2016 Archive – NAI Fellows in the Press

  • Donald J. Buchsbaum, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology in the School of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Northwestern University scientists Thomas J. Meade and Joseph R. Moskal have been named 2017 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. Moskal’s research has led to two rapid-acting antidepressants currently in clinical development, and Meade’s has led to development of electronic biosensors for DNA and protein detection.

  • Kamalesh Sirkar, a distinguished professor of chemical engineering at New Jersey Institute of Technology, has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Sirkar is known for his innovations in industrial membrane technology

  • Computer Science Professor Kanad Ghose from Binghamton University has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. His research has resulted in several breakthrough designs in processor architecture, power-aware systems and high-performance computing infrastructures.

  • The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) elected 15 members of The Optical Society as NAI Fellows on 13 December 2016. The newly elected fellows will be recognized, and will be formally inducted on 6 April 2017 at the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Dr. Stuart H. Rubin, a scientist at the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) who significantly advanced the fields of artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and deep learning, has been selected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Michael Pishko, the dean of the University of Wyoming College of Engineering and Applied Science, was elected as a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. He was honored specifically for his work and innovations in the areas of diabetes management, drug delivery and pollution remediation.

  • Provost Emeritus Stephen W. Director from Northeastern University, a pioneer in the field of electronic design automation and who has a long record of commit¬ment to and innovation in engineering education, has been named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow.

  • Four ACerS members were named 2016 Fellows by the National Academy of Inventors last week. They are Delbert Day (Missouri University of Science and Technology), Richard Riman (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey), Mrityunjay Singh (Ohio Aerospace Institute), and Anil Virkar (University of Utah).

  • Noted scientist Dr. Raghunath Mashelkar from the National Innovation Foundation in India has been elected as Fellow of the US National Academy of Inventors. He is the first ever Indian working in India who is elected as Fellow of NAI. Dr. Mashelkar has been elected for his contributions for pioneering the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) and Innovation movement in India.

  • This week, the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status. Thirteen National Academy of Medicine (NAM) members were among this list of distinguished innovators.

  • UCC’s Nabeel A Riza, Chair Professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, has been named a fellow of the US National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) on Tuesday named Texas A&M University’s John L. Junkins among its 175 NAI Fellows for 2016. Induction ceremonies are set for April 6, 2017 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

  • An Ohio State University scientist has been awarded the title of Fellow by the National Academy of Inventors. Linda Saif, a researcher in the College of Food, Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the College of Veterinary Medicine, was one of 175 academic inventors to receive the honor this year.

  • David Fries has been named a prestigious Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). David is an interdisciplinary research scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition (IHMC) and an expert and true innovator in undersea technologies, especially microsystems and robotics for sensing applications, advanced sensor development, and mobile robotic systems for field applications.

  • Jean-Marie Basset, KAUST distinguished professor of chemical science and director of the University’s Catalysis Center, has been named a fellow of the U.S. National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • University of Utah materials science and engineering Distinguished Professor Anil Virkar, who has been with the U for more than 43 years, can add yet another honor to his list — he has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • CSULB College of Engineering Dean Forouzan Golshani, holder of nearly a dozen patents, is among 175 distinguished academic inventors named as Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Juan Gilbert, the Andrew Banks Family Preeminence Endowed Chair and the chair of the University of Florida Department of Computer & Information Science & Engineering (CISE), has been elected by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) to be an NAI Fellow.

  • H. Keith Moo-Young, chancellor of Washington State University Tri-Cities, has been named a 2016 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Dr. Martin M. Matzuk, director of the Center for Drug Discovery at Baylor College of Medicine, has been awarded the distinction of Fellow in the National Academy of Inventors for his contributions to reproductive medicine and therapeutics.

  • Michael Shur, the Patricia W. and C. Sheldon Roberts Professor of Solid State Electronics in the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, joins this year’s group of innovative luminaries honored with the NAI organization’s prestigious recognition for academic inventors.

  • The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) selection committee elected D. Craig Hooper, PhD, and Mathew Thakur, PhD, of Thomas Jefferson University to Fellow status, indicating a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.

  • On Tuesday (Dec. 13) the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) announced its 2016 NAI Fellows, including Suman Datta, Chang Family Professor of Engineering Innovation at the University of Notre Dame.

  • Lakshmi S. Nair, M. Phil., Ph.D., has been elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). At UConn Health she serves as associate professor of orthopedic surgery and associate director for science administration in the Institute for Regenerative Engineering, and also associate professor of biomedical engineering, materials science and engineering at UConn.

  • For their pioneering research that improves the welfare of others in everything from cancer treatments to reproductive health, 11 University of California innovators have been elected fellows to the prestigious National Academy of Inventors.

  • Garth Powis, professor and director of Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute’s (SBP) NCI-designated Cancer Center, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Richard E. Riman, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering in the School of Engineering at Rutgers-New Brunswick, has been elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Diane Cook, a Washington State University researcher who created one of the first, fully instrumented, smart home test sites and has equipped 100 smart apartments with sensor networks in 10 countries, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Jennifer K. Lodge, PhD, vice chancellor for research at Washington University in St. Louis and the holder of a patent for virus-resistant potato plants, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Gary A. Piazza, Ph.D., professor of pharmacology and oncologic sciences at USA Mitchell Cancer Institute, has been named an NAI Fellow by the National Academy of Inventors, one of 175 members of the 2016 class and the first ever from the University of South Alabama.

  • Eleven academic inventors from five universities and two research institutes that are part of the State University System of Florida have been elected as 2016 Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • The organization recognized Andrew M. Weiner, the Scifres Family Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

  • University at Buffalo researcher Paras Prasad, an internationally recognized expert in optics and photonics, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Prasad, PhD, serves as the executive director of UB’s Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics (ILPB).

  • Dr. Ali Emadi of McMaster University’s Faculty of Engineering has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Emadi is the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Hybrid Powertrain and professor of electrical and computer engineering and mechanical engineering at McMaster University.

  • Michael Cima and Edward W. Merrill, two MIT faculty, were named 2016 fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. They were recognized for contributions resulting in a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society.

  • John B. Goodenough, James W. McGinity and Sidigata V. (S.V.) Sreenivasan of The University of Texas at Austin have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). They join Joseph J. Beaman Jr., George Georgiou, Bob Metcalfe, Thomas Milner, Nicholas Peppas and Jonathan L. Sessler as NAI fellows from UT Austin.

  • David Akopian, professor of electrical and computer engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He is the second NAI Fellow for UTSA, following the appointment of C. Mauli Agrawal in 2015.

  • Raghunath Chaudhari, the Deane E. Ackers Distinguished Professor of Chemical & Petroleum Engineering in the School of Engineering at The University of Kansas, has been named a Fellow of the NAI in recognition of his innovative work in catalysis, reaction engineering, multiphase reactors and kinetic modeling.

  • Pat Halbur, professor and chair of veterinary diagnostic and production animal medicine, and Surya Mallapragada, Anson Marston Distinguished Professor and the Carol Vohs Johnson Chair in Chemical and Biological Engineering, from Iowa State University were named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Three University of South Florida faculty inventors, Thomas Weller, Sudeep Sakar and Nicholas Lawrence, along with USF alumnus Israel Morejon, will be formally inducted into the National Academy of Inventors for their work that has led to advances in electronics, biometrics, and anticancer drugs.

  • UC Santa Barbara professors James Speck and Larry Coldren are among the newest fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). The two professors join 173 other new fellows to the prestigious organization for 2016, and bring to eight the total number of UCSB faculty elected to the 6-year-old national academy.

  • Mindy Brashears, a professor of food microbiology and food safety in the Texas Tech University Department of Animal and Food Sciences, has been named a fellow to the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Mark J. Suto, Ph.D., vice president of Drug Discovery at Southern Research, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) in recognition of his wide-ranging contributions to pharmaceutical research and drug discovery efforts.

  • David Mooney, the Robert P. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and a Core Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard, has been elected a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Raj Rajkumar, the George Westinghouse Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Raj Rajkumar has helped Carnegie Mellon become a research hub for driverless technology.

  • Richard Baraniuk, Rice University’s Victor E. Cameron Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Baraniuk is an early contributor to the field of compressive sensing, which enables new kinds of digital cameras and medical imaging devices.

  • Professor Nelson Tansu, Lehigh’s Daniel E. ’39 and Patricia M. Smith Endowed Chair Professor in Photonics and Nanoelectronics at Lehigh University, has been named a Fellow of the NAI and is widely regarded as one of the world’s leading researchers and inventors in the field of semiconductor optoelectronics materials and devices.

  • T. Dwayne McCay, the president of Florida Institute of Technology and a renowned engineer and research scientist who was awarded 16 patents during his academic career, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Nazim Muradov, a University of Central Florida scientist who specializes in emission-free hydrogen-production systems has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Muradov of UCF’s Florida Solar Energy Center was recognized for his contributions to the field of clean alternative fuels.

