NAI. “Technology transfer can be truly transformational to a university and to the community.”

The authors:

Valerie Landrio McDevitt, a registered patent attorney, is executive director of the Association of University Technology Manager (AUTM). She received her J.D. at Emory University School of Law. Prior to joining AUTM, she served as the associate vice president for technology transfer and business incubation at the University of South Florida. She previously worked as a science advisor with a House subcommittee in Washington, D.C., and participated in the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellowship program.

Joelle Mendez-Hinds is a patent marketing intern in the Technology Transfer Office/Division of Patents & Licensing at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

David Winwood is chief executive officer of the University of Alabama at Birmingham Research Foundation and senior associate vice president for Economic Development and Innovation Alliances. Prior to joining UAB, Winwood served North Carolina State University and The Ohio State University. He is a member of the U.S. Council on Competitiveness Regional Innovation Initiative Expert Committee and serves on boards of directors for the Council on Governmental Relations, Biotechnology Association of Alabama, Birmingham Venture Club, Innovation Depot, and TechBirmingham.

Vinit Nijhawan, is managing director of the Office of Technology Development and director of Enterprise Programs at the Institute of Technology at Boston University, Entrepreneurship & Commercialization (ITEC) at BU. He received his B.A.Sc. in electrical engineering from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. He has more than twenty-five years of experience building five startups and was CEO of three of them. He is a member of the Board of Trustees of TiE Global, a non-profit that fosters entrepreneurship globally; special assistant to the vice president of research; and director of the Kindle Mentoring Program at BU.

Todd Sherer, is associate vice president for research administration and executive director of the Office of Technology Transfer at Emory University. He received his Ph.D. in toxicology at Washington State University. Prior to joining Emory, he was director of the Office of Technology and Research Collaborations at Oregon Health & Science University. He served as president of AUTM and is a registered patent agent with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

John F. Ritter, is director of the Office of Technology Licensing at Princeton University. Prior to joining Princeton, he served as a senior licensing professional at Rutgers University. He is secretary of the Review Panel on Conflict of Interest in Research. He received his J.D. from Rutgers School of Law and his M.B.A from Fairleigh Dickinson University.

Paul R. Sanberg, is senior vice president for research and innovation and Distinguished University Professor at the University of South Florida, and founder and president of the National Academy of Inventors. He is an inventor on over 30 licensed health-related U.S. patents and a highly cited author with more than 600 publications. He is a Fellow of the AAAS, NAI, Royal Societies (Medicine, Chemistry and Public Health), AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador, and serves on the evaluation committee of the National Medal of Technology and Innovation for the U.S. Department of Commerce.

Innovating for the Future–Mindsets and Skillsets

Technology & Innovation Journal graphic for Volume 1, Issue 1. Image contains a woman wearing pink in an omni directional wheelchair. Text reads "21.1 Available Now. Photo Credit: Tom Kramer" and contains the NAI logo in the bottom right corner.

Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

Academic Discovery: The Story Before the Headlines

New video sheds light on the Mizzou scientists and the story behind plant-based protein.

 

Columbia, Mo. (Oct. 16, 2019) –The National Academy of Inventors (NAI), which supports innovation at learning institutes, has partnered with the University of Missouri (MU) to offer a rare glimpse behind the academic curtain of scientific discovery.

In a co-produced video, From Campus to Commerce, NAI and MU share the little-known story of how scientists Fu-Hung Hsieh and Harold Huff created a plant-based meat alternative in the MU College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources in 2010.

That innovation led to the creation of the market-hit Beyond Meat, a start-up company founded in 2009 that supplies meat-alternative protein products sold to a variety of restaurants and stores such as McDonald’s, Dunkin’ and most recently, KFC.

The video debuted today at Beyond Innovation, an annual faculty recognition event — highlighting faculty with new patents, licensed technologies and startups — hosted by MU Chancellor Alexander N. Cartwright, NAI Fellow, and Vice Chancellor for Research Mark A. McIntosh. NAI chose MU to host today’s kickoff on its main campus due to the university’s past successes in supporting early-stage innovations

“This discovery in our labs was significant because it leverages plant-based proteins and simultaneously addresses the global demand for food,” said Cartwright. “In addition to being a key part of a major startup company, this is just another example of how MU is changing the world. We are proud to help launch this national campaign to make the public even more aware of the groundbreaking research and innovation that occurs every day at the University of Missouri as part of our mission to serve society.”