  • USC faculty members Mark Humayun and Shrikanth “Shri” Narayanan have been elected to the National Academy of Inventors’ 2016 Fellows Program, the highest professional distinction accorded solely to academic inventors.

  • James Smith, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering in the Statler College of Engineering at West Virginia University, has spent his 40-year career focused on the areas of health, communications and energy, and has joined the ranks of fellowship in the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Kevin Parker, a University of Rochester researcher whose discoveries have been widely applied in medical imaging and image processing, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Parker is the William F. May Professor and dean emeritus of what is now the Hajim School of Engineering & Applied Sciences.

  • Case School of Engineering Dean Jeffrey Duerk, the Leonard Case Professor of Engineering, and Francis Papay, a professor of surgery in Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve, have been elected National Academy of Inventors Fellows for lifetime achievements and leadership in innovation and scientific discovery.

  • Three UC Berkeley faculty members and entrepreneurs have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. The three were chemist and nanotechnology pioneer Paul Alivisatos, bioengineer Amy Herr and chemical engineer Enrique Iglesia.

  • Alan G. Marshall, the Robert O. Lawton Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry at Florida State University, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, based on his pioneering work in co-inventing and developing Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry.

  • The 2016 National Academy of Inventors Fellows Selection Committee has named Provost and Executive Vice President of Florida International University Kenneth G. Furton an NAI Fellow. Provost Furton’s selection as an NAI Fellow is a testament to his significant accomplishments and his standing as a leading academic inventor and innovator.

  • Hany Farid, the Albert Bradley 1915 Third Century Professor and chair of the Department of Computer Science at Dartmouth, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Farid is being recognized for his research in image analysis and digital forensics, a field he pioneered at Dartmouth.

  • Roger A. de la Torre, MD, FACS, section chief of bariatric surgery at University of Missouri Health Care, has been named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). De la Torre, who also serves as associate professor and the John A. Growden Endowed Professor of Surgery at the MU School of Medicine, is the director of the MU Biodesign and Innovation Program.

  • Three faculty members at North Carolina State University are being named fellows by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). The new NAI fellows are B. Jayant Baliga, Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering; Ruben Carbonell, Frank Hawkins Kenan Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering; and Frances S. Ligler, Lampe Distinguished Professor in the Joint NC State-UNC Department of Biomedical Engineering.

  • Vanderbilt School of Engineering Dean Philippe Fauchet has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Fauchet is a successful entrepreneur and co-founder of SiMPore Inc., a nanotechnology company that designs and produces membranes and membrane-enabled products based on its silicon nanomembrane technologies.

  • UC Irvine engineering professors Michelle Khine, professor of biomedical engineering, and Enrique Lavernia, provost, executive vice chancellor, and distinguished professor of chemical engineering & materials science, have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors for 2016.

  • Gabriel P. López, vice president for Research and professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at The University of New Mexico has been named a 2016 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • A University of Tennessee faculty member who is an expert on improving the power grid is being inducted as a 2016 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Yilu Liu, the UT-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Governor’s Chair for Power Electronics, serves as deputy director of the National Science Foundation.

  • Three Caltech faculty members—William L. Johnson, Yu-Chong Tai, and Amnon Yariv—have been named fellows of the National Academy of Inventors. They will be inducted on April 6, 2017, at the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston.

  • Dr. Delbert E. Day, a prolific inventor from Missouri S&T whose work with specialty glasses has led to treatments for cancer, bone tissue regeneration and wound care, has been named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow.

  • Louisiana State University Boyd Professor of Chemistry and SEC Professor of the Year Isiah Warner and Professor of Equine Research Mandi Lopez have been named Fellows to the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Oregon Health & Science University Casey Eye Institute researcher David Huang, M.D., Ph.D., has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Huang, the Peterson Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at OHSU, has indeed demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in the field of vision research.

  • Barbara D. Boyan, Ph.D., the dean of the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Engineering, was elected a 2016 National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellow. Boyan, who holds 21 U.S. patents, will become the first NAI fellow from VCU.

  • Shane Farritor, the Lederer Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Farritor holds 48 patents for surgical devices and railroad technologies.

  • The National Academy of Inventors announced its 2016 class of fellows, including one from UC Davis: Simon Cherry, distinguished professor of biomedical engineering. The academy recognized Cherry for his work on medical imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) scanning and computed tomography.

  • Hamid Arastoopour, Henry R. Linden Professor of Engineering and Director of the Wanger Institute for Sustainability and Energy Research (WISER) at Illinois Institute of Technology, was named a 2016 National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellow.

  • Rita Colwell, a Distinguished University Professor in the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS), was just named a Fellow in the National Academy of Inventors. Colwell’s research and applied outreach have played a fundamental role in reducing the incidence and impact of cholera around the world.

  • Dr. K. Darrell Berlin, Regents Professor of Chemistry at Oklahoma State University, has been named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow. Berlin specializes in organic and medicinal chemistry and is recognized as a pioneer in the development of agents to treat a variety of cancers, as well as bacterial infections and heart arrhythmias.

  • Professor Grätzel, professor and director of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne’s Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces, is known worldwide for pioneering the field of molecular photovoltaics (the famous Grätzel cells), as well as energy- and electron-transfer reactions in mesoscopic systems in the context of solar electricity and fuels.

  • Dr. Kamal S. Ali, chair of the Department of Industrial Systems and Technology at Jackson State University, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Ali will be inducted on April 6, 2017, as part of the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum in Boston.

  • Washington State University professor Katrina L. Mealey has been elected a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. She discovered a potentially fatal gene mutation in dogs, developed a test for it and has established a unique program at WSU of individualized medical treatment for pets.

  • Two of the new Fellows from Duke come from the Pratt School of Engineering: David Smith and Jennifer L. West. They are joined by Paul Modrich, the James B. Duke professor in the Department of Biochemistry in the Duke Medical School, and 2015 Nobel laureate in chemistry.

  • Innovative luminaries are honored with prestigious recognition for academic inventors. The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has named 175 leaders of academic invention to NAI Fellow status. With the election of the 2016 class, there are now 757 NAI Fellows, representing 229 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. The 2016 Fellows are named inventors on 5,437 issued U.S. patents, bringing the collective patents held by all NAI Fellows to more than 26,000 issued U.S. patents.

  • Provost Carolyn Dever has named biochemistry and cell biology professor Dean Madden and engineering professor Eric Fossum to lead key elements of Dartmouth’s research and enterprise efforts. Fossum takes over Jan. 1 as associate provost for the Office of Entrepreneurship and Technology Transfer (OETT), following Professor Tillman Gerngross, who served three years in the position.

  • Henry I. Smith, professor emeritus of electrical engineering, has been awarded the 2017 IEEE Robert Noyce Medal in recognition of his “contributions to lithography and nanopatterning through experimental advances in short-wavelength exposure systems and attenuated phase-shift masks.”

  • Marlan O. Scully, distinguished professor of physics and astronomy at Texas A&M University, has been elected as a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS). Scully is one of 63 new foreign members elected during the October 24-25 general meeting of the Division of RAS and subsequently approved as part of the October 28 general meeting of the broader Academy.

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, UTSA interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, has been named a fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). His election by his peers recognizes his “distinguished contributions to the fields of orthopedic and cardiovascular biomaterials and implants, with significant impact on biomedical sciences and improving healthcare outcomes.”

  • Richards-Kortum and students in her “Beyond Traditional Borders” bioengineering training program have obtained 30 patents for their designs. For that work, she was recently tapped as a MacArthur Foundation Fellow. Each year 20 to 30 people are awarded MacArthur Fellowships, of known as “Genius Grants,” which include a stipend of $625,000. Richards-Kortum said she’ll use the money for continuing her efforts in places like Malawi and Rwanda.

  • For the past several years Connected World magazine has coined these very unique individuals as Pioneers. These visionary individuals have boundless inspiration that create solutions, patents, and products. They are the disruptors forging new pathways in this ever-emerging digital age. Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis is one of the ten aspiring pioneers in this release.

  • Rice University researcher Antonios Mikos was selected for the Shu Chien Achievement Award by the Biomedical Engineering Society’s (BMES) Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering (CMBE) special interest group. Mikos is the Louis Calder Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, at Rice University.

  • Thanks to a breakthrough led by researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin, treatment for hemophilia can now be administered via a capsule, giving people affected by the hereditary bleeding disorder hope for a less expensive, less painful treatment option than conventional injections or infusions. Nicholas A. Peppas is a co-inventor and co-author.

  • Researchers have learned to bind carbon and silicon together using artificial catalysts. But Frances Arnold, a chemical engineer at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, wanted to test whether some of life’s enzymes could do that too, given the opportunity. By scouring protein databases, she and her colleagues found a few dozen promising enzymes.

  • Michael Bass was elected to the list of AAAS fellows by his peers in the organization. It’s an honor reserved for those who have made scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. Bass was elected for his contributions to the fields of lasers and optics.

  • Dr. Jonathan Sessler, the Doherty-Welch Chair in Chemistry at The University of Texas at Austin College of Natural Sciences, has been named the 2016 UT Inventor of the Year for work that has added to the basic scientific understanding of pharmaceuticals and helped form a commercially successful business in that field.

  • A half-dozen Rice faculty members have been awarded grants from the Virginia and L.E. Simmons Family Foundation Mini-Collaborative Research Fund to work with physicians and scientists at Texas Children’s Hospital and/or Houston Methodist Research Institute on studies ranging from chronic infection and immunotherapy to disease factors in cancer and heart disease. Naomi Halas, Stanley C. Moore Professor of ECE was one of those recipients.

  • “Biomaterials and Biotechnology: From the Discovery of the First Angiogenesis Inhibitors to the Development of Controlled Drug Delivery Systems and the Foundation of Tissue Engineering,” is presented by Professor Robert S. Langer, David H. Koch Institute Professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • John A. Rogers, Ph.D., Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Medicine and Director of the Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics at Northwestern University, presents at the 25th Annual Kay Malmstrom Lecture in Physics, “Soft Electronics for the Human Body.”

  • C. L. Max Nikias is president of the University of Southern California. He holds faculty appointments in both electrical engineering and the classics. Wall Street Journal Leadership Expert C. L. Max Nikias says that higher education needs more dual appointments to foster the kind of collaborative research needed to keep up with technological advances.

  • C. Mauli Agrawal, UTSA interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, has been named a fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). His election by his peers recognizes his “distinguished contributions to the fields of orthopedic and cardiovascular biomaterials and implants, with significant impact on biomedical sciences and improving healthcare outcomes.”

  • Dr. Yu-Dong Yao, Professor and Department Director of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, presents, “Cognitive Radio Research: Spectrum Sensing and Identification of Radio Terminals and Malicious Users,” today, Thursday, November 3rd.

  • Dr. Cato T. Laurencin is honored with the 2016 Connecticut Medal of Technology as a world-renowned physician-scientist in orthopaedic surgery, engineering, and materials science, who has developed technologies that are revolutionary and in use in important applications in the marketplace.

  • Indiana University Distinguished Professor Richard D. DiMarchi is ranked No. 3 among the world’s top translational researchers by Nature Biotechnology, a monthly journal focused on science and business within the industry. This marks consecutive years that DiMarchi, one of the world’s leading peptide chemists, has appeared among the list’s top five inventors.

  • Vanderbilt’s Li Min Chen, M.D., M.S., Ph.D., associate professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, has been named a Distinguished Investigator of the Academy of Radiology Research. Chen is one of 38 imaging researchers honored for their significant contributions to scientific progress and medical innovation.

  • The Franklin Institute in Philadelphia announced that Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, the J.C. Warner Professor of Natural Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University, and Mitsuo Sawamoto, professor of polymer chemistry at the University of Kyoto, have won its 2017 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Chemistry. They will receive the award on May 4, 2017, during a ceremony at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.

  • The University of New Mexico Optical Sciences and Engineering program in conjunction with the School of Engineering and the College of Arts and Sciences will hold a distinguished lecture series in November featuring Nader Engheta, a leader in the field of photonics. Engheta is to present three lectures.

  • Olin College President Richard K. Miller has been named the 2017 Brock International Prize in Education Laureate for his many contributions to the reinvention of engineering education in the 21st century. The Brock International Prize in Education is awarded annually and recognizes individuals who have made a specific innovation or contribution resulting in a significant impact on the practice or understanding of the field of education.

  • NAI Fellows Samir Mitragotri, Ph.D., of UC Santa Barbara, David R. Walt, Ph.D., of Tufts University, and Michael Jerome Yaszemski, M.D., Ph.D., of the Mayo Clinic join the 79 new members chosen by the National Academy of Medicine in recognition of their professional achievement and commitment to service.

  • Kam Leong has developed an impressive array of innovative nanotechnologies. The most widely known of his designs resulted from his work as a postdoc in the laboratory of MIT’s Robert Langer. While there, Leong played a critical role in the development of Gliadel, a controlled-release therapy that uses biodegradable polymer particles to deliver an anticancer drug to a brain tumor site following surgery.

  • Rebecca Richards-Kortum, a Texas bioengineer developing point-of-care medical technologies and a new approach to engineering education and Claudia Rankine, one of poetry’s brightest and most innovative stars, are among this year’s 23 MacArthur fellows and recipients of the so-called “genius” grants.

  • President Michael R. Lovell will recognize faculty, staff and students who have earned patents, Wednesday, Oct. 5, from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in the AMU Monaghan Ballrooms. RSVP with University Special Events to attend this event. President Lovell and Dr. Joseph Schimmels are two NAI Fellows that will be represented at the event.

  • John C. Herr, 68, director of the University of Virginia’s Center for Research in Contraceptive and Reproductive Health, passed away unexpectedly on Saturday after having participated that morning in the Gene Arnold Memorial Special Olympics 10K Run & 2 Mile Walk at Meriwether Lewis Elementary School in Ivy. A professor of cell biology, urology and biomedical engineering, Herr, who came to UVA’s School of Medicine in 1981, championed basic science and translational goals, sharing that dedication with colleagues and students.

  • The American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) will host a special symposium in honor of Texas ChE Professor Nicholas Peppas’ 40 years in academia during the 2016 AIChE Annual Meeting in San Francisco, California this November.

  • Prof. Donald E. Ingber is a speaker at the 27th European Students Conference, with his presentation on, “Organs on Chips — Alternative Testing and Future Drug Design.” He will introduce chips that respond to drugs like human organs do — and have the potential to replace animal testing for safety and efficacy early in the drug-development process.

  • An International Conference on Medical Imaging & Diagnosis is being held on October 20-21 at Chicago, Illinois. Kattesh V. Katti, Director from the University of Missouri is a Speaker at the event.

  • Jennifer Doudna, Professor of Chemistry and of Molecular and Cell Biology at the University of California, Berkeley, is a speaker at this conference, being held from May 1-4, 2016.

  • For demonstrated eminence and outstanding accomplishments in engineering and technology, Anil Jain of Michigan State University will become a Foreign Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering (INAE), effective Nov. 1, 2016. Only five Foreign Fellows are elected each year by the INAE.

  • A daylong brain research symposium for Wayne State University researchers will take place Sept. 29 at the new Integrative Biosciences Center. The keynote speaker will be Kamil Ugurbil, Ph.D., director of the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research at the University of Minnesota.

  • Weebit Nano Ltd, today announced its collaboration with Leti, a leading French microelectronics research institute, to develop advanced ReRAM memory technology based on silicon oxide (SiOx) to replace flash memory. Weebit has licensed ReRAM technology from Professor James Tour of Rice University. Professor Tour is one of the world’s most renowned nanoelectronics researchers.

  • David J. Prince, whose right leg was amputated after a motorcycle accident in 2002, started hearing reports showing that bilateral rivals were extending the length of their prosthetics. University of Pittsburgh’s director of human engineering research laboratories, Rory Cooper, who was a 1988 Paralympic medal winner in wheelchair racing, said data will be collected in Rio and concurred that “nobody’s really done a definitive study.”

  • The UH Cullen College of Engineering’s Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department is proud to welcome Kaushik Rajashekara as its first National Academy of Engineering (NAE) and National Academy of Inventors (NAI) faculty member.

  • Curtis R. Carlson, Ph.D., is a pioneer in the development and use of innovation best practices and an evangelist for innovation, education and economic development, sharing best practices with government agencies, businesses and foundations around the world. He speaks on October 5, 2016 at Stevens Institute of Technology.

  • The World Energy Forum hosts its 2016 Program Event between October 19-22, 2016 at the United Nations Headquarters, New York Hilton Midtown, Harvard Club, and Yale Club in New York City. Program Speakers include NAI Fellows, Dr. Kristina M. Johnson and Dr. Thomas O. Mensah.

  • Dr. Donald Ingber, Professor of Bioengineering at Harvard John. A. Paulson School of Engineering & Applied Sciences, presents “Biologically Inspired Engineering: From Human Organs-on-Chips to Programmable Nanotherapeutics” at the University of Miami.

  • Art Tipton, Ph.D., president and CEO of Southern Research. Tipton has 40 U.S. patents and is a 2013 inductee into the National Academy of Inventors. This week is Birmingham Innovation Week, the third annual celebration of innovation in the city and the inventors, investors, and entrepreneurs that drive it.