NAI Board Member and Fellow, Robert Duncan, Ph.D. participated at the innovation event to offer insight on NAI and MU’s partnership as well as the reason for the campaign’s genesis. “NAI’s mission is to inspire, encourage and honor academic discovery at our member institutions. These scientists, like Hsieh and Huff, are visionaries working away in labs to uncover solutions to some of the most challenging issues facing society today,”

“While the public knows about the commercial product that resulted from our scientists’ work, the lesser known story is the fundamental research that was completed years before this was possible,” McIntosh said. “Every piece of technology, medical breakthrough and nutrition discovery starts with basic research inventions and innovations. Through persistence from our faculty and staff and with the important financial support from the public and investors, these technologies now are available in the marketplace.”

NAI plans to add more video ‘episodes’ to showcase similar work happening at other member institutions. “People benefit from early-discovery products every day,” Duncan offered, “But they don’t know anything about the scientists who created it. The world needs to see where these solutions are coming from and give academics support to keep discovering. We want to give the public access to the discovery lab. We want to tell that story.”

See the video now: From Campus to Commerce, EP. 1

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

About the University of Missouri

Through research, learning, engagement and economic development, the University of Missouri (MU) creates solutions that solve the grand challenges facing Missouri and the world. A member of the prestigious Association of American Universities, MU translates the latest research into practical applications to improve people’s lives and grow Missouri’s economy. Mizzou has an estimated $3.9 billion impact on the Missouri economy and $210 million in annual research expenditures. As the state’s flagship university, MU has more than 300 degree programs and more than 30,000 students enrolled at Mizzou.

Exploring the Intersections of Academic InnovationSeventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors highlights academic inventors solving grand challenges of science, pushing the boundaries of innovation, and preparing the way for the next generation of inventors and innovators.

 

T&I graphic with a picture of a white man at a podium, speaking to a crowd. Text overlay reads "The Conference Issue: Exploring the Intersections of Innovation"

Tampa, Fla. (Aug. 12, 2019) –The new issue of Technology and Innovation, the open-access journal proudly published by the National Academy of Inventors (20:4) (full text) highlights papers from the Seventh Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI): “Exploring the Intersections of Innovation.” The NAI Annual Conference, held last year from April 4 to 6, 2018, in Washington, D.C., provides an annual forum for celebrating academic invention and inventors, recognizing and encouraging invention, and enhancing the visibility of university and non-profit research. This issue contains a special conference section that includes articles by speakers and panelists at the 2018 NAI Annual Conference and a general section that includes an NAI Fellow Profile featuring Jennifer Doudna.

“This past year’s conference and this issue of T&I recognize that innovation is complex and exists in a dynamic interplay of relationships – including the intersection of innovation and the future; the intersection of ideas and entrepreneurship; and the intersection of academia, government, and industry,” said Dr. Paul Sanberg, president of the NAI and editor-in-chief of T&I.

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 Announced

The National Academy of Inventors and the Intellectual Property Owners Association have announced their seventh annual report on trends within academic patenting.

Tampa, Fla. (June 4, 2019) –The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents in 2018 has been announced by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO). The report is created using data from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and it highlights the vital role patents play in university research and innovation.

This report, published annual since 2013 by the NAI and IPO, ranks the top 100 universities named as the first assignee on utility patents granted by the USPTO in the 2018 calendar year. The full report can be found on Ingenta, where the NAI publishes its multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation. It is also available on the NAI website.

“The patents our universities produce represent important processes and collaborations which have the potential to make a significant impact on society on a local, regional, national and global scale,” said Paul R. Sanberg, president of the NAI. “We are honored to partner with the IPO in recognizing the top academic patent holders through this report for the seventh consecutive year.”

The top 10 ranked universities worldwide in 2018 include: The University of California System, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, The University of Texas System, California Institute of Technology, Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and, tied for tenth, Arizona State University and University of Michigan.

“Patenting an invention is the first step towards making a lasting impact on the innovation ecosystem,” said Jessica Landacre, Deputy Executive Director of the IPO. “The Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents demonstrates which institutions are at the forefront of this change, and highlights the important role innovation plays in local, regional and global economies.”

The NAI is excited to welcome 11 new institutions to the rankings this year. The incredible innovations represented by these awarded patents span a wide variety of fields, such as memory enhancement, wireless charging, treatments for alzheimer’s and other tauopathies and more. IPO’s Top 300 list of organizations that received the most U.S. utility patents during 2018 will be released for the 36th consecutive time later this summer.