  • This Graduate Fellowship is given in memory of Dr. Christodoulos A. Floudas by his friends and family. Dr. Floudas, the Erle Ney ’59 Chair Professor for Engineering Excellence and Professor of Chemical Engineering, was the Director of the Texas A&M Energy Institute and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

  • This week is Birmingham Innovation Week, the third annual celebration of innovation in the city and the inventors, investors, and entrepreneurs that drive it.

  • The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a team led by Dr. Leonidas Iasemidis, the Rhodes Eminent Scholar Chair and professor of biomedical engineering at Louisiana Tech University, a $6 million grant over four years to investigate the origins and impacts of brain seizures associated with epilepsy.

  • The 3rd International Conference and Exhibition on Biopolymers and Bioplastics is from September 12-14, 2016 and consists of six discussions within 3 days at San Antonio, Texas. One of the notable speakers is National Academy of Inventor’s Fellow, Ramani Narayan with his discussion title being, “Understanding biodegradability—the science, the misuse, and true value proposition.”

  • “Science is full of surprises.” Bruce Hammock, UC Davis distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, is fond of saying that in his many talks. A recently published news story, “From Caterpillars to Kidney Disease: Surprise Discoveries in Basic Science,” on the Medical College of Wisconsin website chronicles how Hammock’s basic research on caterpillars—how caterpillars become butterflies—led to key discoveries about chronic pain, including diabetic pain.

  • Dr. Christodoulos A. “Chris” Floudas, director of the Texas A&M Energy Institute, passed away Sunday (Aug. 14) while on vacation with his family in Greece. Floudas, the Erle Nye ’59 Chair Professor for Engineering Excellence in the Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering at Texas A&M University.

  • Professor John Bowers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) has been selected to receive the 2017 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Photonics Award. Bowers is the first faculty member from UCSB to receive the honor, which recognizes his pioneering research in silicon photonics, including hybrid silicon lasers, photonic integrated circuits and ultralow-loss waveguides.

  • M. Katherine Banks, vice chancellor and dean of engineering, has appointed Dr. B. Don Russell holder of a Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) Distinguished Research Chair Professorship. The distinguished research chair appointment is effective Sept. 1.

  • The National Academy of Inventors (NAI) has appointed Sethuraman “Panch” Panchanathan, executive vice president of Knowledge Enterprise Development and chief research and innovation officer at Arizona State University, to its Board of Directors for 2016-2017. Panchanathan is one of three NAI Fellows to have been named to the board.

  • Kaushik Rajashekara joins the Cullen College as a Distinguished Professor of electrical and computer engineering. Rajashekara comes to Houston from the University of Texas at Dallas where he served as Distinguished Professor and Endowed Chair in the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Erik Jonssen School of Engineering and Computer Science.

  • Recent accomplishments earned by members of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln community include Prem Paul, vice chancellor for research and economic development, who was recently appointed to the National Academy of Inventors Board of Directors.

  • The NCAA Division I Board of Directors today elected Eric W. Kaler, president of the University of Minnesota, as chair. Kaler begins his new role after two years representing the Big Ten Conference on the board. The board, which is comprised of 24 members, is the top governing body for Division I and is responsible for the strategy, policy and oversight of legislation, including its relationship to higher education.

  • Dr. Nadine Aubry, Dean of the College of Engineering and University Distinguished Professor at Northeastern University, part of the Global Engineering Deans Council (GEDC) will be at WEEF & GEDC 2016 hosted at Seoul from November 6-10.

  • John Bowers, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and of materials at UC Santa Barbara, has been selected to receive the 2017 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Photonics Award. Bowers is the first faculty member from UCSB to receive the honor, which recognizes his “pioneering research in silicon photonics, including hybrid silicon lasers, photonic integrated circuits and ultra low-loss waveguides.”

  • Researchers at the University of Central Florida received an all-time-high $145.75 million in funded research in FY16, a period that featured a national top 20 ranking for UCF patents and a new record for federal funding. Two UCF researchers, Issa Batarseh and Guifang Li, were named Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, becoming UCF’s eighth and ninth members of the select academy.

  • Chemists at The University of Texas at Arlington have invented a method to quantify water content in solid pharmaceutical drugs that is faster, cheaper, more accurate and more precise than Karl Fischer titration, the method currently recognized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and widely used worldwide. Daniel Armstrong is UTA’s Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry and leader of the project.

  • Rory A. Cooper, Ph.D. FISA & Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) Chair and Distinguished Professor of the Department of Rehabilitation Science & Technology, at the University of Pittsburgh, is the Plenary Speaker at the PVA Summit 2016 Expo. For six years Paralyzed Veterans of America has expanded its commitment to spinal cord injury/disease (SCI/D), MS, ALS and TBI patient care through its annual Summit.

  • SME, which serves the manufacturing industry by promoting advanced manufacturing technology and is recognized as a key resource for the industry, has elected Behrokh Khoshnevis, of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, to its 2016 College of Fellows.

  • Water warriors Bruce Hammock, distinguished professor of entomology with a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, and research scientist Christophe Morisseau of the Hammock lab proved to be “The Splash Brothers.” It was all part of the 13th annual Hammock Lab Water Balloon Battle, dubbed “Balloon Battle at Briggs” held recently on the Briggs Hall lawn.

  • SXSW 2017 Keynotes will take place from Friday, March 10 – Saturday, March 18 and feature speakers from the Interactive, Film, Music, and Convergence Tracks. Jeniffer Doudna, Ph.D is a professor of molecular and cell biology and chemistry at the University of California, Berkeley, and will be a keynote speaker at the event.

  • Huw M. L. Davies, Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Chemistry at Emory University, will hold seminar “Collaborative Approach for C-H Functionalization” at the University of Texas Knoxville on the 20th of October. Professor Davies’ research emphasizes the development of new enantioselective synthetic methods and their applications in total synthesis and drug discovery.

  • Professor John Baras (ECE/ISR) has been elevated to the rank of Fellow in the International Federation for Automatic Control (IFAC). Baras will be honored along with other IFAC Fellows in the class of 2017 next July at the 20th IFAC World Congress in Toulouse, France.

  • Ann Progulske-Fox Ph.D., a distinguished professor in the University of Florida department of oral biology, was honored by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) when she was inducted as a 2015 Fellow of the NAI on April 15. Progulske-Fox was one of two new members from the University of Florida; joining nine UF members who were inducted previously.

  • Researchers from George Washington University have received a $28 million grant from the NIH to lead an 18-site collaboration, named “BELIEVE,” to find a cure for HIV. Their innovative cell therapy approach will focus on making individuals’ immune systems work better in eliminating HIV reservoirs. NAI Fellow, Douglas Nixon, principal investigator, will be on this team search and collaborate with 17 different medical sites on this important research.

  • The annual Pioneers of Progress awards recognize Utahns who reflect a modern-day spirit of pioneering through service and achievement in their communities. Five modern-day pioneers who echo the spirit of Utah’s pioneers were honored, which included NAI Fellow, Cynthia Furse.

  • Dr. Meyya Meyyappan, Chief Scientist for Exploration Technology at NASA Ames Research Center, is the keynote speaker for the annual 2016 Nano Manufacturing Conference. Their primary goal is to bring together leaders to share their vision for the future and the opportunities that Nano Manufacturing enables.

  • The Cape-wide Hydrangea Festival takes place July 8-17, and the official opening of the North American Hydrangea Test Garden at the Heritage Museums & Gardens in Sandwich on Tuesday, July 12. NAI Fellow Michael Dirr and his wife are sponsors of the Garden, with Michael Dirr renowned horticulturist and a University of Georgia professor emeritus of horticulture.

  • ARA Biosystems, Inc., a company developing physiologically relevant “heart-on-a-chip” tissue models for both toxicology and drug discovery applications, announced today that it has appointed biotechnology entrepreneur, scientist and engineer Robert S. Langer, Ph.D., to its board of directors.

  • Antonios G. Mikos is the Louis Calder Professor of Bioengineering and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University. He is one of the Plenary Speakers for the ISFOE16 to be held at Thessaloniki, Greece from July 4-7, 2016.

  • Mary-Dell Chilton was the first person to show that bacteria could genetically modify plants. Shortly after her landmark work in 1977, the plant biotechnologist moved from academia to what is now Syngenta in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, where she continues her research. (This article was originally published in the journal Nature).

  • Rice University bioengineer Antonios Mikos has been elected to the Academy of Athens – Greece’s national academy and highest research establishment – as a corresponding member in the Section of the Sciences.

  • Professor Nicholas Peppas has been appointed to a three-year term on the National Materials and Manufacturing Board, part of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine.

  • Benjamin Hsiao, PhD, a Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Stony Brook University, has been selected as a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)-Lemelson 2016-17 Class of Invention Ambassadors.

  • The president of the University of Cincinnati has been named to a similar post at the University of British Columbia. Santa Ono, who was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, has served as president of the University of Cincinnati since 2012.

  • In March 2016 NASA awarded three prizes for proposals on the use of in situ Martian resources to construct habitats for astronauts. First prize was awarded to Dr. Behrokh Khoshnevis of USC. Dr. Khoshnevis’ process contributed not only to NASA’s mission to Mars or any space mission requiring the construction of a habitat, but also to construction of buildings on Earth.

  • Robert Magnusson, UTAs Texas Instruments distinguished university chair in nanoelectronics and professor of electrical engineering, will explore the possibility of using a novel optical resonance effect in nanostructured silicon films to generate light, which could lead to more efficient and compact integrated photonic-electric circuits.

  • At an awards ceremony held Thursday in Lisbon, Portugal, the European Patent Office (EPO) recognized Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) professor Robert Langer with the European Inventor Award in its “non-European countries” category.

  • Jennifer A. Lewis presents “3D Printing: Making the Future” on Thursday, September 22, 2016 at UC Denver. Lewis is the Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University.

  • UTA President Vistasp Karbhari said on Tuesday that a proposal to build an on-campus hotel in the College Park District has been discussed. The topic was brought up during a Q&A session after a presentation to the Arlington City Council.

  • University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) professor James Liao, the new head of Academia Sinica, on Monday said he felt the responsibility of “going home to help deal with problems.”

  • A researcher known for breakthrough discoveries in genetics that have allowed scientists to efficiently and precisely modify DNA sequences and correct genetic defects in any cell will receive the University of Pittsburgh’s 2016 Dickson Prize in Medicine.

  • Guest speaker Dr. Mensah, kicked off the workshop by inspiring students to recognize their full potential to be leaders of innovation in technology. Students were able to try out virtual reality technology, which opened their eyes to the unbelievable careers associated with newly emerging technologies.

  • Dr. Howard Federoff talked with UCI Magazine about the future of UC Irvine Health, both as an academic medical center and as a national leader in integrated, high-quality and affordable care for everyone. Federoff joined UCI in July 2015 as the vice chancellor of health affairs and dean of medicine. In January, he also became CEO for UC Irvine Health (and stepped down as dean).

  • Symic, a clinical stage biotherapeutics company developing novel compounds that target and affect the extracellular matrix, today announced that Alyssa Panitch, Ph.D., one of the founders of the company and an inventor of Symic’s technology, has been appointed to chair the company’s Scientific Advisory Board.

  • John Daugman, Professor of Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition at the University of Cambridge, was awarded the 2016 IAPR Senior Biometrics Investigator Award, and will be presenting a Keynote speech at the 9th IAPR (International Association for Pattern Recognition) International Conference on Biometrics, being held at Sweden from June 13-16, 2016.

  • InCube Labs is working to build a medical device that may allow people with spinal-cord injuries to once again normally use their bladders—or at least to replicate normal use. The company was founded by inventor Mir Imran in 1995, and is now incubating six businesses in its San Antonio office, which opened in 2010.

  • Frances Arnold, the Dick and Barbara Dickinson Professor of Chemical Engineering, Bioengineering and Biochemistry at Caltech, has been awarded the Millennium Technology Prize for her “directed evolution” method, which creates new and better proteins in the laboratory using principles of evolution.

  • There is an urgent and pressing need for the better provision of clean water on a worldwide basis. The conference will allow the dissemination and discussion of cutting edge research in water process engineering, sustainability and energy efficiency. Arup K. Sengupta from Lehigh University will be a speaker at this event taking place in Sitges, Spain from September 11-14, 2016.

  • President James W. Wagner of Emory University, concludes an extraordinary 13-year tenure characterized by an unwavering commitment to excellence. Wagner has outstanding credentials, having been interim president, provost, and a former dean at Case Western Reserve University.

  • Joseph DeSimone, William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at NC State and Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Barack Obama at a White House ceremony.

  • Dr. Thomas O. Mensah is spearheading an effort with leading entrepreneurs to make Mississippi (MS); the Magnolia State, the silicon valley of the South. Dr. Mensah envisioned the creation of innovation centers in MS to focus on the development of drone manufacturing and business accelerators.

  • Renowned researcher and inventor Professor James Collins, MIT, presents the 2016 Department of Bioengineering annual lecture. Synthetic biology is bringing together engineers, physicists and biologists to model, design and construct biological circuits out of proteins, genes and other bits of DNA, and to use these circuits to rewire and reprogram organisms.

  • UConn’s Dr. Cato Laurencin was honored by President Barack Obama with the National Medal of Technology and Innovation, “for seminal work in the engineering of musculoskeletal tissues, especially for revolutionary achievements in the design of bone matrices and ligament regeneration; and for extraordinary work in promoting diversity and excellence in science.”

  • During the 2016 ACP (Asia Communications and Photonics Conference), Plenary Speeches will be conducted by inventors Steven Chu, from the University of Stanford, a Nobel Prize Laureate in Physics, and Alan E. Willner, from the University of Southern California.

  • Jennifer A. Doudna, University of California, Berkeley; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, will be presenting a lecture at the Marine Biological Laboratory on the CRISPR-Cas9 enzyme mechanism. These results highlight a new era, paving the way to both fundamental discoveries in biology, with applications in all branches of biotechnology, and strategies for curing human genetic disease.

  • Agenovir announced today that it’s raised $10.6 million in a round led by Data Collective. Agenovir is based on the work of scientific founder Stephen Quake, a Stanford University bioengineering professor. He is part of Agenovir’s scientific advisory board, as well as MIT researcher, Roberg Langer.

  • Meet DHA-SBT-1214 – they’re working on a stage name – a revolutionary drug that’s been 20 years in the making already. Iwao Ojima, an SBU distinguished professor of chemistry discovered the drug while screening “multi-drug-resistant tumor cell lines,” as James Egan put it, and has spent the better part of two decades researching its effectiveness against both tumors and those stubborn stem cells.

  • Chad A. Mirkin, director of the International Institute for Nanotechnology and George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry, Northwestern University, received the 2016 AIC Gold Medal on Heritage Day on May 16, 2016.

  • The increasing demand for flexible, wearable electronics, sensors, antennas, and biomedical devices has led a research team to innovate an eye-popping way of printing complex metallic architectures as though seemingly suspended in midair. The research was led by Wyss core faculty member Jennifer Lewis.

  • The construction of a solar power station in orbit was recently introduced from Caltech researcher Ali Hajimiri. He has developed the technology at the California Institute of Technology that would be required for solar power plants in the sky. Hajimiri is convinced that they can solve the energy problem of humanity.

  • In her TEDMED talk, Harvard-MIT physician, bioengineer and entrepreneur Sangeeta Bhatia showed how miniaturization, through the convergence of engineering and medicine, is transforming health– specifically, through the promise of nanotechnology for early detection of cancer.

  • University of Alabama at Birmingham Vice President for Research and Economic Development Richard B. Marchase, Ph.D., will retire at the end of 2016 after three decades of service to UAB students, faculty and staff that influenced the institution’s growth, economic impact and world-changing advancements in research.

  • Charlotte A. E. Hauser, KAUST professor of bioscience, and Jean M. J. Fréchet, KAUST distinguished professor of chemical science and the University’s vice president for research, have been elected to the rank of NAI Fellows by the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Shubhra Gangopadhyay, C.W. LaPierre Endowed Chair Professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of Missouri, was elected to National Academy of Inventors. The work Gangopadhyay was selected for was her effort in making DNA analysis for medical studies increasingly flexible and more mobile through advances in the methods and processes used in the analysis.

  • Scientists claim to have developed an invisible elastic film that can be applied to the skin to reduce the appearance of wrinkles and eye bags. Once applied, the formula dries to form a film that “mimics the properties of youthful skin”, Nature Materials reports after a series of small trials. Professor Robert Langer leads the work at MIT.

  • Biological Engineer, James Collins, sketched out some of the paths he and his collaborators are pursuing in a lecture he called “Redesigning Life” at the University of Delaware’s Edward G. Jefferson Lecture on Tuesday, May 3. They are working to use the tools of molecular biology to manipulate cellular processes and carry out specific missions that don’t happen in natural genetic circuitry.

  • PureTech Health announced the launch of Vor BioPharma, an immunology company dedicated to developing a new class of targeted cell therapies. Leading oncologists and immunologists are supporting Vor in developing its pipeline of novel immunotherapies. The companies scientific founders and Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) members includes Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Charles A. Bouman from Purdue University will conduct a lecture at the Tandon School of Engineering at New York University. Imaging research is entering into a new era of innovation driven by the tight integration of algorithms, computation, and sensor design.

  • Dr. Franky So has been named the Walter and Ida Freeman Distinguished Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) at North Carolina State University by Dr. Louis A. Martin-Vega, dean of the College of Engineering.

  • Stephen Forrest, Peter A. Franken Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and Paul G. Goebel Professor of Engineering, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). As director of the Optoelectronic Components and Materials (OCM) Laboratory, he and his group conduct research on photovoltaic cells, organic light emitting diodes, and lasers & optics.