The information provided in this list is based on data obtained from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. For this report, a university is defined as an institution that grants undergraduate-level degrees. Patents reported are utility patents granted during the 2018 calendar year. When a patent is assigned to one or more entities, credit is given to the first named entity. The number of patents granted does not necessarily indicate the value of a university’s technology, the effectiveness of its research or whether its patents will be successfully licensed and/or brought to market. For inquiries, or if you have a research foundation that should be combined with your university assignment in the future, contact [email protected]

About the National Academy of Inventors

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, governmental and non-profit research institutes, and federal agencies with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010  to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

About the IPO

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (IPO), established in 1972, is a trade association for owners of patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets. IPO is the only association in the U.S. that serves all intellectual property owners in all industries and all fields of technology. IPO advocates for effective and affordable IP ownership rights and provides a wide array of services to members, including: supporting member interests relating to legislative and international issues; analyzing current IP issues; information and educational services; and disseminating information to the general public on the importance of intellectual property rights.

National Academy of Inventors to Bring Academic Leaders, Researchers and Thought Leaders together in Houston, TX for 2019 NAI Annual Meeting

The Eighth Annual Meeting of the National Academy of Inventors will take place Apr. 10-11.

Houston, TX (Apr. 9, 2019) – Approximately 400 members and constituents of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) will convene in Houston April 10-11 for the eighth Annual Meetingof the NAI. The meeting will feature keynote speeches by Maria Oden, Director of the Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen at Rice University; Walter Copan, Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology; Steven Sasson, University of South Florida and inventor of the digital camera; Ellen Ochoa, veteran astronaut and former director of the Johnson Space Center; and Drew Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents. The meeting will culminate with the 2019 NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony and Signature Gala at Space Center Houston.

The theme of the NAI’s eighth Annual Meeting is “Connecting the Innovation Community,” and the program features presentations on topics such as Industry, Academia and Government Collaborations, Connecting Disciplines to Explore Innovative Solutions and Insights for Future Innovation. Presenters include NAI members and Fellows along with university leaders and government officials.

“The Annual Meeting of the NAI is consistently a space of collaboration and inspiration where we can support and encourage academic inventors to pursue their loftiest goals,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Houston, home of the Johnson Space Center, is a vibrant hub of innovation, exploration and discovery, and the perfect place to recognize our incredible community. I look forward to two days of learning from and with our attendees, and honoring theoutstanding achievements of our members.”

The NAI will induct the new Fellow inducteess on April 11, 2019, in the Astronaut Gallery at Space Center Houston. Hirshfeld will deliver the keynote address at the ceremony.

“It is my distinct pleasure to attend the eighth Annual Meeting of the NAI, which promises to serve as the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored and cultivated,”Hirshfeld said. “The academy has continued to grow in pursuit of their mission in leading the conversation surrounding the innovation ecosystem’s impact on academia.I look forward to recognizing the newest class of NAI Fellows and the immeasurable impact theyhave made upon their communities.”

Collectively, the 1,060 NAI Fellows represent over 250 institutions worldwide. They hold more than 38,000 issued U.S. patents that have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and
created more than 36 million jobs. In addition, discoveries made by NAI Fellows have generated over $1.6 trillion in revenue.

Among all NAI Fellows, there are over 125 presidents and senior leaders of research universities,governmental and non-profit research institutes; 502 members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine; 40 inductees of the National Inventors Hall of Fame; 57 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 34 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

A detailed agenda is available here. Invited papers from the meeting will be published in the NAI’s multidisciplinary journal Technology & Innovation (T&I). To learn more about T&I, visit https://academyofinventors.org/ti-journal/.

About the National Academy of Inventors
The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 at the University of South Florida to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org

 

Advancing Invention Education and Creating the Next Generation of Innovators

Special topic issue explores cutting-edge educational programs that promote creativity and innovation, teach students to think like inventors, and prepare young people to solve real-world problems.

Tampa, Fla. (Apr. 1, 2019) – Arguably, nothing has a greater impact on society than invention. One need only imagine life without the printing press, the automobile, antibiotics or the computer to realize how invention impacts our lives in ways great and small. Despite the primacy of invention, efforts to actively support the development of young people as inventors are relatively new and the results of those efforts largely understudied. 

The latest issue of Technology and Innovation, Journal of the National Academy of Inventors®(20:3) (full text) seeks to remedy this lack of attention by focusing on the structure, execution and results of local and national invention education efforts from primary school through higher education. 