  • President Peter Salovey announced W. Mark Saltzman, the Goizueta Foundation Professor of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, as the next head of Jonathan Edwards College. Saltzman has been a member of the Yale faculty since 2002, with appointments in biomedical engineering, chemical engineering, and cellular and molecular physiology.

  • Robert Fischell is the Spring 2016 Undergraduate Commencement Speaker for Stevens Institute of Technology. Scientist and engineer, Dr. Robert Fischell has had two pioneering careers: his current one inventing life-saving medical devices, and a former one helping create the modern satellite system that is so critical to communications, entertainment, business and national security.

  • Florida Atlantic University will confer more than 3,190 degrees during six commencement ceremonies. Richard DiMarchi, ’74, will receive an honorary doctoral degree during one of those ceremonies. DiMarchi is a leader in the field of drug discovery, and his contributions to diabetes treatment have benefited millions of people around the world.

  • Mary-Dell Chilton, a newly anointed National Academy of Inventors Fellow, is at least partially responsible for the way our food system works today. That’s because Chilton, now 77 and a scientist at Syngenta, led the team in the early 1980s that produced the world’s first transgenic plant — a development that paved the way for the disease and pest-resistant GMO crops that are so prevalent today.

  • Dr. B. Don Russell, Distinguished Professor and Regents Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Texas A&M University, has been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) for his two-year service as vice chair and chair of membership.

  • X.J. Meng, University Distinguished Professor of Molecular Virology at Virginia Tech, has been elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences. Membership in the academy is one of the highest honors given to a scientist in the United States.

  • The University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) and the Anchorage Economic Development Corporation, together with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) are hosting the first World Intellectual Property Day at UAA. Dr. Helena S. Wisniewski, UAA Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Studies, will be delivering the welcoming speech.

  • Dr. Jayakrishna Ambati, professor of physiology and vice chair of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine, has been named to The Ophthalmologist Power List 2016 ‘Top 100 Most Influential People in the World of Ophthalmology.’

  • Kristi S. Anseth from the University of Colorado Boulder, will be one of two speakers coming from the United States to the MACRO 2016 conference from the Turkish Chemical Society being held at Istanbul.

  • Professor Kristi Anseth has been named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow, a distinction recognizing academic inventors whose innovations make a tangible impact on society.

  • VisionGate Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Alan Nelson, PhD, was recently named a National Academy of Inventors (NAI) 2015 Fellow.

  • A knack for seeing practical ways to translate ideas into creations people need and use is a key tool of the trade for inventors like UAA’s Dr. Helena Wisniewski. Her gift for seeing potential has transformed even chance conversations with her daughter into “aha moments” that inspired a diversity of ideas. She was the first person from Alaska to be inducted into the NAI.

  • John Ballato is the Sirrine Endowed Chair in Optical Fiber and professor of materials science and engineering at Clemson University. The need to get more intense light through a fiber creates problems that call for new approaches. This lab at Clemson tackles the challenge.

  • UNM Distinguished Professors Steven R. J. Brueck and C. Jeffrey Brinker are among a cohort of 168 inventors from around the world who were chosen as 2015 National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellows.

  • Victor B. Lawrence, Charles Batchelor Chair Professor of Engineering at Stevens Institute of Technology, will be the speaker at the Jones Seminar at Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. The talk will examine the current economic and living conditions in the poorest parts of the world and the communications and computing infrastructure required for socio-economic development in these areas.

  • Prairie View A&M University is pleased to welcome Victor B. Lawrence, Ph.D. as Senior Advisor to the Cyber Security and Information Communication Systems Research Center (CSICSR) which is funded by the Texas A&M University System Chancellor’s Research Initiative. Dr. Lawrence will be inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.

  • Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, Vice President of Medical Affairs at the University of Maryland and the John Z. and Akiko Bowers Distinguished Professor, and Dean at UM SOM and Robert E. Fischell, ScD, a member of the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) Board of Visitors, were recently honored as fellows of the NAI.

  • University of Delaware inventors Norman J. Wagner III and the late Richard F. Heck, were inducted as fellows into the National Academy of Inventors on Friday, April 15, in ceremonies at the United States Patent and Trademark Office in Alexandria, Virginia.

  • ISEK hosts biannual conferences covering topics such as electrophysiology, movement analysis, posture & gait, rehabilitation, back evaluation, and EMG processing. The XXI ISEK Congress will take place July 5-8, 2016 in Chicago, Illinois, USA. Professor John A. Rogers will be a speaker.

  • From August 24-26, the 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Radio Frequency Integration Technology event will be held. Professor Mau-Chung Frank Chang presently the President of National Chiao Tung University, will be the keynote speaker.

  • Professor John Daugman has been elected a Fellow of the US National Academy of Inventors (NAI) at a ceremony in Washington DC.

  • The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 213 new members, including nine UC Berkeley faculty members. They include Jay D. Keasling, 2014 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Donald E. Ingber has been elected to Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious honor societies and a leading center for independent policy research.

  • Mary-Dell Chilton, Ph.D., a distinguished science fellow at Syngenta, has been named a National Academy of Inventors Fellow. One of the founders of modern plant biotechnology, Chilton’s research led her to produce the first transgenic plant in 1983, which contributed to increased agricultural productivity around the world.

  • Somenath Mitra, a distinguished professor of chemistry and environmental science at NJIT and a groundbreaking researcher in the field of environmental monitoring, was inducted last week into the National Academy of Inventors at a ceremony at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Atam Dhawan, a distinguished professor of electrical and computer engineering at NJIT and a pioneer in the field of point-of-care technologies in healthcare, was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) last week at a ceremony at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Gregg Fields, Ph.D., leading scientist at Florida Atlantic University has received $540,250 from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue his groundbreaking research to develop new therapeutic agents for collagen-based diseases including multiple sclerosis, cancer and sepsis.

  • The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) honored Robert Langer, ScD, with the 2016 AACR-Irving Weinstein Foundation Distinguished Lectureship at the AACR Annual Meeting 2016, held in New Orleans, April 16-20. Langer is the David H. Koch institute professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge.

  • Alan W. Cramb, president of Illinois Institute of Technology, was inducted as a Fellow into the prestigious National Academy of Inventors (NAI), joining 168 leaders of invention and innovation with this distinction.

  • Three LSU professors will receive Excellence in Innovation awards at the school’s 2016 Inventorship Showcase. One of the winners is K.T. Valsaraj, vice president of research & economic development, who is being inducted into the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Robert Langer is the David H. Koch Institute Professor at MIT, the highest honor that can be awarded to a faculty member. He is a speaker for this year’s Proteins & Peptides Conference.

  • U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) at a special ceremony in Washington, D.C. today at the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

  • Dr. Cato T. Laurencin, a world-renowned physician-scientist in orthopaedic surgery, engineering, and materials science, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Connecticut Medal of Technology. Laurencin, of the University of Connecticut will accept the award at the 41st Annual Meeting & Dinner of the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering (CASE) on May 24.

  • Kristina M. Johnson is the co-founder and CEO of Cube Hydro Partners, LLC, a clean-energy infrastructure company focused on building and operating hydropower plants in North America. She is the speaker of this event to be held on May 12, at the University of Maryland, A. James Clark School of Engineering.

  • Dr. Greg Ippolito and his colleagues at UT-Austin, Drs. George Georgiou, Andy Ellington, and Edward Marcotte, have developed a set of cutting-edge technologies being used to analyze the human immune response to vaccination or infection.

  • The University of Kentucky College of Engineering continues its tradition of bringing the top intellectual minds to campus with the 2016 Ashland Inc. Distinguished Lecture Series, which will feature innovator and Harvard Professor David A. Edwards, as he delivers his lecture “Sensory Delivery for Better Health.”

  • The Cockrell Family Regents Chair in Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, Nicholas A. Peppas will speak on “Intelligent Nanoscale Biopolymers for Recognitive and Responsive Delivery of Drugs, Peptides and Proteins.” His talk will take place at the Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility at UC Davis.

  • Innovators at public research universities lead the newest class of Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Among the 168 academic inventors selected for induction as NAI Fellows, 104 are from member universities of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU).

  • Philip Low, Ph.D., director of the Purdue Center for Drug Discovery, will deliver the next Flexner Discovery Lecture on April 14, entitled, “Ligand-targeted therapeutic and imaging agents for multiple human diseases.” Low is the Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Purdue University.

  • Scott Brandt is one of the judges at the UC Santa Cruz annual Grad Slam event. Grad Slam, also referred to as the 3-Minute Thesis Challenge, is a competition that challenges doctoral students to present years’ worth of academic research in a concise, compelling, three-minute talk to a non-expert audience.

  • SenGupta, the P.C. Rossin Senior Professor in the department of civil and environmental engineering, and three of his students have used zirconium oxide nanoparticles to invent the world’s first filter capable of removing both fluoride and arsenic from groundwater.

  • John Ballato, a professor of materials science and engineering and Sirrine Endowed Chair of Optical Fiber, has been elected an academician in the World Academy of Ceramics, an honor expected to boost Clemson’s international reputation.

  • President Michael Drake and Vice President for Research Caroline Whitacre hosted a Faculty Recognition Program on April 4, 2016, honoring Ohio State faculty members who received national or international awards during the period 2015-2016.

  • The American Institute for Medical and Biomedical Engineering (AIMBE) today presented its highest honor, the 2016 Pierre Galletti Award, to Rice University bioengineer Rebecca Richards-Kortum. Richards-Kortum, Rice’s Malcolm Gillis University Professor, professor of bioengineering and professor of electrical and computer engineering, is the first woman to win the Galletti Award.

  • GTCbio is proud to present the 3rd Metabolomics – Advances & Applications in Human Disease Conference, which will be part of The Genomics & Big Data Summit, where Howard Federoff is the keynote speaker. Howard is currently the Vice Chancellor of Health Affairs, the Dean of the School of Medicine, and acting CEO of UCI Health at the University of California, Irvine.

  • The Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering Hall of Fame will soon extend honors to two new members. Dr. Terry S. King, Provost and Executive Vice President of Ball State University; and Dr. W. Mark Saltzman, Goizueta Foundation Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical & Environmental Engineering & Psychology of Yale University.

  • The International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT), the global society of clinicians, researchers, regulatory specialists, technologists, and industry partners dedicated to the translation of cellular therapy into safe and effective therapies to improve patients’ lives, today announces Dr. Darwin J. Prockop, M.D., Ph.D. will be awarded the inaugural ‘ISCT Career Achievement Award in Cellular Therapy’

  • Evelo Biosciences, the pioneer of Oncobiotic™ Therapies, microbiome-based therapeutics for cancer, today announced the establishment of its Scientific Advisory Board (SAB). The newly appointed SAB will serve as a strategic resource for Evelo as the company advances the development of its therapeutic platform. This includes, NAI fellow, Jim Collins.

  • Harvard materials scientist Jennifer A. Lewis, whose pioneering work in microscale 3D printing is advancing the development of 3D printed tissue structures, flexible electronics, and new materials, has been selected as a 2016 National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellow (NSSEFF) by the Department of Defense.

  • Harnessing biological mechanisms to design useful functions is a central goal of synthetic biology. As an Allen Distinguished Investigator, Jim Collins will explore novel technologies for manipulating gene circuits to confer designed advantages in antimicrobial therapies.

  • Renowned researcher, entrepreneur and solar energy expert D. Yogi Goswami of the University of South Florida has been named the 2016 winner of the Karl W. Böer Solar Energy Medal of Merit.

  • Entrepreneur-turned-philanthropist Paul G. Allen has committed an initial $100 million to create The Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, toward a 10-year plan focused on exploring and funding cutting-edge bioscience. The Frontiers Group has named Tom Skalak, Ph.D., as its founding executive. He was previously VP for research at the University of Virginia, where he conducted bioengineering research for 28 years.

  • The Emil Thomas Kaiser Award from the Protein Society, recognizes a recent, highly significant contribution in applying chemistry to the study of proteins. The 2016 The Emil Thomas Kaiser Award recipient is Dr. Charles S. Craik (University of California, San Francisco). Dr. Craik the founder and director of the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Graduate Program.

  • MJ Soileau, vice president for UCF’s Office of Research and Commercialization, has been named to the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. Soileau, who oversees the office responsible for taking research from UCF labs into industry, is also an accomplished scientist, researcher and professor.

  • Jennifer Doudna is the recipient of the 2016 Canada Gairdner International Award. Jennifer Doudna is the Li Ka Shing Chancellor’s Chair in Biomedical and Health Sciences and she is Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology and Professor of Chemistry at UC Berkeley and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

  • The Oklahoma chapter of the Association for Women in Science at OU Health Sciences Center will host Dr. Anne Pereira for a lecture in honor of Women’s History Month. Keeping with the theme of Women’s History Month, Pereira has been asked to speak about historical women whose achievements have inspired her and women she has learned from in her career.

  • On Tuesday, May 3, Collins will highlight recent efforts to create synthetic gene networks and programmable cells when he presents the Edward G. Jefferson Life Sciences Lecture at the University of Delaware’s Roselle Center for the Arts.

  • Bruce Hammock, UC Davis distinguished professor of entomology, is the first recipient of the prestigious John C. McGiff Memorial Award for his pioneering contributions to eicosanoid research. Eicosanoids are a particular class of fats that, rather than being nutritional or structural, are regulatory. They regulate blood pressure, childbirth, pain, inflammation, tissue repair and other biologies.

  • All organisms build their cells from carbon-based molecules. Because silicon atoms bond to other atoms in a manner similar to carbon, silicon could form the basis of an alternative biochemistry of life. Frances Arnold, a chemist at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena, along with postdoctoral assistant Jennifer Kan and graduate student Rusty Lewis are taking steps toward getting biology to eventually adopt silicon.

  • Leading engineers with the American National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and a member of the American National Academy of Inventors (NAI) provided hands-on robotics assembly and demonstrations to the student scholars, many of whom were witnessing this technology in person for the first time. One of the experts proving the demonstrations included Dr. Thomas Mensah, a fiber optics inventor and NAI fellow.

  • Nobel Laureate Andrew Schally and Jacqueline Quinn, environmental engineer at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, are among the seven inventors announced today as the 2016 inductees of the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame. The other inductees are William S. Dalton, D. Yogi Goswami, Alan George Marshall, Nicholas Muzyczka, and M.J. Soileau.

  • STC.UNM will host its thirteenth annual Innovation Awards Dinner on Wednesday, March 23, 2016, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the University of New Mexico to honor 63 faculty, staff and students who have received issued patents and trademarks and registered copyrights within the past year. Distinguished Professors Dr. Steven Brueck and Dr. Jeffrey Brinker who were recently elected as Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors, will also be honored.

  • Southern Research has developed 20 drugs to combat forms of cancer, ALS, Alzheimer’s, diabetes, kidney disease, Parkinson’s, and tuberculosis, including seven FDA-approved cancer drugs. “What we’re looking for is to prolong human life,” Art Tipton, Ph.D., Southern Research’s president and CEO since 2013.

  • Emmanuelle Charpentier from France and Jennifer A. Doudna from the USA are today being awarded the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for 2016 in the Paulskirche in Frankfurt. The two scientists are being honored for their pioneering work in the development of the programmable gene editing tool CRISPR-Cas9.

  • On April 21, Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, the Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Cancer Research and the Chair of Radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine, will be the keynote speaker at the Molecular Imaging of Cancer Metastasis Lecture.

  • As part of the Department of Computer Science’s Distinguished Lecture Series, the eminent computer scientist S.S. Iyengar will speak on “Network Security Analysis for Oblivious Routing Algorithms in Cloud Computing” at Illinois Institute of Technology.

  • In a record-breaking royalty monetization deal, the University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA) will receive more than half a billion dollars for a prostate cancer drug developed by researchers there, initially developed in the early 2000s under the leadership of UCLA chemist Michael Jung.

  • Inventor and Harvard professor David Edwards launches his digital scent project oNotes with the help of olfactory neurobiologist Richard L. Doty. David Edwards is a creator, scientist, and visionary whose work lies at the boundaries of artistic, design, and scientific practice. This event is to take place on April 27 at The Rubin Museum.

  • The American Chemical Society Division of Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) has selected a new class of PMSE Fellows for 2016. The following distinguished PMSE members have been chosen: Antonio Facchetti, Jung-Il Jin, Shiro Kobayashi, and Karen Winey.

  • Nader Engheta, the speaker of the ECE Distinguished Lecture Series: Optics at the Extreme, is the H. Nedwill Ramsey Professor at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, with affiliations in the Departments of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, Physics and Astronomy, and Bioengineering.

  • The UT Research Foundation (UTRF) recognized 28 University of Tennessee Health Science Center researchers for recent discoveries and commercialization successes at the 2016 Innovation Award Ceremony. Special recognition was given to Dr. Duane D. Miller, who holds more than 100 US patents, and was inducted into the National Academy of Inventors in 2015.

  • Top-Tier Biomedical Researchers like Stephen R. Quake, James A. Spudich, Pasko Rakic, and Rafi Ahmed will speak at the University of Pittsburgh Laureate Lecture Series. Stephen R. Quake, Lee Otterson Professor of Bioengineering and Applied Physics from Stanford University is expected to speak about Single Cell Genomics.

  • Dr. Vistasp M. Karbhari, President of the University of Texas at Arlington will be the keynote speaker at the Immigrant Journey Awards luncheon. As president, Dr. Karbhari is committed to advancing UT Arlington’s national and international profile while strengthening excellence in research and teaching and ensuring the success of the University’s more than 40,000 students in Texas and around the world.