“These new instructional approaches respond to the need for creative problem solvers who draw on expertise from multiple disciplines, cultural knowledge and a diverse range of lived experiences to construct innovative solutions to real-world challenges,” said Dr. Stephanie Couch, executive director of Lemelson-MIT and co-editor of this special topic issue of T&I. “The growing dialogue about invention education assumes that the creativity and inventiveness needed to create new and novel, useful and unique solutions is something that can be nurtured and cultivated in people of all ages and from diverse walks of life.”

On the cover of this special topic issue on invention education, Andrei Iancu, Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), interacts with students at Camp Invention. Camp Invention, featured in the issue’s USPTO contribution, is the flagship invention education program run by the National Inventors Hall of Fame (NIHF).

This issue features articles by senior leaders at organizations such as Lemelson-MIT, NAI Fellows, and representatives from NAI Member Institutions, including: Boston CollegeGeorgia Institute of TechnologyMichigan State UniversityUniversity of California, IrvineUniversity of California, Santa Barbara; and University of South Florida.

The issue is divided into four sections.The first section, titled Program Designs for Developing Creativity and Inventiveness, features two articles that describe ways faculty are conceptualizing and designing new learning opportunities for college-age students. A third article in this section examines linkages among arts, crafts, design and patenting behavior.

The second section, Research Within Innovation Education Programs, defines what invention education consists of, examines ways of teaching as an invention educator and explores the implications of particular actions for student learning.

The third section is titled Theoretical and Epistemological Stances Underpinning Invention Education Programs. The article in this section describes the design and implementation of a developing Navy workforce program that incorporates many of the processes and practices employed by inventors.

The fourth and final section, Youth Action Researchers, makes visible the research finding of two high school students who have taken a reflexive stance by researching their own efforts to teach robotics to third graders.

In addition, this issue includes an article by the USPTO on the major invention education efforts of the National Inventors Hall of Fame, a profile of UCLA scientist and STEM education philanthropist Dr. Henry Samueli, NAI Fellow, and a spotlight on the University of South Florida’s National Academy of Inventors Chapter.

The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions worldwide. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multidisciplinary journal, Technology and Innovation. www.academyofinventors.org 

 

National Academy of Inventors Announces Inaugural Class of Senior Members

The NAI has elected 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of Senior Members, honoring them on National Inventors’ Day.

Tampa, Fla. (Feb. 11, 2019) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 66 academic inventors to the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members. The election of the inaugural class coincides with National Inventors’ Day, which this year marks what would have been Thomas Edison’s 172nd birthday and celebrates innovators and their contributions to society.

This inaugural class represents 37 NAI Member Institutions, including research universities, and governmental and non-profit research institutes. They are named inventors on over 1,100 issued U.S. patents.

Senior Members are active faculty, scientists and administrators at NAI Member Institutions with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization. They have produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society.

Senior Members also foster a spirit of innovation within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of inventors. The NAI aims to honor members’ achievements and contributions to the innovation ecosystem at their institutions.

“The election of the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members is a significant designation for a group of prolific inventors from NAI Member Institutions who are collectively a driving force in American innovation,” said Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President. “This is truly an accomplishment worth celebrating.”

NAI Senior Members undergo a two-step selection process, including internal NAI review and consideration by the Senior Member Advisory Committee. The committee comprises NAI members and other professionals considered pioneers in their respective fields.

“It was my honor to serve on the Advisory Committee for the inaugural class of NAI Senior Members,” said Walter Herbst, Fellow of the NAI. “This inaugural class of inventors marks the beginning of a singular program which will help further recognize academic inventors at every stage of their careers.” 

Senior Members are elected quarterly, with nominations accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations are currently being accepted for the Spring 2019 class of Senior Members. Access the nomination form on the NAI portal.  

The Senior Member Program provides an exclusive opportunity for NAI Member Institutions to honor their inventive faculty at every stage of their career. Universities interested in becoming an NAI Member Institution should contact Jayde Stewart at [email protected].

The complete list of NAI Senior Members is available on the NAI website.