  • Said M. Sebti, Ph.D., chair of the Drug Discovery Department and co-leader of the Chemical Biology and Molecular Medicine Program at Moffitt Cancer Center, has been awarded an Outstanding Investigator Award from the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

  • This talk on March 31, by Eric Fossum, will discuss the Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) concept. Dr. Eric Fossum is a Professor at the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth and Director of the School’s Ph.D. Innovation Program.

  • The University of Nebraska-Lincoln reached top membership within the National Academy of Inventors after being named a “sustaining member institution” by the academy. The NAI honored several UNL faculty, including Brian Larkins, James Linder, Prem Paul, Donald Weeks, John Woollam, and James Van Etten.

  • Rice bioengineer Rebecca Richards-Kortum has been appointed special adviser to the provost on health-related research and educational initiatives. Provost Marie Lynn Miranda announced the appointment Feb. 23.

  • The Dell Medical School announced earlier this month that UT engineering professor Nicholas Peppas has been selected to serve a courtesy appointment in the school’s Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care.

  • A Creativity Conversation with Emory University President James W. Wagner, led by Rosemary Magee, director of the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library, took place February 24. Emory’s Creativity Conversations series features a one-on-one discussion between an Emory scholar and a distinguished thinker and creator, giving the University community unique access to leaders in a wide range of fields.

  • Prof. Angela Belcher of MIT is making strides in creating batteries that are thin, flexible and shape-variable using genetically modified viruses. It is clear that we will need more efficient, inexpensive batteries if intermittent energy sources like wind and solar are to be used to maximum extent.

  • Professor John A. Rogers, Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, presents at the ChEMS Seminar: Materials and Assembly Approaches for Biodegradable Electronics.

  • President Roderick J. McDavis and Executive Vice President and Provost Pam Benoit from Ohio University host an event honoring 2015 Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering Gerardine Botte. The event takes place February 23 at 6:30 pm.

  • Elsa Garmire, the Sydney E. Junkins 1887 Professor of Engineering, retires this year after 21 years at Thayer School of Engineering. Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Engineers, and the National Academy of Inventors, she helped pioneer laser technology and is an expert in nonlinear optics.

  • Alan Willner, USC Viterbi professor in the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering and one of the world’s leading experts in optics and photonics, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering, one of the field’s highest honors.

  • Located in the Patrick T. Harker Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Laboratory, this state-of-the-art facility will enable researchers in academia, industry and government to create devices smaller than a human hair, supporting scientific advances in fields ranging from medical diagnostics to environmental sensing to solar energy harvesting. Keynote speaker Harold G. Craighead will be addressing the opening on March 8th.

  • The University of Nebraska-Lincoln reached top membership within the National Academy of Inventors after being named a “sustaining member institution” by the academy. The NAI honored several UNL faculty, including Brian Larkins, James Linder, Prem Paul, Donald Weeks, John Woollam, and James Van Etten.

  • Top scientist Prof. Krzysztof Matyjaszewski, University Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, will join the 3TU research programme for High Tech Materials (3TU.HTM) as a distinguished visiting professor.

  • Stuttering treatment pioneer Dr. Joseph S. Kalinowski of East Carolina University’s Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders is among 168 individuals to be named this year as fellows of the National Academy of Inventors.

  • University Distinguished Professor Bruce E. Dale, of the Michigan State University College of Engineering, will be inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering College of Fellows in 2016.

  • Illumina, Inc. today announced that Dr. Frances Arnold has joined the company’s Board of Directors. Dr. Arnold manages a research group at the California Institute of Technology and is the Director of the Donna and Benjamin M. Rosen Bioengineering Center.

  • PureTech Health plc, a cross-disciplinary healthcare company developing novel medicines to tackle fundamental healthcare needs in disruptive ways, today announced it has expanded its Scientific Advisory Board (“SAB”) and appointed new Senior Advisors to the company.

  • The National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation (NNPAF) will harness the genius of scientist, engineer and inventor Dr. Thomas Mensah, to launch STEM Reach 2020.

  • Distinguished Professor Chennupati Jagadish has been awarded Australia’s highest honour for his service to physics and engineering, leading a string of ANU academics recognised in the 2016 Australia Day Honours.

  • DAVIS–EicOsis LLC, a newly formed company that distinguished Professor Bruce Hammock of the University of California, Davis, founded to alleviate neuropathic and inflammatory pain, recently received a $4 million federal grant to advance his compound discovery through Phase 1 clinical trials.

  • Nicholas Peppas, professor in the McKetta Department of Chemical Engineering and director of the Institute of Biomaterials, Drug Delivery and Regenerative Medicine, has received a courtesy appointment in the Dell Medical School’s Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care.

  • University Distinguished Professor Bruce E. Dale, of the Michigan State University College of Engineering, will be inducted into the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) College of Fellows in 2016.

  • Kattesh Katti is the senior research scientist at the MU Research Reactor, and he’s working on shrinking prostate tumors using gold particles. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men (skin cancer being the most common).

  • The next big leap in computing could be just around the corner, thanks to a project being conducted by UT’s College of Engineering and the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute.

  • Even in a room filled with of some of the smarter people around, Barb Rohrer, Ph.D., stood out. The tall, lean researcher is a prolific inventor in the field of age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa, with more than 20 patents and three start-up companies to her credit.

  • Kattesh Katti, PhD, a professor at the University of Missouri (MU), has been named the 2016 Person of the Year in Science by Vijayavani, a daily newspaper in the Indian state of Karnataka.

  • The Engheta group is interested in the science and technology of fields and waves. Group members explore a variety of research scenarios in wave-matter interaction, in both the optical as well as microwave domains.

  • Four University of South Florida professors have been elected to the 2016 College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE): Cesario Borlongan and Shyam Mohapatra from the USF Morsani College of Medicine, USF Health; and Robert Frisina, Jr., and Sudeep Sarkar from the USF College of Engineering.

  • University of Cincinnati Professor Andrew J. Steckl was recently elected a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors Dec. 15.

  • In an unusual arrangement, Steve A. Kay, who since November has been the president of Scripps, is sharing Scripps’s leadership with Peter G. Schultz, a Scripps chemist who in September became the institute’s chief executive.

  • The Academy of Science St. Louis has honored MU Chancellor Hank Foley with the 2016 Science Leadership award. Since its inception, the Academy has promoted the recognition of the impressive scientists of St. Louis. He and his students have published over 120 scientific papers, and he has been named as inventor on 15 issued United States patents.

  • Abide Therapeutics congratulates the company’s co-founders and Scientific Advisory Board members Drs. Benjamin Cravatt and Dale Boger, and Board of Directors member Dr. Paul Schimmel, on their election to the National Academy of Inventors.

  • Santa J. Ono is in his fourth year as the president of the University of Cincinnati, which stands among the nation’s top 30 public research universities. Dr. Ono is a scientist, cellist, and former research fellow and faculty member of Harvard and Johns Hopkins.

  • Bruce Hammock is a distinguished professor of entomology in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. He is the founder and CEO of EicOsis.

  • The NAI named Professor and Sprint Eminent Scholar Chair Jianping “Jim” Zheng from Florida State University, a fellow, an honor that has only ever been bestowed on 581 other people worldwide.

  • U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory senior metallurgist Iver Anderson has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Establishment Labs announced today that M.I.T. Professor Dr. Robert Langer, winner of the prestigious Lemelson-M.I.T. Innovation Prize, will join its Scientific Advisory Board.

  • Leading computer scientist Venu Govindaraju has been named vice president for research and economic development at the University at Buffalo.

  • Dr. Laura E. Niklason, newly named as the Nicholas Greene Professor of Anesthesiology and Biomedical Engineering, is an internationally recognized researcher in cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  • An Ohio University professor has been selected as a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors for work on alternative energy sources and research and technology commercialization.

  • Andrew J. Steckl, University of Cincinnati College of Engineering and Applied Science Professor, has recently been named Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • Recently, Suzie Pun, a Robert F. Rushmer professor in the UW Bioengineering department, was recognized as a 2015 National Academy of Inventors (NAI) Fellow.

  • The National Newspaper Publishers Association Foundation (NNPAF) will harness the genius of scientist, engineer and inventor Dr. Thomas Mensah, to launch STEM Reach 2020.

  • In recognition of his numerous contributions to integrated optical devices and design, Richard M. Osgood, Eugene Higgins Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and professor emeritus of applied physics, has been named a 2015 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI).

  • UC Davis has a new “fellow” in the National Academy of Inventors: A. Hari Reddi, distinguished professor of orthopedics, a pioneer in the field of bone and cartilage regeneration and tissue engineering.

  • H. Vincent Poor, dean of Princeton University’s School of Engineering and Applied Science, has been named a 2015 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors in recognition of his fundamental contributions to wireless technology.

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