The Inaugural Class of NAI Senior Members:

  • Khairul Alam, Ohio University
  • Norma Alcantar, University of South Florida
  • David R. Allee, Arizona State University
  • Supriyo Bandyopadhyay, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Sagnik Basuray, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Mark Benden, Texas A&M University
  • Irving Boime, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Ardeshir Bulsara, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • George Burba, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Eric Burger, Georgetown University
  • Bertrand Cambou, Northern Arizona University
  • Changyi Chen, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Shafiqul Chowdhury, Louisiana State University
  • Rongming Chu, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Mark Clarke, University of Houston
  • Douglas Covey, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Dominic D’Agostino, University of South Florida
  • Harbans Dhadwal, Stony Brook University
  • Christos Dimitrakopoulos, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Wadad Dubbelday, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Commands
  • Michael J. Escuti, North Carolina State University
  • Zhaoyang Fan, Texas Tech University
  • Robert Farrauto, Columbia University
  • Greg Fischer, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Swaroop Ghosh, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Noel Giebink, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Richard H. Gomer, Texas A&M University
  • David Gozal, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Jaime C. Grunlan, Texas A&M University
  • Sidney M. Hecht, Arizona State University
  • William E. Higgins, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Alex Hills, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Shuliang Jiao, Florida International University
  • Darren Johnson, University of Oregon
  • Michael Khonsari, Louisiana State University
  • Jeffrey D. Laskin, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Yanbin Li, University of Arkansas
  • Jianming Liang, Arizona State University
  • Duncan J. Maitland, Texas A&M University
  • Richard Miles, Texas A&M University
  • Subhra Mohapatra, University of South Florida
  • Thomas Nosker, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Keith D. Paulsen, Dartmouth College
  • Patrick J. Pinhero, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Gregory J. Pottie, University of California, Los Angeles
  • Samuel Prien, Texas Tech Health Sciences Center
  • Joanna Ptasinski, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Dong Chul “Jeffrey” Pyun, The University of Arizona
  • Hamed Reza Rahai, California State University, Long Beach
  • Dandina Rao, Louisiana State University
  • Kyle B. Reed, University of South Florida
  • Michael Roberts, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Stephen H. Safe, Texas A&M University
  • Hady Salloum, Stevens Institute of Technology
  • Wei-Chuan Shih, University of Houston
  • Wayne A. Shiroma, The University of Hawai’i
  • Andrew Stuart, East Carolina University
  • Hongmin Sun, University of Missouri-Columbia
  • Paul David Swanson, Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command
  • Nongjian Tao, Arizona State University
  • Yonhua Tzeng, Auburn University
  • Kenji Uchino, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Bennett Ward, Virginia Commonwealth University
  • Jon A. Weidanz, The University of Texas at Arlington
  • Douglas Werner, The Pennsylvania State University

National Academy of Inventors Announces 2018 Fellows

148 academic inventors were honored today with the esteemed distinction of NAI Fellow.

Tampa, Fla. (Dec. 11, 2018) – The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 148 renowned academic inventors to NAI Fellow status.

The 2018 class of Fellows represent 125 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes worldwide and are named inventors on nearly 4,000 issued U.S. patents. To date, there are over 1,000 NAI Fellows who have generated more than 11,000 licensed technologies and companies, created more than 1.4 million jobs, and generated over $190 billion in revenue.

Included among this year’s NAI Fellows are more than 25 presidents and senior leaders of research universities and non-profit research institutes; 5 recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology & Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science; and 3 Nobel Laureates, among other awards and distinctions.

Election to NAI Fellow status is the highest professional distinction accorded to academic inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society. The 2018 class of NAI Fellows has made an incredible impact in a variety of fields, including biomedical engineering, laser photonics and computer sciences.

“Congratulations to the 148 new members of the NAI Fellows program,” said Linda Hosler, Deputy Program Manager at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). “I had the honor of serving on the Fellows Selection Committee, and I am confident that this new class of Fellows will play a vital role in furthering the NAI’s mission and shining a light on the indispensable scientific and economic contributions of the world’s inventors.”

On Apr. 11, 2019, the 2018 NAI Fellows will be inducted as part of the Eighth NAI Annual Meeting in Houston, TX. Andrew Hirshfeld, USPTO Commissioner for Patents, will deliver the keynote address for the induction ceremony. In honor of their outstanding accomplishments, Fellows will receive a special trophy, medal and rosette pin.

“The National Academy of Inventors has elected an exceptional group of diverse inventors who have made an incredible impact on the innovation sphere on a global scale,” said Hirshfeld. “It was my distinct privilege to serve on the NAI Fellows Selection Committee and I look forward to celebrating with the NAI and the newly elected Fellows in April at the Space Center Houston.”

Those elected to the rank of NAI Fellow undergo a rigorous nomination and selection process. Once nominated by their peers, the 2018 class of NAI Fellows was evaluated by the 18 members of the 2018 Selection Committee, which encompassed NAI Fellows; U.S. National Medal recipients; AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassadors; senior officials from the USPTO, AUTM and the Smithsonian Lemelson Center; National Inventors Hall of Fame Inductees and board members; and members of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

“I am very proud to welcome another class of outstanding NAI Fellows, whose collective achievements have helped shape the future and who each day work to improve our world,” said Paul R. Sanberg, President of the NAI. “Each of these new NAI Fellows embody the Academy’s mission through their dedication, creativity, and inventive spirit. I look forward to working collaboratively with the new NAI Fellows in growing a global culture of innovation.”

The 2018 NAI Fellows will be highlighted with a full page announcement in the 25 Jan. 2019 issue of The Chronicle of Higher Education and in upcoming issues of Technology & Innovation.

The complete list of NAI Fellows is available on the NAI website.

2018 Elected NAI Fellows

  • Seth Y. Ablordeppey, Florida A&M University
  • Rafi Ahmed, Emory University
  • Pulickel M. Ajayan, Rice University
  • Rodney C. Alferness, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Emad S. Alnemri, Thomas Jefferson University
  • Hal S. Alper, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Evelina Angov, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research
  • Bernard P. Arulanandam, The University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Stephen F. Badylak, University of Pittsburgh
  • Harrison H. Barrett, The University of Arizona
  • Mark A. Barteau, Texas A&M University
  • Jacqueline K. Barton, California Institute of Technology
  • Susan J. Baserga, Yale University
  • Rashid Bashir, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Frank S. Bates, University of Minnesota
  • Michael Bishop, University of California, San Francisco
  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, University of California, San Francisco
  • Sylvia M. Blankenship, North Carolina State University
  • Robert E. Burrell, University of Alberta
  • Ahmed A. Busnaina, Northeastern University
  • Yihai Cao, Karolinska Institutet
  • Federico Capasso, Harvard University
  • Ni-Bin Chang, University of Central Florida
  • Constance J. Chang-Hasnain, University of California, Berkeley
  • Russell R. Chianelli, The University of Texas at El Paso
  • Young I. Cho, Drexel University
  • Sang H. Choi, NASA Langley Research Center
  • Chih-Chang Chu, Cornell University
  • Walter G. Copan, National Institute of Standards and Technology
  • Mark S. Cushman, Purdue University
  • Karl A. Deisseroth, Stanford University
  • Calum J. Drummond, RMIT University
  • Lawrence T. Drzal, Michigan State University
  • Igor R. Efimov, The George Washington University
  • Hesham M. El Gamal, The Ohio State University
  • Mary K. Estes, Baylor College of Medicine
  • Omid C. Farokhzad, Harvard University
  • Mauro Ferrari, Houston Methodist Research Institute
  • Alan S. Finkel, Monash University / Australia’s Chief Scientist
  • Jessica Fridrich, Binghamton University
  • Elaine V. Fuchs, The Rockefeller University
  • Judy L. Genshaft, University of South Florida
  • Durham Kenimer Giles, University of California, Davis
  • George T. Gillies, University of Virginia
  • Jay R. Goldberg, Marquette University
  • Jeffrey I. Gordon, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Craig J. Gotsman, New Jersey Institute of Technology
  • Linda G. Griffith, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • John L. Hall, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Tayyaba Hasan, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School
  • Gary M. Hieftje, Indiana University
  • Cynthia Hipwell, Texas A&M University
  • Dean Ho, National University of Singapore
  • Peter B. Høj, The University of Queensland
  • Robert A. Holton , Florida State University
  • Susan Band Horwitz, Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Matthew A. Howard, III, University of Iowa
  • Alex Qin Huang, The University of Texas at Austin
  • Shu-Yuen Ron Hui, The University of Hong Kong/Imperial College London
  • Bahram Javidi, University of Connecticut
  • Quanxi Jia, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York
  • Hongxing Jiang, Texas Tech University
  • Jingyue Ju, Columbia University
  • Kenneth Kaushansky, Stony Brook University
  • Pradeep K. Khosla, University of California, San Diego
  • Robert P. Kimberly, The University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Joseph W. Kloepper, Auburn University
  • Thomas L. Koch, The University of Arizona
  • Philip G. Koehler, University of Florida
  • Jindřich Kopeček, University of Utah
  • Sally Kornbluth, Duke University
  • William J. Koros, Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Adrian R. Krainer, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
  • Tei-Wei Kuo, National Taiwan University
  • Joshua LaBaer, Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University
  • Roger A. Laine, Louisiana State University and A&M College
  • Edmond J. LaVoie, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
  • Abraham P. Le